Written In Blood Volume 2

Author: Richard F. Selcer
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574413228
Size: 51.17 MB
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In 2010 Written in Blood Volume 1 told the stories of thirteen law officers who died in the line of duty between 1861 and 1909. Now Selcer and Foster are back with Volume 2 covering more line-of-duty deaths. This volume covers 1910 to 1928, as Fort Worth experiences a race riot, lynchings, bushwhacking, assassinations and martial law imposed by the U.S. Army.

Written In Blood Volume 2

Author: Richard F. Selcer
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574413228
Size: 57.66 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5869
Download
In 2010 Written in Blood Volume 1 told the stories of thirteen law officers who died in the line of duty between 1861 and 1909. Now Selcer and Foster are back with Volume 2 covering more line-of-duty deaths. This volume covers 1910 to 1928, as Fort Worth experiences a race riot, lynchings, bushwhacking, assassinations and martial law imposed by the U.S. Army.

Texas Lawmen 1900 1940

Author: Clifford R. Caldwell
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625840772
Size: 67.92 MB
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Lawlessness in Texas did not end with the close of the cowboy era. It just evolved, swapping horses and pistols for cars and semiautomatics. From Patrolman "Newt" Stewart, killed by a group of servicemen in February 1900, to Whitesboro chief of police William Thomas "Will" Miller, run down by a vehicle in the line of duty in 1940, Ron DeLord and Cliff Caldwell present a comprehensive chronicle of the brave--and some not so brave--peace officers who laid down their lives in the service of the State of Texas in the first half of the twentieth century.

Texas Lawmen 1835 1899

Author: Clifford R. Caldwell
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 161423633X
Size: 34.40 MB
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The tally of Texas lawmen killed during the state’s first sixty-five years of organized law enforcement is truly staggering. From Texas Rangers the likes of Silas Mercer Parker Jr., gunned down at Parker’s Fort in 1836, to Denton County sheriff ’s deputy Floyd Coberly, murdered by an inmate in 1897 after ten days on the job, this collection accounts for all of those unsung heroes. Not merely an attempt to retell a dozen popular peace officer legends, Texas Lawmen, 1835–1899 represents thousands of hours of research conducted over more than a decade. Ron DeLord and Cliff Caldwell have carefully assembled a unique and engaging chronicle of Texas history.

Hell S Half Acre

Author: Richard F. Selcer
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 0875655114
Size: 41.10 MB
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Texas is a place where legends are made, die, and are revived. Fort Worth, Texas, claims its own legend - Hell's Half Acre - a wild 'n' woolly accumulation of bordellos, cribs, dance houses, and gambling parlors. Tenderloin districts were a fact of life in every major town in the American West, but Hell's Half Acre - its myth and its reality - can be said to be a microcosm of them all. The most famous and infamous westerners visited the Acre: Timothy ("Longhair Jim") Courtright, Luke Short, Bat Masterson, Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, Sam Bass, Mary Porter, Etta Place, along with Butch Cassidy and his Wild Bunch, and many more. For civic leaders and reformers, the Acre presented a dilemma - the very establishments they sought to close down or regulate were major contributors to the local economy. Controversial in its heyday and receiving new attention by such movies as Lonesome Dove, Hell's Half Acre remains the subject of debate among historians and researchers today. Richard Selcer successfully separates fact from fiction, myth from reality, in this vibrant study of the men and women of Cowtown's notorious Acre.

Fort Worth Characters

Author: Richard F. Selcer
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574412744
Size: 42.33 MB
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Fort Worth history is far more than the handful of familiar names that every true-blue Fort Worther hears growing up: leaders such as Amon Carter, B. B. Paddock, J. Frank Norris, and William McDonald. Their names are indexed in the history books for ready reference. But the drama that is Fort Worth history contains other, less famous characters who played important roles, like Judge James Swayne, Madam Mary Porter, and Marshal Sam Farmer: well known enough in their day but since forgotten. Others, like Al Hayne, lived their lives in the shadows until one, spectacular moment of heroism. Then there are the lawmen, Jim Courtright, Jeff Daggett, and Thomas Finch. They wore badges, but did not always represent the best of law and order. These seven plus five others are gathered together between the covers of this book. Each has a story that deserves to be told. If they did not all make history, they certainly lived in historic times. The jury is still out on whether they shaped their times or merely reflected those times. Either way, their stories add new perspectives to the familiar Fort Worth story, revealing how the law worked in the old days and what life was like for persons of color and for women living in a man's world. As the old TV show used to say, “There are a million stories in the 'Naked City.'” There may not be quite as many stories in Cowtown, but there are plenty waiting to be told—enough for future volumes of Fort Worth Characters. But this is a good starting point.

Poetry And The Police

Author: Robert Darnton
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674059271
Size: 56.59 MB
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Darnton has ably mined the available evidence surrounding the 1749 investigation and string of arrests for sedition known as the "Affair of the Fourteen" and produced a remarkable analysis of a subversive Parisian public discourse that openly attacked the king, his mistress, new taxes, and an unpopular peace treaty. Darnton lucidly reconstructs a world where information traveled through poems and songs set to familiar melodies; he reminds us that our world of instant communication, tweets, and 24-hour news cycles is not as distinctive as we may believe. With rich end matter that includes the lyrics of poems and songs as well as a link to a superb recording of some of the songs by cabaret artist Helene Delavault, this interdisciplinary piece is highly recommended for serious students across the humanities as well as readers with an interest in 18th-century French culture and politics.