Women Without Class

Author: Julie Bettie
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520280016
Size: 41.60 MB
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In this examination of white and Mexican-American girls coming of age in California''s Central Valley-now with a new introduction-Julie Bettie turns class theory on its head, offering new tools for understanding the ways in which identity is constructed in relationship to race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Documenting the categories of subculture and style that high school students use to understand their differences, Bettie depicts the complex identity performances of contemporary girls. The title, Women Without Class, refers at once to young working-class women who have little cultural c.

Women Without Class

Author: Julie Bettie
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520929314
Size: 55.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this examination of white and Mexican-American girls coming of age in California's Central Valley, Julie Bettie turns class theory on its head and offers new tools for understanding the ways in which class identity is constructed and, at times, fails to be constructed in relationship to color, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Documenting the categories of subculture and style that high school students use to explain class and racial/ethnic differences among themselves, Bettie depicts the complex identity performances of contemporary girls. The title, Women Without Class, refers at once to young working-class women who have little cultural capital to enable class mobility, to the fact that class analysis and social theory has remained insufficiently transformed by feminist and ethnic studies, and to the fact that some feminist analysis has itself been complicit in the failure to theorize women as class subjects. Bettie's research and analysis make a case for analytical and political attention to class, but not at the expense of attention to other axes of identity and social formations.

Women Without Class

Author: Julie Bettie
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520235427
Size: 77.95 MB
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"Pathbreaking and original. Bettie's comparative analysis of race, class, and gender performance is unparalleled in current scholarship."--Angela Valenzuela, author of Subtractive Schooling: U.S.-Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring "What a wonderful book! It deserves to be placed next to Paul Willis' Learning to Labour--or in front of it. Bettie seamlessly weaves bold theoretical arguments together with a nuanced portrayal of senior high school girls, Anglo and Mexican, working-class and middle-class--or in their words, the preps, hicks, smokers/rockers/trash and the Mexican preps, cholas/cholos, hard-cores, and las chicas. Her book is equally a challenge to feminists who can see only gender, and theorists of class and race who cannot see gender at all. It is one of the finest empirical and conceptual discussions of how gender, race, and class intersect. It is also a page-turner, lucidly and often movingly written."--Elizabeth Long, author of From Sociology to Cultural Studies: New Perspectives "Julie Bettie has written an extraordinary book. Engagingly written, empathetic, and filled with insight, Women Without Class makes a clear and convincing case that essentialized concepts of race and gender are not only inaccurate, but even worse, part of the ideological structure that renders class invisible. Bettie's book sets a new standard of excellence for studies of schooling and social identities."--George Lipsitz, author of American Studies in a Moment of Danger "In this fresh and realistic book, Julie Bettie tells us uncomfortable, but important truths about the lives of young women in an American high school. Within the kaleidoscope of gender and ethnic identities are injuries, exclusions, and the powerful (though often hidden) effects of class. This is a book to be read by everyone who wants to understand contemporary youth."--R.W. Connell, author of Gender and Power: Society, the Person, and Sexual Politics "Women Without Class is an important contribution to scholarship on young women and the intersections of race and class with gender. The book is fantastically rich in observation and analysis. The author resists with vigor a victimology perspective, but at the same time shows how the marginalization of class from contemporary work in the field results in a failure to understand how assumptions about post-feminism, female success, and social mobility produce new and virulent exclusions."--Angela McRobbie, Professor of Communications at Goldsmiths College London and author of Feminism and Youth Culture "Bettie is doing something no one has done before: she explores the many ways that BOTH Mexican American and White adolescent girls interpret and enact racially gendered class identities. This book is essential reading for any serious scholar of gender, class, and race-ethnicity."--Denise Segura, Professor of Sociology, University of California-Santa Barbara "Rather than following traditional and stereotypical notions common in mainstream U.S. sociology and criminology, which portray youth as delinquent and criminals, Bettie gives the reader the vivid representations of a group of working-class youth who are searching for 'creative responses to the injuries of inequality.'"--Esther Madriz, author of Nothing Bad Happens to Good Girls: Fear of Crime in Women's Lives

Invisible Families

Author: Mignon Moore
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520950151
Size: 21.11 MB
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Mignon R. Moore brings to light the family life of a group that has been largely invisible—gay women of color—in a book that challenges long-standing ideas about racial identity, family formation, and motherhood. Drawing from interviews and surveys of one hundred black gay women in New York City, Invisible Families explores the ways that race and class have influenced how these women understand their sexual orientation, find partners, and form families. In particular, the study looks at the ways in which the past experiences of women who came of age in the 1960s and 1970s shape their thinking, and have structured their lives in communities that are not always accepting of their openly gay status. Overturning generalizations about lesbian families derived largely from research focused on white, middle-class feminists, Invisible Families reveals experiences within black American and Caribbean communities as it asks how people with multiple stigmatized identities imagine and construct an individual and collective sense of self.

Digesting Race Class And Gender

Author: I. Ken
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230115381
Size: 56.67 MB
Format: PDF
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How are the ways that race organizes our lives related to the ways gender and class organize our lives? How might these organizing mechanisms conflict or work together? In Digesting Race, Class, and Gender, Ivy Ken likens race, class, and gender to foods - foods that are produced in fields, mixed together in bowls, and digested in our social and institutional bodies. In the field, one food may contaminate another through cross-pollination. In the mixing bowl, each food s original molecular structure changes in the presence of others. And within a meal, the presence of one food may impede or facilitate the digestion of another. At each of these sites, the "foods" of race, class, and gender are involved in dynamic relationships with each other that have implications for the shape - or the taste - of our social order.

The Classless Society

Author: Paul W. Kingston
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804738064
Size: 54.39 MB
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This book directly challenges a long-standing intellectual tradition of class analysis. Insisting on a realist conception of class, Kingston argues that presumed classes do not significantly share distinct, life-defining experiences.

Shades Of White

Author: Pamela Perry
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822383659
Size: 32.16 MB
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What does it mean to be young, American, and white at the dawn of the twenty-first century? By exploring this question and revealing the everyday social processes by which high schoolers define white identities, Pamela Perry offers much-needed insights into the social construction of race and whiteness among youth. Through ethnographic research and in-depth interviews of students in two demographically distinct U.S. high schools—one suburban and predominantly white; the other urban, multiracial, and minority white—Perry shares students’ candor about race and self-identification. By examining the meanings students attached (or didn’t attach) to their social lives and everyday cultural practices, including their taste in music and clothes, she shows that the ways white students defined white identity were not only markedly different between the two schools but were considerably diverse and ambiguous within them as well. Challenging reductionist notions of whiteness and white racism, this study suggests how we might go “beyond whiteness” to new directions in antiracist activism and school reform. Shades of White is emblematic of an emerging second wave of whiteness studies that focuses on the racial identity of whites. It will appeal to scholars and students of anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies, as well as to those involved with high school education and antiracist activities.

Unequal Childhoods

Author: Annette Lareau
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520271424
Size: 46.21 MB
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This book is a powerful portrayal of class inequalities in the United States. It contains insightful analysis of the processes through which inequality is reproduced, and it frankly engages with methodological and analytic dilemmas usually glossed over in academic texts.

Uncivil Youth

Author: Soo Ah Kwon
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822354233
Size: 23.25 MB
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Soo Ah Kwon explores youth of color activism, focusing on the political conditions that enable—and limit—youth of color from achieving meaningful change given the entrenchment of nonprofits within the logic of the neoliberal state.

Knowing What We Know

Author: Gail Garfield
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813536606
Size: 15.48 MB
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Annotation. Bringing together life-history interviews with nine women, this study urges a departure from established approaches that position women as victims of exclusively male violence. Instead, the author explores what happens when women's ability to make decisions and act upon those choices comes into conflict with cultural and social constraints.