White Like Me

Author: Tim Wise
Publisher: Soft Skull Press
ISBN: 1593764707
Size: 66.43 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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With a new preface and updated chapters, White Like Me is one-part memoir, one-part polemical essay collection. It is a personal examination of the way in which racial privilege shapes the daily lives of white Americans in every realm: employment, education, housing, criminal justice, and elsewhere. Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise demonstrates the ways in which racism not only burdens people of color, but also benefits, in relative terms, those who are “white like him.” He discusses how racial privilege can harm whites in the long run and make progressive social change less likely. He explores the ways in which whites can challenge their unjust privileges, and explains in clear and convincing language why it is in the best interest of whites themselves to do so. Using anecdotes instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a narrative that is at once readable and yet scholarly, analytical and yet accessible.

White Like Me

Author: Tim Wise
Publisher: Soft Skull Press
ISBN: 1593764251
Size: 52.78 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2891
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With a new preface and updated chapters, White Like Me is one-part memoir, one-part polemical essay collection. It is a personal examination of the way in which racial privilege shapes the daily lives of white Americans in every realm: employment, education, housing, criminal justice, and elsewhere. Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise demonstrates the ways in which racism not only burdens people of color, but also benefits, in relative terms, those who are “white like him.” He discusses how racial privilege can harm whites in the long run and make progressive social change less likely. He explores the ways in which whites can challenge their unjust privileges, and explains in clear and convincing language why it is in the best interest of whites themselves to do so. Using anecdotes instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a narrative that is at once readable and yet scholarly, analytical and yet accessible.

White Like Me

Author: Tim Wise
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1458780910
Size: 14.87 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Flipping John Howard Griffin's classic Black Like Me, and extending Noel Ignatiev's How The Irish Became White into the present-day, Wise explores the meanings and consequences of whiteness, and discusses the ways in which racial privilege can harm not just people of color, but also whites. Using stories instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a narrative that is at once readable and yet scholarly; analytical and yet accessible.

Black Like Kyra White Like Me

Author: Judith Vigna
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1497683416
Size: 14.90 MB
Format: PDF
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Kyra is Christy’s best friend from the youth center. Matt and Julie are Christy’s best friends on her block. When Kyra’s African-American family moves into Christy’s white neighborhood, Christy learns a hard lesson about prejudice.

Black Like Me

Author: John Howard Griffin
Publisher: Wings Press
ISBN: 1609401085
Size: 66.85 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This American classic has been corrected from the original manuscripts and indexed, featuring historic photographs and an extensive biographical afterword.

White Like Her

Author: Gail Lukasik
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 151072415X
Size: 63.52 MB
Format: PDF
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White Like Her: My Family’s Story of Race and Racial Passing is the story of Gail Lukasik’s mother’s “passing,” Gail’s struggle with the shame of her mother’s choice, and her subsequent journey of self-discovery and redemption. In the historical context of the Jim Crow South, Gail explores her mother’s decision to pass, how she hid her secret even from her own husband, and the price she paid for choosing whiteness. Haunted by her mother’s fear and shame, Gail embarks on a quest to uncover her mother’s racial lineage, tracing her family back to eighteenth-century colonial Louisiana. In coming to terms with her decision to publicly out her mother, Gail changed how she looks at race and heritage. With a foreword written by Kenyatta Berry, host of PBS's Genealogy Roadshow, this unique and fascinating story of coming to terms with oneself breaks down barriers.

Dear White America

Author: Tim Wise
Publisher: City Lights Books
ISBN: 0872865851
Size: 27.61 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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White Americans have long been comfortable in the assumption that they are the cultural norm. Now that notion is being challenged, as white people wrestle with what it means to be part of a fast-changing, truly multicultural nation. Facing chronic economic insecurity, a popular culture that reflects the nation's diverse cultural reality, a future in which they will no longer constitute the majority of the population, and with a black president in the White House, whites are growing anxious. This anxiety has helped to create the Tea Party movement, with its call to "take our country back." By means of a racialized nostalgia for a mythological past, the Right is enlisting fearful whites into its campaign for reactionary social and economic policies. In urgent response, Tim Wise has penned his most pointed and provocative work to date. Employing the form of direct personal address, he points a finger at whites' race-based self-delusion, explaining how such an agenda will only do harm to the nation's people, including most whites. In no uncertain terms, he argues that the hope for survival of American democracy lies in the embrace of our multicultural past, present and future. "Sparing neither family nor self…he considers how the deck has always been stacked in his and other white people's favor…His candor is invigorating."—Publishers Weekly "One of the most brilliant, articulate and courageous critics of white privilege in the nation."—Michael Eric Dyson "Tim Wise has written another blockbuster! His new book, Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, is a cogent analysis of the problems of race and inequality as well as a plea for those who harbor views about race and racism to modify and indeed eliminate them. While the book's title addresses white people, this is really a book for anyone who is concerned about eliminating the issue of racial disparity in our society. This is must read and a good read."—Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., the Jesse Climenko Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the Executive Director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice. He is the author of a number of books, including The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Race, Class and Crime in America "Tim Wise is an American hero in the truest sense of the term—he tells the truth, no matter how inconvenient that truth might be. Dear White America is a desperately needed response to the insidious mythology that pretends whites are oppressed and people of color unduly privileged. In the process, it exposes how new forms of racism have been deliberately embedded into our supposedly 'color blind' culture. Read this book—but rest assured, it's not for the faint of heart."—David Sirota, syndicated columnist, radio host, author of Back to Our Future: How the 1980s Explain the World We Live In Now "The foremost white analyst of racism in America never fails to provide fresh takes as he punctures myths and defenses."—World Wide Work Tim Wise is one of the most prominent antiracist essayists, educators, and activists in the United States. He is regularly interviewed by A-list media, including CNN, C-SPAN, The Tavis Smiley Show, The Tom Joyner Morning Show, Michael Eric Dyson's radio program, and many more. His most recent books include Colorblind and Between Barack and a Hard Place.

Black And White Like You And Me

Author: Thomas Daniels
Publisher: Tomjo Media
ISBN: 9781946653000
Size: 31.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Even in 1960s Detroit, race isn't everything. Tom Daniels and "Cookie" Marsh will be the first to tell you that race isn't everything. But it did shape the way they experienced the world growing up in Detroit in the 1950s and 60s. Tom "Cookie" Marsh grew up in a black neighborhood on Detroit's west side. Tom Daniels grew up in a mixed, working-class neighborhood on Detroit's east side. Both men grew up in strict households where they "always got what we needed, and sometimes what we wanted" and both saw their city, their country, and their world transform around them through the Civil Rights movement, riots, and the Viet Nam War. But sometimes parallel lines intersect. As each man tells his story, it is apparent that race isn't just "black and white" but it is part of what makes their friendship extraordinary. Their experiences will show you that race made for huge differences in their experiences, while, in spite of race, there are also touching similarities that made it possible for two men, in their older years, to overcome decades of racial turbulence of their upbringing to become lifelong friends. Follow Tom and Cookie. Hear about their lives, their upbringing, their successes and regrets growing up in black and white Detroit - and how when it boils down to it, the things that are truly important are actually black and white, like you and me.

White Metropolis

Author: Michael Phillips
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292774249
Size: 49.97 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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From the nineteenth century until today, the power brokers of Dallas have always portrayed their city as a progressive, pro-business, racially harmonious community that has avoided the racial, ethnic, and class strife that roiled other Southern cities. But does this image of Dallas match the historical reality? In this book, Michael Phillips delves deeply into Dallas's racial and religious past and uncovers a complicated history of resistance, collaboration, and assimilation between the city's African American, Mexican American, and Jewish communities and its white power elite. Exploring more than 150 years of Dallas history, Phillips reveals how white business leaders created both a white racial identity and a Southwestern regional identity that excluded African Americans from power and required Mexican Americans and Jews to adopt Anglo-Saxon norms to achieve what limited positions of power they held. He also demonstrates how the concept of whiteness kept these groups from allying with each other, and with working- and middle-class whites, to build a greater power base and end elite control of the city. Comparing the Dallas racial experience with that of Houston and Atlanta, Phillips identifies how Dallas fits into regional patterns of race relations and illuminates the unique forces that have kept its racial history hidden until the publication of this book.

White Lies Matter

Author: Tim Wise
Publisher: City Lights Open Media
ISBN: 9780872867406
Size: 35.70 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In an era of escalating racial tension, Tim Wise provides a much-needed critique of the manipulation of fear that breeds violence and injustice.