What Your Doctor Really Thinks

Author: Ian Blumer, M.D.
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 145972612X
Size: 28.61 MB
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Q. You’ve been sent for a stress test. Does this mean your doctor thinks there’s something wrong with your heart? A. Not necessarily. Doctors often schedule stress tests when they are certain a patient’s heart is healthy. So why the test? In What Your Doctor Really Thinks, Ian Blumer looks at the doctor-patient relationship, and explains what your doctor will and won’t tell you in the examining room. Blumer lets you know what is going on in your physician’s head, and suggests what should be going on in your head, when you present him or her with symptoms. Fatigue, chest pain, headaches, abdominal pain, dizziness, shortness of breath ... Blumer covers a variety of symptoms and discusses what direction the examination may take. This book is a look into the psyche of the doctor and the patient during their meetings. It is a discussion of what both parties might be thinking, but not saying, and it reveals the so-called "mind games" that often take place. It tells people why, without their having even realized it, they have just left a doctor’s office not knowing if the "growth" they have is worrisome or harmless, if they have a dim future or a good one. It tells people why doctors are often evasive, or, at times, downright rude. What Your Doctor Really Thinks is not an aid to self-diagnosis. It is not a compilation of medical anecdotes glorifying the practice of medicine. And it is not a self-help guide to teach you about the disease that afflicts you. It is, rather, an aid to understanding your doctor, and to understanding yourself. Everyone from the health-conscious to the hypochondriac will find familiar symptoms in Blumer’s book. You may find comfort in knowing that your symptoms are nothing to worry about; or you may find reason to see your doctor about something that may be more serious than you had thought. Regardless, you will learn not just what a doctor’s diagnosis might be; you will also learn why they have made that diagnosis, and what the diagnosis means.

What Your Doctor Really Thinks

Author: Ian Blumer
Publisher: Editorial Edinumen
ISBN: 9780888822154
Size: 26.67 MB
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Ian Blumer looks at the doctor-patient relationship what your doctor will and wont tell you in the examining room.

How Doctors Think

Author: Jerome Groopman
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780547348636
Size: 12.62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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On average, a physician will interrupt a patient describing her symptoms within eighteen seconds. In that short time, many doctors decide on the likely diagnosis and best treatment. Often, decisions made this way are correct, but at crucial moments they can also be wrong -- with catastrophic consequences. In this myth-shattering book, Jerome Groopman pinpoints the forces and thought processes behind the decisions doctors make. Groopman explores why doctors err and shows when and how they can -- with our help -- avoid snap judgments, embrace uncertainty, communicate effectively, and deploy other skills that can profoundly impact our health. This book is the first to describe in detail the warning signs of erroneous medical thinking and reveal how new technologies may actually hinder accurate diagnoses. How Doctors Think offers direct, intelligent questions patients can ask their doctors to help them get back on track. Groopman draws on a wealth of research, extensive interviews with some of the country’s best doctors, and his own experiences as a doctor and as a patient. He has learned many of the lessons in this book the hard way, from his own mistakes and from errors his doctors made in treating his own debilitating medical problems. How Doctors Think reveals a profound new view of twenty-first-century medical practice, giving doctors and patients the vital information they need to make better judgments together.

When Doctors Don T Listen

Author: Dr. Benjamin Carter Hett
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250013577
Size: 78.28 MB
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In this examination of the doctor-patient relationship, Drs. Wen and Kosowsky argue that diagnosis, once the cornerstone of medicine, is fast becoming a lost art, with grave consequences. Using real-life stories of cookbook-diagnoses-gone-bad, the doctors illustrate how active patient participation can prevent these mistakes. Wen and Kosowsky offer tangible follow-up questions patients can easily incorporate into every doctor's visit to avoid counterproductive and even potentially harmful tests. In the pursuit for the best medical care available, readers can't afford to miss out on these inside-tips and more: - How to deal with a doctor who seems too busy to listen to you - 8-Pillars to a Better Diagnosis - How to tell the whole story of your illness - Learning test risks and evaluating whether they're worth it - How to get a working diagnosis at the end of every doctor's visit By empowering patients to engage with their doctors as partners in their diagnosis, When Doctors Don't Listen is an essential guide that enables patients to speak up and take back control of their health care.

What Patients Say What Doctors Hear

Author: Danielle Ofri
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807062634
Size: 25.67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Patients, anxious to convey their symptoms, feel an urgency to "make their case" to their doctors. Doctors, under pressure to be efficient, multitask while patients speak and often miss the key elements. Add in stereotypes, unconscious bias, conflicting agendas, and fear of lawsuits and the risk of misdiagnosis and medical errors multiplies dangerously. ... Reporting on the latest research studies and interviewing scholars, doctors, and patients, Dr. Ofri reveals how better communication can lead to better health for all of us."--Jacket.

What Doctors Feel

Author: Danielle Ofri
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807073334
Size: 17.78 MB
Format: PDF
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A look at the emotional side of medicine—the shame, fear, anger, anxiety, empathy, and even love that affect patient care Physicians are assumed to be objective, rational beings, easily able to detach as they guide patients and families through some of life’s most challenging moments. But doctors’ emotional responses to the life-and-death dramas of everyday practice have a profound impact on medical care. And while much has been written about the minds and methods of the medical professionals who save our lives, precious little has been said about their emotions. In What Doctors Feel, Dr. Danielle Ofri has taken on the task of dissecting the hidden emotional responses of doctors, and how these directly influence patients. How do the stresses of medical life—from paperwork to grueling hours to lawsuits to facing death—affect the medical care that doctors can offer their patients? Digging deep into the lives of doctors, Ofri examines the daunting range of emotions—shame, anger, empathy, frustration, hope, pride, occasionally despair, and sometimes even love—that permeate the contemporary doctor-patient connection. Drawing on scientific studies, including some surprising research, Dr. Danielle Ofri offers up an unflinching look at the impact of emotions on health care. With her renowned eye for dramatic detail, Dr. Ofri takes us into the swirling heart of patient care, telling stories of caregivers caught up and occasionally torn down by the whirlwind life of doctoring. She admits to the humiliation of an error that nearly killed one of her patients and her forever fear of making another. She mourns when a beloved patient is denied a heart transplant. She tells the riveting stories of an intern traumatized when she is forced to let a newborn die in her arms, and of a doctor whose daily glass of wine to handle the frustrations of the ER escalates into a destructive addiction. But doctors don’t only feel fear, grief, and frustration. Ofri also reveals that doctors tell bad jokes about “toxic sock syndrome,” cope through gallows humor, find hope in impossible situations, and surrender to ecstatic happiness when they triumph over illness. The stories here reveal the undeniable truth that emotions have a distinct effect on how doctors care for their patients. For both clinicians and patients, understanding what doctors feel can make all the difference in giving and getting the best medical care.

Every Patient Tells A Story

Author: Lisa Sanders
Publisher: Harmony Books
ISBN: 0767922476
Size: 55.16 MB
Format: PDF
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A Yale School of Medicine physician, columnist for "Diagnosis," and technical advisor for the television show House shares the experiences of doctors facing complex medical mysteries in order to illustrate the art and science of diagnosis. Reprint. A New York Times extended-list bestseller.

Bounding Biomedicine

Author: Colleen Derkatch
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022634598X
Size: 20.84 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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During the 1990s, an unprecedented number of Americans turned to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), an umbrella term encompassing chiropractic, energy healing, herbal medicine, homeopathy, meditation, naturopathy, and traditional Chinese medicine. By 1997, nearly half the US population was seeking CAM, spending at least $27 billion out of pocket. Bounding Biomedicine centers on this boundary-changing era, looking at how consumer demand shook the health care hierarchy. Drawing on scholarship in rhetoric and science and technology studies, the book examines how the medical profession scrambled to maintain its position of privilege and prestige, even as its foothold appeared to be crumbling. Colleen Derkatch analyzes CAM-themed medical journals and related discourse to illustrate how members of the medical establishment applied Western standards of evaluation and peer review to test health practices that did not fit easily (or at all) within standard frameworks of medical research. And she shows that, despite many practitioners’ efforts to eliminate the boundaries between “regular” and “alternative,” this research on CAM and the forms of communication that surrounded it ultimately ended up creating an even greater division between what counts as safe, effective health care and what does not. At a time when debates over treatment choices have flared up again, Bounding Biomedicine gives us a possible blueprint for understanding how the medical establishment will react to this new era of therapeutic change.

The Dundurn Group

Author: The Dundurn Group
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 9781550026603
Size: 63.18 MB
Format: PDF
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What Doctors Cannot Tell You

Author: Kevin B. Jones, M. D.
Publisher: Tallow Book Llc
ISBN: 9780985245474
Size: 25.84 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Almost 20 billion times each year, a person walks into a doctor's office. The person becomes a patient. Everyone becomes this patient at some point. How will you talk to your physicians? What will you tell them? What will they tell you in return? They can't tell you what they don't know. They can tell you when they don't know. Will they? What Doctors Cannot Tell You explores the uncertainty that pervades medicine. It breaks the code of silence within which too many physician-patient conversations take place. The patients' stories in its pages will empower you to ask questions of your physicians, with a firm belief that healing and hope begin from honesty in those critical conversations. This book marries surgically precise medical narrative to thinking and perspective that will throw the curtains wide on what medicine knows, what it doesn't know, and how it tries to tell the difference between the two. This book is Outliers meets Patch Adams, only with an added how-to twist beyond the instructive and powerfully human narratives. At every chapter's end, the reader will find a list of principles, one for each vignette, and questions to ask his or her physician. A few books in the last decade have focused on human errors and complications in medicine. Each has suggested ways to improve medicine by the application of checklists and protocols. This book adds a unique and important angle to these considerations: How firmly do we know what should go on the checklist or protocol in the first place? How clear has medicine been with its patients about what it cannot know or does not yet know?