We As Freemen

Author: Medley, Keith Medley
Publisher: Pelican Publishing
ISBN: 1455613932
Size: 12.67 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Plessy V Ferguson

Author: Tim McNeese
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1438103409
Size: 48.73 MB
Format: PDF
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On a muggy summer day in 1892, an unassuming, well-dressed shoemaker from New Orleans named Homer Plessy bought a first-class ticket from the East Louisiana Railroad and boarded a passenger car designated whites only. But Plessy's journey was soon derailed. By day's end, he'd been arrested and convicted. His crime? Being black and boarding the wrong railroad car. Plessy's act of defiance constituted a violation of the state's separate-car law, a statute designed to keep the races separated on Louisiana's public transportation systems. Over the next four years, his case would work its way through the legal system until it landed on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court. To Plessy supporters, the case served as a signpost for America's future. Would Jim Crow statutes continue to define black and white relations in the approaching 20th century? Or would blacks be able to taste new freedom? Plessy v. Ferguson sets the scene for this benchmark case with solid background information and lively biographies of those involved. Full-color photographs, detailed footnotes, and a chronology and timeline help put the proceedings in context.

Plessy V Ferguson

Author: Thomas J. Davis Ph.D.
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313391882
Size: 38.72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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More than the story of one man's case, this book tells the story of entire generations of people marked as "mixed race" in America amid slavery and its aftermath, and being officially denied their multicultural identity and personal rights as a result.

The Human Tradition In The Civil Rights Movement

Author: Susan M. Glisson
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742544093
Size: 31.14 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This engaging collection of biographies explores the greater civil rights movement in America from Reconstruction to the 1970s while emphasizing the importance of grassroots actions and individual agency in the effort to bring about national civil renewal. While focusing on the importance of individuals on the local level working towards civil rights they also explore the influence that this primarily African-American movement had on others including La Raza, the Native American Movement, feminism, and gay rights. By widening the time frame studied, these essays underscore the difficult, often unrewarded and generational nature of social change.

The United States Of The United Races

Author: Greg Carter
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081477251X
Size: 74.79 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Barack Obama’s historic presidency has re-inserted mixed race into the national conversation. While the troubled and pejorative history of racial amalgamation throughout U.S. history is a familiar story, The United States of the United Races reconsiders an understudied optimist tradition, one which has praised mixture as a means to create a new people, bring equality to all, and fulfill an American destiny. In this genealogy, Greg Carter re-envisions racial mixture as a vehicle for pride and a way for citizens to examine mixed America as a better America. Tracing the centuries-long conversation that began with Hector St. John de Crevecoeur’s Letters of an American Farmer in the 1780s through to the Mulitracial Movement of the 1990s and the debates surrounding racial categories on the U.S. Census in the twenty-first century, Greg Carter explores a broad range of documents and moments, unearthing a new narrative that locates hope in racial mixture. Carter traces the reception of the concept as it has evolved over the years, from and decade to decade and century to century, wherein even minor changes in individual attitudes have paved the way for major changes in public response. The United States of the United Races sweeps away an ugly element of U.S. history, replacing it with a new understanding of race in America.

Plessy V Ferguson

Author: Joan Axelrod-Contrada
Publisher: Benchmark Books
ISBN: 9780761429517
Size: 38.41 MB
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Looks at the 1896 Supreme Court case that tested the constitutionality of laws in the South that enforced racial segregation in train travel, and discusses the impact of the verdict which provided a legal cover for racial discrimination throughout the United States.

How Race Is Made

Author: Mark M. Smith
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807877272
Size: 58.49 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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For at least two centuries, argues Mark Smith, white southerners used all of their senses--not just their eyes--to construct racial difference and define race. His provocative analysis, extending from the colonial period to the mid-twentieth century, shows how whites of all classes used the artificial binary of "black" and "white" to justify slavery and erect the political, legal, and social structure of segregation. Based on painstaking research, How Race Is Made is a highly original, always frank, and often disturbing book. After enslaved Africans were initially brought to America, the offspring of black and white sexual relationships (consensual and forced) complicated the purely visual sense of racial typing. As mixed-race people became more and more common and as antebellum race-based slavery and then postbellum racial segregation became central to southern society, white southerners asserted that they could rely on their other senses--touch, smell, sound, and taste--to identify who was "white" and who was not. Sensory racial stereotypes were invented and irrational, but at every turn, Smith shows, these constructions of race, immune to logic, signified difference and perpetuated inequality. Smith argues that the history of southern race relations and the construction of racial difference on which that history is built cannot be understood fully on the basis of sight alone. In order to come to terms with the South's past and present, Smith says, we must explore the sensory dynamics underpinning the deeply emotional construction of race. How Race Is Made takes a bold step toward that understanding.

Southern Queen

Author: Thomas Ruys Smith
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1441158227
Size: 42.36 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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New Orleans occupies a singular position within American life. Drawing deeply from Old World traditions and New World possibilities, the port city of the Mississippi has proved a lure to an extraordinary variety of travellers from its very earliest days. New Orleans has always been a world city like no other: it combines the magnolia and moonlight appeal of Southern romanticism, a popular sense of exoticism and decadence, the hint of illicit sex, and a cultural history without compare. However, alongside the glamour there runs another story - of tension, conflict, hardship and destruction. It was in the nineteenth century that the city's most distinctive characteristics were forged, and chapters will be based around signal moments that reveal the city's essential qualities: the Battle of New Orleans in 1815; the World's Fair in 1884; the establishment of Storyville in 1897. Whilst painting a portrait of the public face of New Orleans, the book will look behind the carnival mask to explore aspects of the city's history which have so often been kept hidden from view.

Empire Of Sin

Author: Gary Krist
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445644606
Size: 42.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Empire of Sin is a vibrant account of New Orleans in the early 1920s, a time when commercialised vice, jazz culture and endemic crime form the background for a civil war that lasts for thirty years. At its centre the city's vice lord fights desperately to keep his empire intact. Populated by flamboyant prostitutes, crusading moral reformers, dissolute jazzmen, ruthless Mafiosi, corrupt politicians and a violent serial killer, the heady and dangerous underworld of the Jazz Age is bought vividly to life in Empire of Sin. This gripping account intertwines personal stories with the wider history of New Orleans and plunges the reader into the heart of a city at war with itself.

African Americans Of New Orleans

Author: Turry Flucker
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439622418
Size: 71.93 MB
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Enslaved Africans and free people of color of Louisiana deserve the title of "Founding Fathers" just as much as the French, the Spanish, and the Americans. In spite of their subjugated role as slaves, African Americans of Louisiana, and subsequently New Orleans, were contributors to the success of the state and the city far beyond their role within the labor force. Imported into the Louisiana Territory by John Law's Company of the Indies, enslaved Africans, fed on a pound of corn a day, gave birth to American figures of the 19th and 20th centuries. Mahalia Jackson, Louis Armstrong, Homer Plessy, Marie Laveau, Buddy Bolden, Julies Lion, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, the fighting men of the Louisiana Native Guard, Ernest "Dutch" Morial, and many other African Americans contributed to the growth and development of New Orleans. Every African American citizen of New Orleans is intrinsically connected to the city's cultural and political landscape.