Thoreau And The Language Of Trees

Author: Richard Higgins
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520294041
Size: 68.30 MB
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Trees were central to Henry David Thoreau’s creativity as a writer, his work as a naturalist, his thought, and his inner life. His portraits of them were so perfect, it was as if he could see the sap flowing beneath their bark. When Thoreau wrote that the poet loves the pine tree as his own shadow in the air, he was speaking about himself. In short, he spoke their language. In this original book, Richard Higgins explores Thoreau’s deep connections to trees: his keen perception of them, the joy they gave him, the poetry he saw in them, his philosophical view of them, and how they fed his soul. His lively essays show that trees were a thread connecting all parts of Thoreau’s being—heart, mind, and spirit. Included are one hundred excerpts from Thoreau’s writings about trees, paired with over sixty of the author’s photographs. Thoreau’s words are as vivid now as they were in 1890, when an English naturalist wrote that he was unusually able to “to preserve the flashing forest colors in unfading light.” Thoreau and the Language of Trees shows that Thoreau, with uncanny foresight, believed trees were essential to the preservation of the world.

Thoreau And The Language Of Trees

Author: Richard Higgins
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520967313
Size: 59.57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Trees were central to Henry David Thoreau’s creativity as a writer, his work as a naturalist, his thought, and his inner life. His portraits of them were so perfect, it was as if he could see the sap flowing beneath their bark. When Thoreau wrote that the poet loves the pine tree as his own shadow in the air, he was speaking about himself. In short, he spoke their language. In this original book, Richard Higgins explores Thoreau’s deep connections to trees: his keen perception of them, the joy they gave him, the poetry he saw in them, his philosophical view of them, and how they fed his soul. His lively essays show that trees were a thread connecting all parts of Thoreau’s being—heart, mind, and spirit. Included are one hundred excerpts from Thoreau’s writings about trees, paired with over sixty of the author’s photographs. Thoreau’s words are as vivid now as they were in 1890, when an English naturalist wrote that he was unusually able to “to preserve the flashing forest colors in unfading light.” Thoreau and the Language of Trees shows that Thoreau, with uncanny foresight, believed trees were essential to the preservation of the world.

Henry David Thoreau

Author: Laura Dassow Walls
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022634472X
Size: 16.32 MB
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“Walden. Yesterday I came here to live.” That entry from the journal of Henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. His attempt to “live deliberately” in a small woods at the edge of his hometown of Concord has been a touchstone for individualists and seekers since the publication of Walden in 1854. But there was much more to Thoreau than his brief experiment in living at Walden Pond. A member of the vibrant intellectual circle centered on his neighbor Ralph Waldo Emerson, he was also an ardent naturalist, a manual laborer and inventor, a radical political activist, and more. Many books have taken up various aspects of Thoreau’s character and achievements, but, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, “Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, many-sided.” Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls restores Henry David Thoreau to us in all his profound, inspiring complexity. Walls traces the full arc of Thoreau’s life, from his early days in the intellectual hothouse of Concord, when the American experiment still felt fresh and precarious, and “America was a family affair, earned by one generation and about to pass to the next.” By the time he died in 1862, at only forty-four years of age, Thoreau had witnessed the transformation of his world from a community of farmers and artisans into a bustling, interconnected commercial nation. What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, wild nature that Thoreau celebrated? Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos. We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part. And, running through it all, Thoreau the passionate naturalist, who, long before the age of environmentalism, saw tragedy for future generations in the human heedlessness around him. “The Thoreau I sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one,” says Walls. The result is a Thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.

Writing Nature

Author: Sharon Cameron
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226092287
Size: 73.12 MB
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At his death, Henry Thoreau left the majority of his writing unpublished. The bulk of this material is a journal that he kept for twenty-four years. Sharon Cameron's major claim is that this private work (the Journal) was Thoreau's primary work, taking precedence over the books that he published in his lifetime. Her controversial thesis views Thoreau's Journal as a composition that confounds the distinction between public and private—the basis on which our conventional treatment of discourse depends.

Searching For Thoreau

Author: Tom Slayton
Publisher: Images from the Past Incorporated
ISBN: 9781884592447
Size: 63.92 MB
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"Ten essays that interweave the author's first-hand experiences and those of the great American writer/naturalist Henry David Thoreau with their respective reflections on the importance of preserving wild places and the causes of change"--Provided by publisher.

Seeing New Worlds

Author: Laura Dassow Walls
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299147433
Size: 68.15 MB
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Thoreau was a poet, a naturalist, a major American writer. Was he also a scientist? He was, Laura Dassow Walls suggests. Her book, the first to consider Thoreau as a serious and committed scientist, will change the way we understand his accomplishment and the place of science in American culture. Walls reveals that the scientific texts of Thoreau’s day deeply influenced his best work, from Walden to the Journal to the late natural history essays. Here we see how, just when literature and science were splitting into the “two cultures” we know now, Thoreau attempted to heal the growing rift. Walls shows how his commitment to Alexander von Humboldt’s scientific approach resulted in not only his “marriage” of poetry and science but also his distinctively patterned nature studies. In the first critical study of his “The Dispersion of Seeds” since its publication in 1993, she exposes evidence that Thoreau was using Darwinian modes of reasoning years before the appearance of Origin of Species. This book offers a powerful argument against the critical tradition that opposes a dry, mechanistic science to a warm, “organic” Romanticism. Instead, Thoreau’s experience reveals the complex interaction between Romanticism and the dynamic, law-seeking science of its day. Drawing on recent work in the theory and philosophy of science as well as literary history and theory, Seeing New Worlds bridges today’s “two cultures” in hopes of stimulating a fuller consideration of representations of nature.

The Spiritual Journal Of Henry David Thoreau

Author: Malcolm Clemens Young
Publisher: Mercer University Press
ISBN: 088146158X
Size: 53.35 MB
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This title explores the religious nature of ""Thoreau's Journal"". Most people who care about nature cannot help but use religious language to describe their experience of it. We can trace many of these conceptions of nature and holiness directly to influential nineteenth-century writers, especially Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862). In Walden, he writes that 'God himself culminates in the present moment', and that in nature we encounter, 'the workman whose work we are'. But what were the sources of his religious convictions about the meaning of nature in human life? As the most comprehensive study of Thoreau's spirituality from a Christian perspective, ""The Spiritual Journal of Henry David Thoreau"" is the first to seriously examine connections between Thoreau's religious practices and those of his Protestant forebears. While a few writers have considered the relation between Thoreau's thought and Christian doctrine, this book instead outlines the links between Thoreau's religious practices (such as keeping a spiritual journal, studying nature, and walking) and those of earlier New England Protestants. This work is also the first study to compare his journal with the spiritual journals of prominent Puritans, Anglicans, Methodists, and Quakers. It is also one of the first books to treat spiritual journals as a distinct literary genre, while comparing theological expectations of nature ranging from the American Puritan Jonathan Edwards to nineteenth-century Romantic walkers and Thoreau's fellow Transcendentalists.

Elevating Ourselves

Author: Henry David Thoreau
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780395947999
Size: 28.44 MB
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"On tops of mountains, as everywhere to hopeful souls, it is always morning", Thoreau wrote. J. Parker Huber is along for the climb, comparing what Thoreau saw in his era to what we can see today. Part of "The Spirit of Thoreau Series". 20-30 drawings by Thoreau.

Learning From Thoreau

Author: Andrew Menard
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820353442
Size: 73.87 MB
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Thoreau And The Art Of Life

Author: Henry David Thoreau
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781556438837
Size: 73.42 MB
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Combines nearly 100 luminous watercolor illustrations with eloquent passages from the writings of the American transcendentalist author and philosopher, in a book that draws largely from Thoreau's journals to reveal his ideas about nature, creativity, spirituality, aging and wisdom. Original.