Those Good Gertrudes

Author: Geraldine J. Clifford
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421419793
Size: 26.35 MB
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Those Good Gertrudes explores the professional, civic, and personal roles of women teachers throughout American history. Its voice, themes, and findings build from the mostly unpublished writings of many women and their families, colleagues, and pupils. Geraldine J. Clifford studied personal history manuscripts in archives and consulted printed autobiographies, diaries, correspondence, oral histories, interviews—even film and fiction—to probe the multifaceted imagery that has surrounded teaching. This broad ranging, inclusive, and comparative work surveys a long past where schoolteaching was essentially men's work, with women relegated to restricted niches such as teaching rudiments of the vernacular language to young children and socializing girls for traditional gender roles. Clifford documents and explains the emergence of women as the prototypical schoolteachers in the United States, a process apparent in the late colonial period and continuing through the nineteenth century, when they became the majority of American public and private schoolteachers. The capstone of Clifford’s distinguished career and the definitive book on women teachers in America, Those Good Gertrudes will engage scholars in the history of education and women’s history, teachers past, present, and future, and readers with vivid memories of their own teachers. "Clifford's book is a timely blessing, the history of teachers are at last accorded their own integrity instead of as appendages in other fields of study."— San Francisco Book Review "Clifford’s colleagues around the world have long anticipated Those Good Gertrudes. They will find the wait exceedingly worthwhile. The book’s scope and depth can now incite new generations of students to reflect on and investigate the repercussions of teaching and learning—activities still driven essentially by women both in the U.S. and globally."—Donald R. Warren, Indiana University "Those ‘Good Gertrudes’—the women who dedicated some part of their lives to teaching—finally have a great historian to tell this important, missing story. Professor Geraldine J. Clifford has brought together an intense combination of extended research, fresh archival information, and the insightful interpretation that only wisdom can bring to scholarship. This stands as a landmark work in the social history of education."—John R. Thelin, author of A History of American Higher Education The first woman to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for research in education, Geraldine J. Clifford is professor emerita at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Lone Voyagers: Academic Women in Coeducational Institutions, 1870–1937.

The Work Of Teachers In America

Author: Rosetta Marantz Cohen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135459347
Size: 23.35 MB
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This volume presents a complex portrait of the American teacher through a fascinating range of "story" narratives, including fictional short stories, poetry, diaries, letters, ethnographies, and autobiographies. Through these stories, the volume traces the evolution of the teacher and the profession over the course of two centuries -- from the late 1700s to the late 1900s. In depicting the profession over time, the authors include stories by and about both male and female teachers, as well as teachers from a wide range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds, including white, black, Hispanic, Asian-American, immigrant and native-born, and gay and straight. This book offers accessible, comprehensive introductions to both the central ideas associated with each period and to the representative individual stories that are included within it. The volume editors connect each of the parts to earlier and later ones by tracing evolving themes of feminization, teacher activism, conceptions of curriculum and discipline, and issues of multiculturalism. Questions, suggested readings, and activities are offered at the end of each section. Photographs and drawings -- retrieved from state historical archives -- provide telling images of the teacher in each of the four periods.

The Work And Lives Of Teachers

Author: Rosetta Marantz Cohen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316943119
Size: 55.39 MB
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The Work and Lives of Teachers offers a simple but original argument: that the cultural attitudes toward the teaching profession measurably influence how students perform. Cohen uses both ethnographic portraits and personal accounts from teachers for several countries to explore the meaning and value of teaching worldwide. This study includes the ways in which teachers in these countries are educated, recruited, compensated, and perceived by parents, students, administrators, and the culture at large. Teachers' voices, so rarely heard in international educational studies, are front and center here, highlighting the daily work in the classroom and the pleasures and struggles of engaging in today's teaching profession. The lesson, briefly stated, is that societies are only as good as the people who teach in them.

The Principal S Office

Author: Kate Rousmaniere
Publisher: SUNYPress
ISBN: 1438448236
Size: 33.26 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The first comprehensive history of principals in the United States. The Principal’s Office is the first historical examination of one of the most important figures in American education. Originating as a head teacher in the nineteenth century and evolving into the role of contemporary educational leader, the school principal has played a central part in the development of American public education. A local leader who not only manages the daily needs of the school but also represents district and state officials, the school principal is the connecting hinge between classroom practice and educational policy. Kate Rousmaniere explores the cultural, economic, and political pressures that have impacted school leadership over time and considers professionalization, the experiences of women and people of color, and progressive community initiatives. She discusses the intersections between the role of the school principal with larger movements for civil rights, parental and community activism, and education reform. The school principal emerges as a dynamic character in the center of the educational enterprise, ever maneuvering between multiple constituencies, responding to technical and bureaucratic demands, and enacting different leadership strategies. By focusing on the historic development of school leadership, this book provides insights into the possibilities of school improvement for contemporary school leaders and reformers.

Portrait Of A Profession

Author: Wendy J. Glenn
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275982188
Size: 52.36 MB
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Offering an inside look at the hidden dimensions of teaching, this provocative text presents insight into, and analysis of, the work of teaching--from preparing teachers and their daily work to the influence of public policy on the profession.

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Author: James W. Loewen
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 162097455X
Size: 33.15 MB
Format: PDF
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“Every teacher, every student of history, every citizen should read this book. It is both a refreshing antidote to what has passed for history in our educational system and a one-volume education in itself.” —Howard Zinn A new edition of the national bestseller and American Book Award winner, with a new preface by the author Since its first publication in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me has become one of the most important—and successful—history books of our time. Having sold nearly two million copies, the book also won an American Book Award and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship and was heralded on the front page of the New York Times in the summer of 2006. For this new edition, Loewen has added a new preface that shows how inadequate history courses in high school help produce adult Americans who think Donald Trump can solve their problems, and calls out academic historians for abandoning the concept of truth in a misguided effort to be “objective.” What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the San Francisco Chronicle calls “an extremely convincing plea for truth in education.” In Lies My Teacher Told Me, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, the My Lai massacre, 9/11, and the Iraq War, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should—and could—be taught to American students.

The Lessons Of History

Author: Will Durant
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439170193
Size: 12.21 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A concise survey of the culture and civilization of mankind, The Lessons of History is the result of a lifetime of research from Pulitzer Prize–winning historians Will and Ariel Durant. With their accessible compendium of philosophy and social progress, the Durants take us on a journey through history, exploring the possibilities and limitations of humanity over time. Juxtaposing the great lives, ideas, and accomplishments with cycles of war and conquest, the Durants reveal the towering themes of history and give meaning to our own.

How Students Learn

Author: Committee on How People Learn: A Targeted Report for Teachers
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309089506
Size: 53.47 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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How Students Learn: Science in the Classroom builds on the discoveries detailed in the best-selling How People Learn. Now these findings are presented in a way that teachers can use immediately, to revitalize their work in the classroom for even greater effectiveness. Organized for utility, the book explores how the principles of learning can be applied in science at three levels: elementary, middle, and high school. Leading educators explain in detail how they developed successful curricula and teaching approaches, presenting strategies that serve as models for curriculum development and classroom instruction. Their recounting of personal teaching experiences lends strength and warmth to this volume. This book discusses how to build straightforward science experiments into true understanding of scientific principles. It also features illustrated suggestions for classroom activities.

A People S History Of The United States

Author: Howard Zinn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317325303
Size: 59.36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.