The War On Drugs

Author: Paula Mallea
Publisher: Dundurn.com
ISBN: 1459722914
Size: 67.43 MB
Format: PDF
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A criminal prosecutor discusses the illegal drug trade and the failure of the so-called “War on Drugs” to stop it. In 1971, President Richard Nixon coined the term “War on Drugs.” His campaign to eradicate illegal drug use was picked up by the media and championed by succeeding presidents, including Reagan. Canada was a willing ally in this “war,” and is currently cracking down on drug offences at a time when even the U.S. is beginning to climb down from its reliance on incarceration. Elsewhere in the world, there has been a sea change. The Global Commission on Drug Policy, including international luminaries like Kofi Annan, declared that the War on Drugs “has not, and cannot, be won.” Former heads of state and drug warriors have come out in favour of this perspective. Former presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton agree with legions of public health officials, scientists, politicians, and police officers that a new approach is essential. Paula Mallea, in The War on Drugs, approaches this issue from a variety of points of view, offering insight into the history of drug use and abuse in the twentieth century; the pharmacology of illegal drugs; the economy of the illegal drug trade; and the complete lack of success that the war on drugs has had on drug cartels and the drug supply. She also looks ahead and discusses what can and is being done in Canada, the U.S., and the rest of the world to move on from the “war” and find better ways to address the issue of illegal drugs and their distribution, use, and abuse.

The War On Drugs

Author: Paula Mallea
Publisher: Dundurn.com
ISBN: 1459722906
Size: 25.65 MB
Format: PDF
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Explores the spectacular failure of the war on drugs to weaken drug cartels and the illegal drug supply, as well as the modern history of drug use and abuse, the pharmacology of illegal drugs, and the economy of the illegal drug trade.

The War On Drugs

Author: Paula Mallea
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781525236549
Size: 44.81 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Explores the spectacular failure of the war on drugs to weaken drug cartels and the illegal drug supply, as well as the modern history of drug use and abuse, the pharmacology of illegal drugs, and the economy of the illegal drug trade.

Ending The War On Drugs

Author: Dirk Chase Eldredge
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1882593383
Size: 21.16 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The author, a conservative Republican, examines why America is losing the war on drugs-and makes a case for controlled legalization.

Chasing The Scream

Author: Johann Hari
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1620408929
Size: 49.22 MB
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What if everything we think we know about addiction is wrong? Johann Hari's TED talk on this subject – and the animation based on it – have been viewed more than 20 million times, and this New York Times best-selling book takes you on the remarkable journey that led him to uncovering these breakthroughs. One of Hari's earliest memories is of trying to wake up one of his relatives and not being able to. He didn't understand why then, but as he got older, he realised he had addiction in his family. He wanted to understand what really causes addiction – and how to find our way back from it. So he set off on an epic three-year, thirty-thousand mile journey into the war on drugs and addiction. He discovered that nothing on this subject is what we have been told it is – and the solutions are there, waiting for us, if only we are ready to see them.

Smoke And Mirrors

Author: Dan Baum
Publisher: Little Brown
ISBN: 9780316084123
Size: 75.59 MB
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Argues that despite increasing levels of government action, illicit drugs are more readily available than ever, and analyzes the failure of our drug policy

Drug Crazy

Author: Mike Gray
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415926478
Size: 24.52 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Over the last fifteen years, American taxpayers have spent over $300 billion to wage the war on drugs--three times what it cost to put a man on the moon. In Drug Crazy, journalist Mike Gray offers a scathing indictment of this financial fiasco, chronicling a series of expensive and hypocritical follies that have benefited only two groups: professional anti-drug advocates and drug lords. The facts are alarming. More than twenty-five years ago, a presidential committee determined that marijuana is neither an addictive substance nor a "stepping stone" to harder drugs, but the embarrassing final report was shelved by a government already heavily invested in "the war against drugs". Many medical experts recommend simply prescribing drugs to addicts, and communities that have done this report a lower crime rate and reduced unemployment among drug users. In a riveting account of how we got to this impasse-- discriminatory policies, demonization of users, grandstanding among both lawmakers and lawbreakers -- conventional wisdom is turned on its head. Rather than a planned assault on the scourge of addiction, the drug war has happened almost by accident and has been continually exploited by political opportunists. A gripping account of the violence, corruption, and chaos characterizing the drug war since its inception, Mike Gray's incisive narrative launches a frontal attack on America's drug orthodoxy. His overview of the battlefield makes it clear that this urgent debate must begin now.

Unequal Under Law

Author: Doris Marie Provine
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226684784
Size: 16.83 MB
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Race is clearly a factor in government efforts to control dangerous drugs, but the precise ways that race affects drug laws remain difficult to pinpoint. Illuminating this elusive relationship, Unequal under Law lays out how decades of both manifest and latent racism helped shape a punitive U.S. drug policy whose onerous impact on racial minorities has been willfully ignored by Congress and the courts. Doris Marie Provine’s engaging analysis traces the history of race in anti-drug efforts from the temperance movement of the early 1900s to the crack scare of the late twentieth century, showing how campaigns to criminalize drug use have always conjured images of feared minorities. Explaining how alarm over a threatening black drug trade fueled support in the 1980s for a mandatory minimum sentencing scheme of unprecedented severity, Provine contends that while our drug laws may no longer be racist by design, they remain racist in design. Moreover, their racial origins have long been ignored by every branch of government. This dangerous denial threatens our constitutional guarantee of equal protection of law and mutes a much-needed national discussion about institutionalized racism—a discussion that Unequal under Law promises to initiate.

Off The Street

Author: W.A. Bogart
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1459734998
Size: 68.33 MB
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An unflinching analysis of one of the major issues of our time — the shift from criminalization to regulation of recreational drugs. The “war on drugs” has failed. The cost of trying to control the production, sale, and use of recreational drugs through the criminal law is too high: unjust incarceration, illicit markets, tainted substances, exploited children, and an untaxed industry. But there is an alternative. The watchwords for governments controlling the consumption of alcohol, tobacco, junk food, and gambling are “permit but discourage.” All are legal, but harmful consumption is decreased by targeted regulatory strategies. That same approach should be adopted for drugs. Legalization and regulation can attack the underground economy, drive down excessive use, provide revenue for prevention, treatment, and counselling, and better protect children. Off the Street: Legalizing Drugs calls for a thoughtful, national discussion of the legalization and regulation of recreational drugs — the “least bad” way forward.

The War On Alcohol Prohibition And The Rise Of The American State

Author: Lisa McGirr
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393248798
Size: 56.56 MB
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“[This] fine history of Prohibition . . . could have a major impact on how we read American political history.”—James A. Morone, New York Times Book Review Prohibition has long been portrayed as a “noble experiment” that failed, a newsreel story of glamorous gangsters, flappers, and speakeasies. Now at last Lisa McGirr dismantles this cherished myth to reveal a much more significant history. Prohibition was the seedbed for a pivotal expansion of the federal government, the genesis of our contemporary penal state. Her deeply researched, eye-opening account uncovers patterns of enforcement still familiar today: the war on alcohol was waged disproportionately in African American, immigrant, and poor white communities. Alongside Jim Crow and other discriminatory laws, Prohibition brought coercion into everyday life and even into private homes. Its targets coalesced into an electoral base of urban, working-class voters that propelled FDR to the White House. This outstanding history also reveals a new genome for the activist American state, one that shows the DNA of the right as well as the left. It was Herbert Hoover who built the extensive penal apparatus used by the federal government to combat the crime spawned by Prohibition. The subsequent federal wars on crime, on drugs, and on terror all display the inheritances of the war on alcohol. McGirr shows the powerful American state to be a bipartisan creation, a legacy not only of the New Deal and the Great Society but also of Prohibition and its progeny. The War on Alcohol is history at its best—original, authoritative, and illuminating of our past and its continuing presence today.