The Animal Connection A New Perspective On What Makes Us Human

Author: Pat Shipman
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393082229
Size: 63.78 MB
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A bold, illuminating new take on the love of animals that drove human evolution. Why do humans all over the world take in and nurture other animals? This behavior might seem maladaptive—after all, every mouthful given to another species is one that you cannot eat—but in this heartening new study, acclaimed anthropologist Pat Shipman reveals that our propensity to domesticate and care for other animals is in fact among our species' greatest strengths. For the last 2.6 million years, Shipman explains, humans who coexisted with animals enjoyed definite adaptive and cultural advantages. To illustrate this point, Shipman gives us a tour of the milestones in human civilization-from agriculture to art and even language—and describes how we reached each stage through our unique relationship with other animals. The Animal Connection reaffirms our love of animals as something both innate and distinctly human, revealing that the process of domestication not only changed animals but had a resounding impact on us as well.

State And Society

Author: John Gledhill
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 0415122554
Size: 36.38 MB
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The traditional Eurocentric view of state formation and the rise of civilisations is vigorously challenged in this broad-ranging and innovative volume. By bringing archaeological research into contact with the work of ethno-historians and anthropologists, and by constantly challenging trends in interpretation, State and Society offers analyses of political centralization and resistance to it in a diverse range of historical and geographical contexts.

Looking At Animals In Human History

Author: Linda Kalof
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 9781861893345
Size: 49.50 MB
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Taking in a wide range of visual and textual materials, Linda Kalof in Looking at Animals in Human History unearths many surprising and revealing examples of our depictions of animals.

Hybrid Geographies

Author: Sarah Whatmore
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1847876781
Size: 18.72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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`Hybrid Geographies is one of the most original and important contributions to our field in the last 30 years. At once immensley provocative and productive, it is written with uncommon clarity and grace, and promises to breathe new life not only into geographical inquiry but into critical practice across the spectrum of the humanities and social sciences - and beyond. An extraordinary achievement' - Professor Derek Gregory, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia Hybrid Geographies critically examines the `opposition' between nature and culture, the material and the social, as represented in scientific, environmental and popular discourses. Demonstrating that the world is not an exclusively human achievement, Hybrid Geographies reconsiders the relation between human and non-human, the social and the material, showing how they are intimately and variously linked. General arguments - informed by work in critical geography, feminist theory, environmental ethics, and science studies - are illustrated throughout with detailed case-study material. This exemplifies the two core themes of the book: a consideration of hybridity (the human/non-human relation) and of the `fault-lines' in the spatial organization of society and nature. Hybrid Geographies is essential reading for students in the social sciences with an interest in nature, space and social theory.

Archaeology At The Millennium

Author: Gary M. Feinman
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 038772611X
Size: 27.88 MB
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In this book an internationally distinguished roster of contributors considers the state of the art of the discipline of archaeology at the turn of the 21st century and charts an ambitious agenda for the future. The chapters address a wide range of topics including, paradigms, practice, and relevance of the discipline; paleoanthropology; fully modern humans; holocene hunter-gatherers; the transition to food and craft production; social inequality; warfare; state and empire formation; and the uneasy relationship between classical and anthropological archaeology.

Encyclopedia Of Prehistory

Author: Peter N. Peregrine
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461511933
Size: 42.37 MB
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The Encyclopedia of Prehistory represents also defined by a somewhat different set of an attempt to provide basic information sociocultural characteristics than are eth on all archaeologically known cultures, nological cultures. Major traditions are covering the entire globe and the entire defined based on common subsistence prehistory of humankind. It is designed as practices, sociopolitical organization, and a tool to assist in doing comparative material industries, but language, ideology, research on the peoples of the past. Most and kinship ties play little or no part in of the entries are written by the world's their definition because they are virtually foremost experts on the particular areas unrecoverable from archaeological con and time periods. texts. In contrast, language, ideology, and The Encyclopedia is organized accord kinship ties are central to defining ethno ing to major traditions. A major tradition logical cultures. is defined as a group of populations sharing There are three types of entries in the similar subsistence practices, technology, Encyclopedia: the major tradition entry, and forms of sociopolitical organization, the regional sub tradition entry, and the which are spatially contiguous over a rela site entry. Each contains different types of tively large area and which endure tempo information, and each is intended to be rally for a relatively long period. Minimal used in a different way.

The Paradigm Of International Social Development

Author: Murli Desai
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135010250
Size: 54.92 MB
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This book takes a historical approach to analyse ideologies, policy approaches and development systems that have constructed the paradigm of international social development. It aims to review the social construction of "development" by tracing the historical dynamics of the modern ideologies and political economy of industrialization, colonization, the Cold War, and globalisation; to examine the process of reconstruction of development as "social development" based on alternate ideologies and alternate policy approaches and review the roles played by the development systems; and to trace the history of social policy approaches from welfare to rights-based, universal, comprehensive and preventative social policies for social development, and identify the roles played by non-government organizations and the social work profession.

Anthropology And Economy

Author: Stephen Gudeman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316462749
Size: 24.66 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Comparative and critical, Anthropology and Economy offers a uniquely cross-cultural view of economy. Using examples from market and non-market situations, the book shows how economies are built on five increasingly abstract spheres, from the house to community, commerce, finance, and meta-finance. Across these spheres, economy incorporates a tension between self-interested rationality and the mutuality of social relationships. Even when rational processes predominate, as in markets, economies rely on sociability and ritual to operate, whether as cronyism, pleas to divinities or the magical persuasions of advertising. Drawing on data and concepts from anthropology and economics, the book addresses wealth inequality, resource depletion, and environmental devastation especially in capitalism, providing an understanding of their persistence and ideas for controlling them. Given the recent financial crash, Gudeman offers a different understanding of the crisis and suggestions for achieving greater economic stability.

Time Process And Structured Transformation In Archaeology

Author: James McGlade
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134524951
Size: 21.30 MB
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In a discipline which essentially studies how modern man came to be, it is remarkable that there are hardly any conceptual tools to describe change. This is due to the history of the western intellectual and scientific tradition, which for a long time favoured mechanics over dynamics, and the study of stability over that of change. Change was primarily deemed due to external events (in archaeology mainly climatic or 'environmental'). Revolutionary innovations in the natural and life sciences, often (erroneously) referred to as 'chaos theory', suggest that there are ways to overcome this problem. A wide range of processes can be described in terms of dynamic systems, and modern computing methods enable us to investigate many of their properties. This volume presents a cogent argument for the use of such approaches, and a discussion of a number of its aspects by a range of scientists from the humanities, social and natural sciences, and archaeology.