The Twilight Of The American Enlightenment

Author: George Marsden
Publisher: Basic Books (AZ)
ISBN: 0465030106
Size: 65.95 MB
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In the aftermath of World War II, the United States stood at a precipice. The forces of modernity unleashed by the war had led to astonishing advances in daily life, but technology and mass culture also threatened to erode the country’s traditional moral character. As award-winning historian George M. Marsden explains in The Twilight of the American Enlightenment, postwar Americans looked to the country’s secular, liberal elites for guidance in this precarious time, but these intellectuals proved unable to articulate a coherent common cause by which America could chart its course. Their failure lost them the faith of their constituents, paving the way for a Christian revival that offered America a firm new moral vision—one rooted in the Protestant values of the founders. A groundbreaking reappraisal of the country’s spiritual reawakening, The Twilight of the American Enlightenment shows how America found new purpose at the dawn of the Cold War.

The Twilight Of The American Enlightenment

Author: George Marsden
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465069770
Size: 72.11 MB
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"In The Twilight of the American Enlightenment, Bancroft Prize-winning historian George Marsden examines the faltering attempts by the country's brightest minds to establish a new national identity and purpose for postwar America, and explains how their efforts--and eventual failure--helped to shape the society we live in today. As Marsden shows, the nation's challenges heavily influenced political debates and American art during the 1950s. Playwrights and novelists in particular reflected on the simultaneous conformity and alienation of modern man, with authors such as Dwight MacDonald and James Baldwin lamenting the new "mass man," whom mass media had robbed of all individualism. So too did sociologists Erich Fromm and David Riesman, whose idea of a "lonely crowd" seemed to sum up the inauthenticity of mainstream America. Political philosophers including Walter Lippmann, meanwhile, feared that the pragmatism of thinkers such as Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. and Daniel Bell--who rejected wholesale ideologies in favor of a relativistic, selective politics--had left the nation directionless at a crucial moment in American history"--

The Twilight Of The American Enlightenment

Author: George Marsden
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0465069770
Size: 16.67 MB
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In the aftermath of World War II, the United States stood at a precipice. The forces of modernity unleashed by the war had led to astonishing advances in daily life, but technology and mass culture also threatened to erode the country's traditional moral character. As award-winning historian George M. Marsden explains in [Title TK], postwar Americans looked to the country's secular, liberal elites for guidance in this precarious time, but these intellectuals proved unable to articulate a coherent common cause by which America could chart its course. Their failure lost them the faith of their constituents, paving the way for a Christian revival that offered America a firm new moral vision—one rooted in the Protestant values of the founders. A groundbreaking reappraisal of the country's spiritual reawakening, [Title TK] shows how America found new purpose at the dawn of the Cold War.

Apostles Of Reason

Author: Assistant Professor of History Molly Worthen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190630515
Size: 25.37 MB
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Evangelical Christianity is a paradox. Evangelicals are radically individualist, but devoted to community and family. They believe in the transformative power of a personal relationship with God, but are wary of religious enthusiasm. They are deeply skeptical of secular reason, but eager to find scientific proof that the Bible is true. In this groundbreaking history of modern American evangelicalism, Molly Worthen argues that these contradictions are the products of a crisis of authority that lies at the heart of the faith. Evangelicals have never had a single authority to guide them through these dilemmas or settle the troublesome question of what the Bible actually means. Worthen chronicles the ideological warfare, institutional conflict, and clashes between modern gurus and maverick disciples that lurk behind the more familiar narrative of the rise of the Christian Right. The result is an ambitious intellectual history that weaves together stories from all corners of the evangelical world to explain the ideas and personalities-the scholarly ambitions and anti-intellectual impulses-that have made evangelicalism a cultural and political force. In Apostles of Reason, Worthen recasts American evangelicalism as a movement defined not by shared doctrines or politics, but by the problem of reconciling head knowledge and heart religion in an increasingly secular America. She shows that understanding the rise of the Christian Right in purely political terms, as most scholars have done, misses the heart of the story. The culture wars of the late twentieth century emerged not only from the struggle between religious conservatives and secular liberals, but also from the civil war within evangelicalism itself-a battle over how to uphold the commands of both faith and reason, and how ultimately to lead the nation back onto the path of righteousness.

Religion And American Culture

Author: George M. Marsden
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company
ISBN:
Size: 67.51 MB
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RELIGION AND AMERICAN CULTURE focuses on the relationship of religion to the social and cultural dynamics of American history. Because most survey texts provide only brief coverage of this topic, Marsden's narrative is designed to explore the role of religion in American culture.

An Anxious Age

Author: Joseph Bottum
Publisher: Image
ISBN: 0385521464
Size: 74.39 MB
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We live in a profoundly spiritual age, but not in any good way. Huge swaths of American culture are driven by manic spiritual anxiety and relentless supernatural worry. Radicals and traditionalists, liberals and conservatives, together with politicians, artists, environmentalists, followers of food fads, and the chattering classes of television commentators: America is filled with people frantically seeking confirmation of their own essential goodness. We are a nation desperate to stand of the side of morality--to know that we are righteous and dwell in the light. In An Anxious Age, Joseph Bottum offers an account of modern America, presented as a morality tale formed by a collision of spiritual disturbances. And the cause, he claims, is the most significant and least noticed historical fact of the last fifty years: the collapse of the mainline Protestant churches that were the source of social consensus and cultural unity. Our dangerous spiritual anxieties, broken loose from the churches that once contained them, now madden everything in American life. Updating The Protestant Ethic and the Sprit of Capitalism, Max Weber's sociological classic, An Anxious Age undertakes two case studies of contemporary social classes adrift in a nation without the religious understandings that gave them meaning. Looking at the college-educated elite he calls "the Poster Children," Bottum sees the post-Protestant heirs of the old mainline Protestant domination of culture: dutiful descendants who claim the high social position of their Christian ancestors even while they reject their ancestors' Christianity. Turning to the Swallows of Capistrano, the Catholics formed by the pontificate of John Paul II, Bottum evaluates the early victories--and later defeats--of the attempt to substitute Catholicism for the dying mainline voice in public life. Sweeping across American intellectual and cultural history, An Anxious Age traces the course of national religion and warns about the strange angels and even stranger demons with which we now wrestle. Insightful and contrarian, wise and unexpected, An Anxious Age ranks among the great modern accounts of American culture. From the Hardcover edition.

Reclaiming American Virtue

Author: Barbara J. Keys Keys
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674726030
Size: 79.15 MB
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The American commitment to promoting human rights abroad emerged in the 1970s as a surprising response to national trauma. In this provocative history, Barbara Keys situates this novel enthusiasm as a reaction to the profound challenge of the Vietnam War and its aftermath. Instead of looking inward for renewal, Americans on the right and the left looked outward for ways to restore America's moral leadership. Conservatives took up the language of Soviet dissidents to resuscitate the Cold War, while liberals sought to dissociate from brutally repressive allies like Chile and South Korea. When Jimmy Carter in 1977 made human rights a central tenet of American foreign policy, his administration struggled to reconcile these conflicting visions. Yet liberals and conservatives both saw human rights as a way of moving from guilt to pride. Less a critique of American power than a rehabilitation of it, human rights functioned for Americans as a sleight of hand that occluded from view much of America's recent past and confined the lessons of Vietnam to narrow parameters. From world's judge to world's policeman was a small step, and American intervention in the name of human rights would be a cause both liberals and conservatives could embrace.

Struggle Condemnation Vindication

Author: Barry Hudock
Publisher: Liturgical Press
ISBN: 0814683479
Size: 11.47 MB
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No American Catholic has had greater impact on the doctrinal beliefs of the Roman Catholic Church than Fr. John Courtney Murray, SJ. With almost no power to wield and not much more fame, Murray influenced Catholic doctrine on religious freedom in a dramatic and almost unparalleled way. He did this through his careful scholarship, courage in the face of powerful opposition, and a delicate balance of faithfulness to tradition with theological creativity. In Struggle, Condemnation, Vindication Barry Hudock tells a true-life theological adventure story, from Murray’s silencing by church authorities to his ultimate vindication at the Second Vatican Council.

Understanding Fundamentalism And Evangelicalism

Author: George Marsden
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 9780802805393
Size: 37.88 MB
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In this historical overview of American fundamentalism and evangelicalism, Marsden provides an introduction to these growing religious movements and a deeper analysis of two themes that have been especially prominent and controversial in these traditions--views of science and views of politics.

Fundamentalism And American Culture

Author: George M. Marsden
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199741120
Size: 73.21 MB
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Many American's today are taking note of the surprisingly strong political force that is the religious right. Controversial decisions by the government are met with hundreds of lobbyists, millions of dollars of advertising spending, and a powerful grassroots response. How has the fundamentalist movement managed to resist the pressures of the scientific community and the draw of modern popular culture to hold on to their ultra-conservative Christian views? Understanding the movement's history is key to answering this question. Fundamentalism and American Culture has long been considered a classic in religious history, and to this day remains unsurpassed. Now available in a new edition, this highly regarded analysis takes us through the full history of the origin and direction of one of America's most influential religious movements. For Marsden, fundamentalists are not just religious conservatives; they are conservatives who are willing to take a stand and to fight. In Marsden's words (borrowed by Jerry Falwell), "a fundamentalist is an evangelical who is angry about something." In the late nineteenth century American Protestantism was gradually dividing between liberals who were accepting new scientific and higher critical views that contradicted the Bible and defenders of the more traditional evangelicalism. By the 1920s a full-fledged "fundamentalist" movement had developed in protest against theological changes in the churches and changing mores in the culture. Building on networks of evangelists, Bible conferences, Bible institutes, and missions agencies, fundamentalists coalesced into a major protest movement that proved to have remarkable staying power. For this new edition, a major new chapter compares fundamentalism since the 1970s to the fundamentalism of the 1920s, looking particularly at the extraordinary growth in political emphasis and power of the more recent movement. Never has it been more important to understand the history of fundamentalism in our rapidly polarizing nation. Marsen's carefully researched and engrossing work remains the best way to do just that.