Rise Of Judicial Management In The U S District Court Southern District Of Texas 1955 2000

Author: Steven Harmon Wilson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820327280
Size: 37.90 MB
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This is the first book-length study of a federal district court to analyze the revolutionary changes in its mission, structure, policies, and procedures over the past four decades. As Steven Harmon Wilson chronicles the court's attempts to keep pace with an expanding, diversifying caseload, he situates those efforts within the social, cultural, and political expectations that have prompted the increase in judicial seats from four in 1955 to the current nineteen. Federal judges have progressed from being simply referees of legal disputes to managers of expanding courts, dockets, and staffs, says Wilson. The Southern District of Texas offers an especially instructive model by which to study this transformation. Not only does it contain a varied population of Hispanics, African Americans, and whites, but its jurisdiction includes an international border and some of the busiest seaports in the United States. Wilson identifies three areas of judicial management in which the shift has most clearly manifested itself. Through docket and case management judges have attempted to rationalize the flow of work through the litigation process. Lastly, and most controversially, judges have sought to bring "constitutionally flawed" institutions into compliance through "structural reform" rulings in areas such as housing, education, employment, and voting. Wilson draws on sources ranging from judicial biography and oral-history interviews to case files, published opinions, and administrative memoranda. Blending legal history with social science, this important new study ponders the changing meaning of federal judgeship as it shows how judicial management has both helped and hindered the resolution of legal conflicts and the protection of civil rights.

2002

Author: Massimo Mastrogregori
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 3110932989
Size: 46.83 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Annually published since 1930, the International bibliography of Historical Sciences (IBOHS) is an international bibliography of the most important historical monographs and periodical articles published throughout the world, which deal with history from the earliest to the most recent times. The works are arranged systematically according to period, region or historical discipline, and within this classification alphabetically. The bibliography contains a geographical index and indexes of persons and authors.

The Judicial Branch Of Federal Government

Author: Charles L. Zelden
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1851097023
Size: 68.54 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Examines the history and daily operations of the courts, discussing their role, pyramid structure, relationship with the other branches of government, important personnel, and key decisions over their two-hundred-year history.

The Borderlands Of Race

Author: Jennifer R. Nájera
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292767579
Size: 43.42 MB
Format: PDF
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Throughout much of the twentieth century, Mexican Americans experienced segregation in many areas of public life, but the structure of Mexican segregation differed from the strict racial divides of the Jim Crow South. Factors such as higher socioeconomic status, lighter skin color, and Anglo cultural fluency allowed some Mexican Americans to gain limited access to the Anglo power structure. Paradoxically, however, this partial assimilation made full desegregation more difficult for the rest of the Mexican American community, which continued to experience informal segregation long after federal and state laws officially ended the practice. In this historical ethnography, Jennifer R. Nájera offers a layered rendering and analysis of Mexican segregation in a South Texas community in the first half of the twentieth century. Using oral histories and local archives, she brings to life Mexican origin peoples' experiences with segregation. Through their stories and supporting documentary evidence, Nájera shows how the ambiguous racial status of Mexican origin people allowed some of them to be exceptions to the rule of Anglo racial dominance. She demonstrates that while such exceptionality might suggest the permeability of the color line, in fact the selective and limited incorporation of Mexicans into Anglo society actually reinforced segregation by creating an illusion that the community had been integrated and no further changes were needed. Nájera also reveals how the actions of everyday people ultimately challenged racial/racist ideologies and created meaningful spaces for Mexicans in spheres historically dominated by Anglos.

America History And Life

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 46.20 MB
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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

Forthcoming Books

Author: R.R. Bowker Company. Department of Bibliography
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 53.53 MB
Format: PDF
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