The Red Hills Of Florida 1528 1865

Author: Clifton Paisley
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817304126
Size: 18.89 MB
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The Red Hills section of northern Florida is composed of Leon County, where Tallahassee is located , and its neighboring counties of Gadsden and Jackson to the west and Jefferson and Madison to the east. The land is distinctive band of rolling red clay hills that extends for 150 miles along the border of Alabama and Georgia. This well-written narrative chronicles the history of the region from the time of first European contact in 1528 through the end of the Civil War, and provides a comprehensive study of this vital section of northern Florida. Recent excavation of the Tallahassee area provided anthropological and archaeological evidence showing that the Red Hills of Florida were sought out by agricultural Indians long before European contact. DeSoto fed his army of more that 700 during the winter of 1539-40 from corn gathered within a few miles of the principal town of the Apalachee. The Spaniards who settled in the Apalachee area during the mission era depended on the corn for survival and used the Indians of the 14 Apalachee mission in a war of empire building with the English of South Carolina. Raids by these enemies wiped out the Indians of the Apalachee area and its mission in 1704. In 1818 Andrew Jackson defeated the successors of the Apalachee in the Red Hills, the Seminoles, and after Florida became American territory in 1821, Governor Du Val planned the town of Tallahassee near the original DeSoto winter campsite. Farsighted Du Val used a site plan that provide for future expansion. Farmers were shipping cotton from the region as early as 1820, but the full development of the plantation economy had to await the removal of the Seminoles. From the 1840s through the Civil War cotton was the major crop which supported the social, political, and economic growth of this pivotal area of north Florida know as the Red Hills.

Environmental History And The American South

Author: Paul Sutter
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820332801
Size: 14.35 MB
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This reader gathers fifteen of the most important essays written in the field of southern environmental history over the past decade. Ideal for course use, the volume provides a convenient entrée into the recent literature on the region as it indicates the variety of directions in which the field is growing. As coeditor Paul S. Sutter writes in his introduction, “recent trends in environmental historiography--a renewed emphasis on agricultural landscapes and their hybridity, attention to the social and racial histories of environmental thought and practice, and connections between health and the environment among them--have made the South newly attractive terrain. This volume suggests, then, that southern environmental history has not only arrived but also that it may prove an important space for the growth of the larger environmental history enterprise.” The writings, which range in setting from the Texas plains to the Carolina Lowcountry, address a multiplicity of topics, such as husbandry practices in the Chesapeake colonies and the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew. The contributors’ varied disciplinary perspectives--including agricultural history, geography, the history of science, the history of technology, military history, colonial American history, urban and regional planning history, and ethnohistory--also point to the field’s vitality. Conveying the breadth, diversity, and liveliness of this maturing area of study, Environmental History and the American South affirms the critical importance of human-environmental interactions to the history and culture of the region. Contributors: Virginia DeJohn Anderson William Boyd Lisa Brady Joshua Blu Buhs Judith Carney James Taylor Carson Craig E. Colten S. Max Edelson Jack Temple Kirby Ralph H. Lutts Eileen Maura McGurty Ted Steinberg Mart Stewart Claire Strom Paul Sutter Harry Watson Albert G. Way

Wiregrass Country

Author: Jerrilyn McGregory
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 0878059261
Size: 11.47 MB
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Wiregrass (Aristida stricta) refers to a genus of flora that depends on fire ecology for germination. Although its growth is widespread from the Chesapeake Bay to the western brim of Texas, only one region has acquired the word for vernacular recognition. Ranging over parts of three states, Wiregrass Country extends from north of Savannah, sweeps across rolling meadows into the southwest Georgia coastal plain, fans over into the southeastern corner of Alabama, and dips into the northwestern panhandle of Florida. This book is the first comprehensive study of the folklife of this unique region and its people. Historically underpopulated, economically poor, and predominantly white until the Reconstruction period following the Civil War, Wiregrass Country is a rare stretch of the American South whose economic and cultural development has been shaped more by yeomen farming and frontier attitudes than by King Cotton, plantations, slave-holders, and slaves. Eventually, Wiregrass Country experienced a more diverse influx or residents--tenant farmers, African Americans, and northern industrialists. In many ways, however, it has remained characteristically rural. Few malls have invaded it, and high watertowers are more prevalent than stately court houses and city halls. This study typifies the population within the tristate region as communal-minded, frugal, and hardworking. Its values gain full expression in characteristic musical and verbal arts, such as Sacred Harp singing and personal narratives about the supernatural. Although virtually neglected by historians and folklorists, the region is a trove of cultural history preserved in folktales, music, festivals, yardscapes, hunting, and fishing.

Best Backroads Of Florida Beaches And Hills

Author: Douglas Waitley
Publisher: Pineapple Press Inc
ISBN: 1561642835
Size: 17.62 MB
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Takes readers on a tour through the backroads of Florida, providing directions, maps, and recommended sights.

Creating An Old South

Author: Edward E. Baptist
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807860034
Size: 51.56 MB
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Set on the antebellum southern frontier, this book uses the history of two counties in Florida's panhandle to tell the story of the migrations, disruptions, and settlements that made the plantation South. Soon after the United States acquired Florida from Spain in 1821, migrants from older southern states began settling the land that became Jackson and Leon Counties. Slaves, torn from family and community, were forced to carve plantations from the woods of Middle Florida, while planters and less wealthy white men battled over the social, political, and economic institutions of their new society. Conflict between white men became full-scale crisis in the 1840s, but when sectional conflict seemed to threaten slavery, the whites of Middle Florida found common ground. In politics and everyday encounters, they enshrined the ideal of white male equality--and black inequality. To mask their painful memories of crisis, the planter elite told themselves that their society had been transplanted from older states without conflict. But this myth of an "Old," changeless South only papered over the struggles that transformed slave society in the course of its expansion. In fact, that myth continues to shroud from our view the plantation frontier, the very engine of conflict that had led to the myth's creation.

Florida S Antebellum Homes

Author: Lewis Nicholas Wynne
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738516171
Size: 60.70 MB
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Florida's antebellum architecture reflects the state's singular history and the realities faced and enjoyed by her early citizens. Threats from Native Americans dictated that the homes of early frontiersmen incorporate in their design defensive features, and many felt the need to locate within small towns. Many planters held close family and business ties with the older, more established South, which encouraged elaborate homes that could easily fit into the plantation architecture of South Carolina, Georgia, or Mississippi. Influences from the state's two ruling countries-Spain and England-also gave way to unique design. Florida's Antebellum Homes features images of buildings that incorporate various combinations of these design features. In addition, some of the public structures shown here reflect the emerging senses of personal affluence, civic pride, and political development. Unfortunately, some of these buildings no longer exist; they fell prey to natural catastrophes, unbridled expansion, and the relentless march of Florida's exacting climate. Many, however, remain in pristine condition and invite the public to appreciate them today, much as earlier Floridians reveled in their stateliness.

Historic Plantations Of Northeast Florida

Author: Donald D. Spencer
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780892183623
Size: 22.30 MB
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Northeast Florida, the people who settled here and the towns they built, played a significant role in the development of the "Sunshine State." During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries many hundreds of plantations were established by settlers along the waterways of Northeast Florida. This book describes some of the early plantation history of this area. Through over 350 alphabetical entries, and 328 photographs and illustrations, Historic Plantations Of Northeast Florida portrays the important plantation sites and activities. It offers a glimpse at some of the events that played a role in colonial plantation life, from the government changes to Indian wars. In these pages you will read about interesting plantation owners like Joseph M. Hernandez and Zephaniah Kingsley, historic Sugar Mills at the Bulow and Dunlawton Plantations, the tragedy of the Seminole wars, and the horror of plantation slave life.

Slavery And Plantation Growth In Antebellum Florida 1821 1860

Author: Julia Floyd Smith
Publisher: Florida and the Caribbean Open
ISBN: 9781947372627
Size: 22.29 MB
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The books in the Florida and the Caribbean Open Books Series demonstrate the University Press of Florida's long history of publishing Latin American and Caribbean studies titles that connect in and through Florida, highlighting the connections between the Sunshine State and its neighboring islands. Books in this series show how early explorers found and settled Florida and the Caribbean. They tell the tales of early pioneers, both foreign and domestic. They examine topics critical to the area such as travel, migration, economic opportunity, and tourism. They look at the growth of Florida and the Caribbean and the attendant pressures on the environment, culture, urban development, and the movement of peoples, both forced and voluntary. The Florida and the Caribbean Open Books Series gathers the rich data available in these architectural, archaeological, cultural, and historical works, as well as the travelogues and naturalists' sketches of the area in prior to the twentieth century, making it accessible for scholars and the general public alike. The Florida and the Caribbean Open Books Series is made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, under the Humanities Open Books program.

Tallahassee

Author: Julianne Hare
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738523712
Size: 14.69 MB
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"Chronicles the story of the city's growth from a frontier community into a modern Southern metropolis"--Back cover.