The Neoconservative Revolution

Author: Murray Friedman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521545013
Size: 47.68 MB
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This book which will come as a surprise to many educated observers and historians suggests that Jews and Jewish intellectuals have played a considerable role in the development and shaping of modern American conservatism. The focus is on the rise of a group of Jewish intellectuals and activists known as neoconservatives who began to impact on American public policy during the Cold War with the Soviet Union and most recently in the lead up to and invasion of Iraq. It presents a portrait of the life and work of the original and small group of neocons including Irving Kristol, Norman Podhoretz, and Sidney Hook. This group has grown into a new generation who operate as columnists in conservative think tanks like The Heritage and The American Enterprise Institute, at colleges and universities, and in government in the second Bush Administration including such lightning rod figures as Paul Wolfowitz, Richard Perle and Elliot Abrams. The book suggests the neo cons have been so significant in reshaping modern American conservatism and public policy that they constitute a Neoconservative Revolution.

The Protestant Jewish Conundrum

Author: Jonathan Frankel
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199753413
Size: 13.51 MB
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Volume XXIV of the distinguished annual Studies in Contemporary Jewry explores relations between Jews and Protestants in modern times. Far from monolithic, Protestantism has innumerable groupings within it, from the loosely organized Religious Society of Friends to the conservative Evangelicals of the Bible Belt, all of which hold a range of views on theology, social problems, and politics. These views are played out in differing attitudes and relationships between Protestant churches and Jews, Judaism, and the state of Israel. In this volume, established scholars from a variety of disciplines investigate the "Protestant-Jewish conundrum." They provide analysis of the historical framework in which Protestant ideas toward Jews and Judaism were formed from the 16th century onward. Contributors also delve into diverse topics ranging from the attitudes of the Evangelical movement toward Jews and Israel, to Protestant reactions to Mel Gibson's blockbuster film, "The Passion of the Christ." They also address German Protestant behavior during and after the Nazi era and mainstream Protestant attitudes toward the Israeli-Arab conflict. Taken as a whole, this compendium presents discussions and questions central to the ongoing development of Jewish-Protestant relations.

What Went Wrong

Author: Murray Friedman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416576681
Size: 30.40 MB
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From Selma to Crown Heights--what happened to the Black-Jewish civil rights alliance? Murray Friedman recounts for the first time the whole history of the Black-Jewish relationship in America, from colonial times to the present, and shows that this history is far more complex--and conflicted--than historians and revisionists admit.

The Israel Lobby And U S Foreign Policy

Author: John J. Mearsheimer
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9781429932820
Size: 63.16 MB
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The Israel Lobby," by John J. Mearsheimer of the University of Chicago and Stephen M. Walt of Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government, was one of the most controversial articles in recent memory. Originally published in the London Review of Books in March 2006, it provoked both howls of outrage and cheers of gratitude for challenging what had been a taboo issue in America: the impact of the Israel lobby on U.S. foreign policy. Now in a work of major importance, Mearsheimer and Walt deepen and expand their argument and confront recent developments in Lebanon and Iran. They describe the remarkable level of material and diplomatic support that the United States provides to Israel and argues that this support cannot be fully explained on either strategic or moral grounds. This exceptional relationship is due largely to the political influence of a loose coalition of individuals and organizations that actively work to shape U.S. foreign policy in a pro-Israel direction. Mearsheimer and Walt provocatively contend that the lobby has a far-reaching impact on America's posture throughout the Middle East—in Iraq, Iran, Lebanon, and toward the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—and the policies it has encouraged are in neither America's national interest nor Israel's long-term interest. The lobby's influence also affects America's relationship with important allies and increases dangers that all states face from global jihadist terror. Writing in The New York Review of Books, Michael Massing declared, "Not since Foreign Affairs magazine published Samuel Huntington's ‘The Clash of Civilizations?' in 1993 has an academic essay detonated with such force." The publication of The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy is certain to widen the debate and to be one of the most talked-about books in foreign policy.

Protesting Affirmative Action

Author: Dennis Deslippe
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421403587
Size: 69.63 MB
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In the process of balancing ideals of race and gender equality with competing notions of colorblindness and meritocracy, they even borrowed the language of the civil rights era to make far-reaching claims about equality, justice, and citizenship in their anti-affirmative action rhetoric. The author traces this conflict through compelling case studies of real people and real jobs. He asks what the introduction of affirmative action meant to the careers and livelihoods of Seattle steelworkers, New York asbestos handlers, St. Louis firemen, Detroit policemen, City University of New York academics, and admissions counselors at the University of Washington Law School. Through their experiences, he examines the diverse reactions to affirmative action, concluding that workers had legitimate grievances against its hiring and promotion practices.

Perversion For Profit

Author: Whitney Strub
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231520158
Size: 33.22 MB
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While America is not alone in its ambivalence toward sex and its depictions, the preferences of the nation swing sharply between toleration and censure. This pattern has grown even more pronounced since the 1960s, with the emergence of the New Right and its attack on the "floodtide of filth" that was supposedly sweeping the nation. Antipornography campaigns became the New Right's political capital in the 1960s, laying the groundwork for the "family values" agenda that shifted the country to the right. Perversion for Profit traces the anatomy of this trend and the crucial function of pornography in constructing the New Right agenda, which has emphasized social issues over racial and economic inequality. Conducting his own extensive research, Whitney Strub vividly recreates the debates over obscenity that consumed members of the ACLU in the 1950s and revisits the deployment of obscenity charges against purveyors of gay erotica during the cold war, revealing the differing standards applied to heterosexual and homosexual pornography. He follows the rise of the influential Citizens for Decent Literature during the 1960s and the pivotal events that followed: the sexual revolution, feminist activism, the rise of the gay rights movement, the "porno chic" moment of the early 1970s, and resurgent Christian conservatism, which now shapes public policy far beyond the issue of sexual decency. Strub also examines the ways in which the left failed to mount a serious or sustained counterattack to the New Right's use of pornography as a political tool. As he demonstrates, this failure put the Democratic Party at the mercy of Republican rhetoric. In placing debates about pornography at the forefront of American postwar history, Strub revolutionizes our understanding of sex and American politics.

A Pact With The Devil

Author: Tony Smith
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135086532
Size: 48.42 MB
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Despite the overwhelming opposition on the left to the war in Iraq, many prominent liberals supported the war on humanitarian grounds. They argued that the war would rid the world of a brutal dictator and liberate the Iraqi people from totalitarian oppression, paving the way for a democratic transformation of the country. In A Pact with the Devil Tony Smith deftly traces this undeniable drift in mainstream liberal thinking toward a more militant posture in world affairs with respect to human rights and democracy promotion. Beginning with the Wilsonian quest to ‘make the world safe for democracy’ right up to the present day liberal support for regime change, Smith isolates leading strands of liberal internationalist thinking in order to see how the ‘liberal hawks’ constructed them into a case for American and liberal imperialism in the Middle East. The result is a reflection on an important aspect of the intellectual history of American foreign policy; establishing how a sophisticated group of thinkers came to fashion their recommendations to Washington and working to see what role liberalism may still play in deliberations in the country on its role in world events now that the failure of these ambitions in Iraq seems clear.

Fantasies Of The New Class

Author: Stephen Schryer
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231527470
Size: 78.63 MB
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America's post–World War II prosperity created a boom in higher education, expanding the number of university-educated readers and making a new literary politics possible. Writers began to direct their work toward the growing professional class, and the American public in turn became more open to literary culture. This relationship imbued fiction with a new social and cultural import, allowing authors to envision themselves as unique cultural educators. It also changed the nature of literary representation: writers came to depict social reality as a tissue of ideas produced by knowledge elites. Linking literary and historical trends, Stephen Schryer underscores the exalted fantasies that arose from postwar American writers' new sense of their cultural mission. Hoping to transform capitalism from within, writers and critics tried to cultivate aesthetically attuned professionals who could disrupt the narrow materialism of the bourgeoisie. Reading Don DeLillo, Marge Piercy, Mary McCarthy, Saul Bellow, Ursula K. Le Guin, Ralph Ellison, and Lionel Trilling, among others, Schryer unravels the postwar idea of American literature as a vehicle for instruction, while highlighting both the promise and flaws inherent in this vision.

America At The Crossroads

Author: Francis Fukuyama
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300122534
Size: 26.65 MB
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A prominent former neoconservative and author of "The End of History and the Last Man" explains why the Iraqi war was a mistake and outlines new directions for American foreign policy.