The Neanderthals Rediscovered

Author: Dimitra Papagianni
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780500292044
Size: 29.16 MB
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Presents new information on the evolution and behavior of prehistoric man, describing behavior that is more modern than what has been traditionally attributed to them, including burying their dead, taking care of the sick, hunting and fishing.

The Neanderthals Rediscovered How Modern Science Is Rewriting Their Story

Author: Dimitra Papagianni
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
ISBN: 0500773114
Size: 76.60 MB
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"In the first complete chronological narrative of the species from emergence to extinction...archaeologist Dimitra Papagianni and science historian Michael Morse have shaped a gem." —Nature In recent years, the common perception of the Neanderthals has been transformed, thanks to new discoveries and paradigm-shattering scientific innovations. It turns out that the Neanderthals’ behavior was surprisingly modern: they buried the dead, cared for the sick, hunted large animals in their prime, harvested seafood, and communicated with spoken language. Meanwhile, advances in DNA technologies are compelling us to reassess the Neanderthals’ place in our own past. For hundreds of thousands of years, Neanderthals evolved in Europe parallel to Homo sapiens evolving in Africa, and, when both species made their first forays into Asia, the Neanderthals may even have had the upper hand. In this important volume, Dimitra Papagianni and Michael A. Morse compile the first full chronological narrative of the Neanderthals’ dramatic existence—from their evolution in Europe to their expansion to Siberia, their subsequent extinction, and ultimately their revival in popular novels, cartoons, cult movies, and television commercials.

Neanderthal

Author: Paul Jordan
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 0752494805
Size: 56.15 MB
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The story of Neanderthal man. Was he our direct ancestor, or was he perhaps a more alien figure, genetically very different? This title brings us into the Neanderthal's world, his technology, his way of life, his origins and his relationship with us.

Neanderthal Man

Author: Svante PŠŠbo
Publisher: Basic Books (AZ)
ISBN: 0465020836
Size: 33.64 MB
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An influential geneticist traces his investigation into the genes of humanity's closest evolutionary relatives, explaining what his sequencing of the Neanderthal genome has revealed about their extinction and the origins of modern humans.

The Humans Who Went Extinct

Author: Clive Finlayson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199239193
Size: 66.97 MB
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Originally published in hardcover: Oxford; New York: Oxford Universtiy Press, 2009.

Human Evolution

Author: Camilo J. Cela-Conde
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198567804
Size: 44.15 MB
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This book is intended as a comprehensive overview of hominid evolution, synthesising data and approaches from physical anthropology, genetics, archaeology, psychology and philosophy. Human evolution courses are now widespread and this book has the potential to satisfy the requirements of most, particularly at the advanced undergraduate and graduate level. It is based on a translation, albeit with substantial modification, of a successful Spanish language book.

Masters Of The Planet

Author: Ian Tattersall
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 023010875X
Size: 22.92 MB
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An award-winning Museum of Natural History curator and author of Becoming Human traces the evolution of homo sapiens to demonstrate how they prevailed among other early humans because of their unique cognitive ability, in an account that also explains how their superior mental abilities were acquired. 40,000 first printing.

Lone Survivors

Author: Chris Stringer
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781973896708
Size: 56.15 MB
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Lone Survivors: How We Came to Be the Only Humans on Earth By Chris Stringer

Lone Survivors

Author: Chris Stringer
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1429973447
Size: 65.54 MB
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A leading researcher on human evolution proposes a new and controversial theory of how our species came to be In this groundbreaking and engaging work of science, world-renowned paleoanthropologist Chris Stringer sets out a new theory of humanity's origin, challenging both the multiregionalists (who hold that modern humans developed from ancient ancestors in different parts of the world) and his own "out of Africa" theory, which maintains that humans emerged rapidly in one small part of Africa and then spread to replace all other humans within and outside the continent. Stringer's new theory, based on archeological and genetic evidence, holds that distinct humans coexisted and competed across the African continent—exchanging genes, tools, and behavioral strategies. Stringer draws on analyses of old and new fossils from around the world, DNA studies of Neanderthals (using the full genome map) and other species, and recent archeological digs to unveil his new theory. He shows how the most sensational recent fossil findings fit with his model, and he questions previous concepts (including his own) of modernity and how it evolved. Lone Survivors will be the definitive account of who and what we were, and will change perceptions about our origins and about what it means to be human.

Unlocking The Past

Author: Martin Jones
Publisher: Arcade Pub
ISBN: 9781628724479
Size: 11.66 MB
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In Unlocking the Past, Martin Jones, a leading expert at the forefront of bioarchaeology--the discipline that gave Michael Crichton the premise for Jurassic Park--explains how this pioneering science is rewriting human history and unlocking stories of the past that could never have been told before. For the first time, the building blocks of ancient life--DNA, proteins, and fats that have long been trapped in fossils and earth and rock--have become widely accessible to science. Working at the cutting edge of genetic and other molecular technologies, researchers have been probing the remains of these ancient biomolecules in human skeletons, sediments and fossilized plants, dinosaur bones, and insects trapped in amber. Their amazing discoveries have influenced the archaeological debate at almost every level and continue to reshape our understanding of the past. Devising a molecular clock from a certain area of DNA, scientists were able to determine that all humans descend from one common female ancestor, dubbed "The Mitochondrial Eve," who lived around 150,000 years ago. From molecules recovered through grinding stones and potsherds, they reconstructed ancient diets and posited when such practices as dairying and boiling water for cooking began. They have reconstituted the beer left in the burial chamber of pharaohs and know what the Iceman, the five-thousand-year-old hunter found in the Alps in the early nineties, ate before his last journey. Conveying both the excitement of innovative research and the sometimes bruising rough-and-tumble of scientific debate, Jones has written a work of profound importance. Unlocking the Past is science at its most engaging.