The Mexican Outsiders

Author: Martha Menchaca
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292778473
Size: 63.62 MB
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People of Mexican descent and Anglo Americans have lived together in the U.S. Southwest for over a hundred years, yet relations between them remain strained, as shown by recent controversies over social services for undocumented aliens in California. In this study, covering the Spanish colonial period to the present day, Martha Menchaca delves deeply into interethnic relations in Santa Paula, California, to document how the residential, social, and school segregation of Mexican-origin people became institutionalized in a representative California town. Menchaca lived in Santa Paula during the 1980s, and interviews with residents add a vivid human dimension to her book. She argues that social segregation in Santa Paula has evolved into a system of social apartness—that is, a cultural system controlled by Anglo Americans that designates the proper times and places where Mexican-origin people can socially interact with Anglos. This first historical ethnographic case study of a Mexican-origin community will be important reading across a spectrum of disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, race and ethnicity, Latino studies, and American culture.

Encyclopedia Of Local History

Author: Carol Kammen
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742503991
Size: 11.10 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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How is local history thought about? How should it be approached? Through brief, succinct notes and essay-length entries, the Encyclopedia of Local History presents ideas to consider, sources to use, historical fields and trends to explore. It also provides commentary on a number of subjects, including the everyday topics that most local historians encounter. A handy reference tool that no public historian's desk should be without!

The Xaripu Community Across Borders

Author: Manuel Barajas
Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess
ISBN: 0268076243
Size: 66.23 MB
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During the past three decades there have been many studies of transnational migration. Most of the scholarship has focused on one side of the border, one area of labor incorporation, one generation of migrants, and one gender. In this path-breaking book, Manuel Barajas presents the first cross-national, comparative study to examine a Mexican-origin community’s experience with international migration and transnationalism. He presents an extended case study of the Xaripu community, with home bases in both Xaripu, Michoacán, and Stockton, California, and elaborates how various forms of colonialism, institutional biases, and emergent forms of domination have shaped Xaripu labor migration, community formation, and family experiences across the Mexican/U.S. border for over a century. Of special interest are Barajas’s formal and informal interviews within the community, his examination of oral histories, and his participant observation in several locations. Barajas asks, What historical events have shaped the Xaripus’ migration experiences? How have Xaripus been incorporated into the U.S. labor market? How have national inequalities affected their ability to form a community across borders? And how have migration, settlement, and employment experiences affected the family, especially gender relationships, on both sides of the border?

Hispanics In The United States

Author: Laird W. Bergad
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139489623
Size: 45.11 MB
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In 1980 the US government began to systematically collect data on Hispanics. By 2005 the Latino population of the United States had become the nation's largest minority and is projected to comprise about one-third of the total US population in 2050. Utilizing census data and other statistical source materials, this book examines the transformations in the demographic, social, and economic structures of Latino-Americans in the United States between 1980 and 2005. Unlike most other studies, this book presents data on transformations over time, rather than a static portrait of specific topics at particular moments. Latino-Americans are examined over this twenty-five year period in terms of their demographic structures, changing patterns of wealth and poverty, educational attainment, citizenship and voter participation, occupational structures, employment, and unemployment. The result is a detailed socioeconomic portrait by region and over time that indicates the basic patterns that have lead to the formation of a complex national minority group that has become central to US society.

The Latino A Condition

Author: Richard Delgado
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814718949
Size: 72.91 MB
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Addresses the historical origins of Spanish-speaking people in the United States, the rise of stereotypes, the growth of efforts at self-definition, and related matters

Disenchanting Citizenship

Author: Luis F. B. Plascencia
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813553342
Size: 52.57 MB
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Central to contemporary debates in the United States on migration and migrant policy is the idea of citizenship, and—as apparent in the continued debate over Arizona’s immigration law SB 1070—this issue remains a focal point of contention, with a key concern being whether there should be a path to citizenship for “undocumented” migrants. In Disenchanting Citizenship, Luis F. B. Plascencia examines two interrelated issues: U.S. citizenship and the Mexican migrants’ position in the United States. The book explores the meaning of U.S. citizenship through the experience of a unique group of Mexican migrants who were granted Temporary Status under the “legalization” provisions of the 1986 IRCA, attained Lawful Permanent Residency, and later became U.S. citizens. Plascencia integrates an extensive and multifaceted collection of interviews, ethnographic fieldwork, ethno-historical research, and public policy analysis in examining efforts that promote the acquisition of citizenship, the teaching of citizenship classes, and naturalization ceremonies. Ultimately, he unearths citizenship’s root as a Janus-faced construct that encompasses a simultaneous process of inclusion and exclusion. This notion of citizenship is mapped on to the migrant experience, arguing that the acquisition of citizenship can lead to disenchantment with the very status desired. In the end, Plascencia expands our understanding of the dynamics of U.S. citizenship as a form of membership and belonging.

The Evolution Of Deficit Thinking

Author: Richard R. Valencia
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136368434
Size: 40.78 MB
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Deficit thinking refers to the notion that students, particularly low income minority students, fail in school because they and their families experience deficiencies that obstruct the leaning process (e.g. limited intelligence, lack of motivation, inadequate home socialization). Tracing the evolution of deficit thinking, the authors debunk the pseudo-science and offer more plausible explanations of why students fail.

Grounds For Dreaming

Author: Lori A. Flores
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300216386
Size: 61.27 MB
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Known as “The Salad Bowl of the World,” California’s Salinas Valley became an agricultural empire due to the toil of diverse farmworkers, including Latinos. A sweeping critical history of how Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants organized for their rights in the decades leading up to the seminal strikes led by Cesar Chavez, this important work also looks closely at how different groups of Mexicans—U.S. born, bracero, and undocumented—confronted and interacted with one another during this period. An incisive study of labor, migration, race, gender, citizenship, and class, Lori Flores’s first book offers crucial insights for today’s ever-growing U.S. Latino demographic, the farmworker rights movement, and future immigration policy.

Immigrants Out

Author: Juan F. Perea
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814766422
Size: 55.83 MB
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This anthology of original, specially commissioned essays is informed at its core by George Santayana's famous edict that "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Examining the current surge in nativism in light of past waves of anti-immigrant sentiment, the volume takes an unflinchingly critical look at the realities and rhetoric of the new nativism. How does nativism inform our understanding of the Official English movement today? How has the symbolism of the Statue of Liberty evolved since its dedication, and what can she tell us about the American disposition to immigration? What is the relationship between the races of immigrants and the perception of a national immigration crisis? To what extent does today's political discourse resemble past discourse we comfortably identify as nativist?