The Making Of Modern Science

Author: David Knight
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745657990
Size: 75.40 MB
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Of all the inventions of the nineteenth century, the scientist is one of the most striking. In revolutionary France the science student, taught by men active in research, was born; and a generation later, the graduate student doing a PhD emerged in Germany. In 1833 the word 'scientist' was coined; forty years later science (increasingly specialised) was a becoming a profession. Men of science rivalled clerics and critics as sages; they were honoured as national treasures, and buried in state funerals. Their new ideas invigorated the life of the mind. Peripatetic congresses, great exhibitions, museums, technical colleges and laboratories blossomed; and new industries based on chemistry and electricity brought prosperity and power, economic and military. Eighteenth-century steam engines preceded understanding of the physics underlying them; but electric telegraphs and motors were applied science, based upon painstaking interpretation of nature. The ideas, discoveries and inventions of scientists transformed the world: lives were longer and healthier, cities and empires grew, societies became urban rather than agrarian, the local became global. And by the opening years of the twentieth century, science was spreading beyond Europe and North America, and women were beginning to be visible in the ranks of scientists. Bringing together the people, events, and discoveries of this exciting period into a lively narrative, this book will be essential reading both for students of the history of science and for anyone interested in the foundations of the world as we know it today.

A History Of Science In Society Volume Ii

Author: Andrew Ede
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442635061
Size: 15.86 MB
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A History of Science in Society is a concise overview that introduces complex ideas in a non-technical fashion. Ede and Cormack trace the history of the changing place of science in society and explore the link between the pursuit of knowledge and the desire to make that knowledge useful. Volume II covers from the Scientific Revolution until the present day. New topics in this edition include science and the corporate world, the regulation of science and technology, and climate change. New "Connections" features provide in-depth exploration of the ways science and society interconnect. The text is accompanied by 38 colour maps and diagrams, and 4 colour plates highlighting key concepts and events. Essay questions, chapter timelines, a further readings section, and an index provide additional support for students. A companion reader edited by the authors, A History of Science in Society: A Reader, is also available.

Race Science And The Nation

Author: Chris Manias
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135054703
Size: 42.73 MB
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Across the nineteenth century, scholars in Britain, France and the German lands sought to understand their earliest ancestors: the Germanic and Celtic tribes known from classical antiquity, and the newly discovered peoples of prehistory. New fields – philology, archeology and anthropology – interacted, breaking down languages, unearthing artifacts, measuring skulls and recording the customs of "savage" analogues. This was a decidedly national process: disciplines institutionalized on national levels, and their findings seen to have deep implications for the origins of the nation and its "racial composition." However, this operated within broader currents. The wide spread of material and novelty of the methods meant that these approaches formed connections across Europe and beyond, even while national rivalries threatened to tear these networks apart. Race, Science and the Nation follows this tension, offering a simultaneously comparative, cross-national and multi-disciplinary history of the scholarly reconstruction of European prehistory. As well as showing how interaction between disciplines was key to their formation, it makes arguments of keen relevance to studies of racial thought and nationalism. It shows these researches often worked against attempts to present the chaotic multi-layered ancient eras as times of mythic origin. Instead, they argued that the modern nations of Europe were not only diverse, but were products of long processes of social development and "racial" fusion. This book therefore brings to light a formerly unstudied motif of nineteenth-century national consciousness, showing how intellectuals in the era of nation-building themselves drove an idea of their nations being "constructed" from a useable past.

The Power Of Knowledge

Author: Jeremy Black
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 030019854X
Size: 67.16 MB
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Information is power. For more than five hundred years the success or failure of nations has been determined by a country’s ability to acquire knowledge and technical skill and transform them into strength and prosperity. Leading historian Jeremy Black approaches global history from a distinctive perspective, focusing on the relationship between information and society and demonstrating how the understanding and use of information have been the primary factors in the development and character of the modern age. Black suggests that the West’s ascension was a direct result of its institutions and social practices for acquiring, employing, and retaining information and the technology that was ultimately produced. His cogent and well-reasoned analysis looks at cartography and the hardware of communication, armaments and sea power, mercantilism and imperialism, science and astronomy, as well as bureaucracy and the management of information, linking the history of technology with the history of global power while providing important indicators for the future of our world.

A Social History Of American Technology

Author: Ruth Schwartz Cowan
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195387261
Size: 78.58 MB
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A Social History of American Technology, Second Edition, tells the story of American technology from the tools used by its earliest inhabitants to the technological systems--cars and computers, aircraft and antibiotics--that we are familiar with today. Ruth Schwartz Cowan and Matthew H. Hersch demonstrate how technological change has always been closely related to social and economic development, and examine the important mutual relationships between social history and technological change. They explain how the unique characteristics of American cultures and American geography have affected the technologies that have been invented, manufactured, and used throughout the years--and also the reverse: how those technologies have affected the daily lives, the unique cultures, and the environments of all Americans.

Jung And The Making Of Modern Psychology

Author: Sonu Shamdasani
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521539098
Size: 69.78 MB
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Occultist, Scientist, Prophet, Charlatan - C. G. Jung has been called all these things and after decades of myth making, is one of the most misunderstood figures in Western intellectual history. This book is the first comprehensive study of the origins of his psychology, as well as providing a new account of the rise of modern psychology and psychotherapy. Based on a wealth of hitherto unknown archival materials it reconstructs the reception of Jung's work in the human sciences, and its impact on the social and intellectual history of the twentieth century. The book creates a basis for all future discussion of Jung, and opens new vistas on psychology today.

Cities And The Making Of Modern Europe 1750 1914

Author: Andrew Lees
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052183936X
Size: 65.13 MB
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A survey of urbanization and the making of modern Europe from the mid-eighteenth century to the First World War.

The Birth Of The Modern World 1780 1914

Author: C. A. Bayly
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9780631236160
Size: 23.32 MB
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This thematic history of the world from 1780 to the onset of the First World War reveals that the world was far more ‘globalised’ at this time than is commonly thought. Explores previously neglected sets of connections in world history. Reveals that the world was far more ‘globalised’, even at the beginning of this period, than is commonly thought. Sketches the ‘ripple effects’ of world crises such as the European revolutions and the American Civil War. Shows how events in Asia, Africa and South America impacted on the world as a whole. Considers the great themes of the nineteenth-century world, including the rise of the modern state, industrialisation and liberalism. Challenges and complements the regional and national approaches which have traditionally dominated history teaching and writing.

Germany After The First World War

Author: Richard Bessel
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198219385
Size: 64.45 MB
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This is a social history of Germany in the years following the First World War. Germany's defeat and the subsequent demobilization of her armies had enormous economic, social, and psychological consequences for the nation, and it is these which Richard Bessel sets out to explore. Dr Bessel examines the changes brought by the War to Germany, by the return of the soldiers to civilian life and by the demobilization of the economy. He demonstrates how the postwar transition was viewed as a moral crusade by Germans desperately concerned about challenges to traditional authority; and he assesses the ways in which the experiences and memories of the War affected the politics of the Weimar Republic. This original and scholarly book offers important insights into the sense of dislocation, both personal and national, experienced by Germany and Germans after the First World War, and the damaging legacy of the War for German democracy.