The Making Of Modern Anthrax 1875 1920

Author: James F Stark
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317318668
Size: 51.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2696
Download
Stark offers a fresh perspective on the history of infectious disease. He examines anthrax in terms of local, national and global significance, and constructs a narrative that spans public, professional and geographic domains.

The Routledge History Of Disease

Author: Mark Jackson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113485787X
Size: 66.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 187
Download
The Routledge History of Disease draws on innovative scholarship in the history of medicine to explore the challenges involved in writing about health and disease throughout the past and across the globe, presenting a varied range of case studies and perspectives on the patterns, technologies and narratives of disease that can be identified in the past and that continue to influence our present. Organized thematically, chapters examine particular forms and conceptualizations of disease, covering subjects from leprosy in medieval Europe and cancer screening practices in twentieth-century USA to the ayurvedic tradition in ancient India and the pioneering studies of mental illness that took place in nineteenth-century Paris, as well as discussing the various sources and methods that can be used to understand the social and cultural contexts of disease. The book is divided into four sections, focusing in turn on historical models of disease, shifting temporal and geographical patterns of disease, the impact of new technologies on categorizing, diagnosing and treating disease, and the different ways in which patients and practitioners, as well as novelists and playwrights, have made sense of their experiences of disease in the past. International in scope, chronologically wide-ranging and illustrated with images and maps, this comprehensive volume is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of health through the ages.

Bacteria In Britain 1880 1939

Author: Rosemary Wall
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317319176
Size: 36.83 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 1903
Download
Focusing on the years between the identification of bacteria and the production of antibiotic medicine, Wall presents a study into how bacteriology has affected both clinical practice and public knowledge.

Tracks And Traces

Author: Philip Hirsch
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
ISBN: 9089642498
Size: 77.79 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 264
Download
This volume traces the threads that tie together an understanding of Thailand as a dynamic and rapidly changing society, through an examination of the work of one major scholar of the country, Andrew Turton. Turton's anthropological studies of Thailand cover a wide spectrum from politics and economy to ritual and culture, and have been crucial in shaping evolving understandings of Thai society. In this collection, ten leading specialists on Thailand from a variety of disciplines critically consider aspects of Turton's work in relation to the changing nature of different aspects of Thai society. The book tracks the links between past and present scholarship, examines the contextuality of scholarship in its times, and sheds light on the current situation in Thailand.

Animals And The Shaping Of Modern Medicine

Author: Abigail Woods
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319643371
Size: 77.84 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5299
Download
This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license. This book breaks new ground by situating animals and their diseases at the very heart of modern medicine. In demonstrating their historical significance as subjects and shapers of medicine, it offers important insights into past animal lives, and reveals that what we think of as ‘human’ medicine was in fact deeply zoological. Each chapter analyses an important episode in which animals changed and were changed by medicine. Ranging across the animal inhabitants of Britain’s zoos, sick sheep on Scottish farms, unproductive livestock in developing countries, and the tapeworms of California and Beirut, they illuminate the multi-species dimensions of modern medicine and its rich historical connections with biology, zoology, agriculture and veterinary medicine. The modern movement for One Health – whose history is also analyzed – is therefore revealed as just the latest attempt to improve health by working across species and disciplines. This book will appeal to historians of animals, science and medicine, to those involved in the promotion and practice of One Health today.

A Brief History Of Medicine

Author: Paul Strathern
Publisher: Constable & Robinson
ISBN: 9781845291556
Size: 28.11 MB
Format: PDF
View: 3780
Download
Paul Strathern follows the development of medicine through the lives of its greatest practitioners, whose discoveries (and errors) shaped the course of medical history. Includes geniuses, such as Paracelsus, the father of medical chemistry, and Edward Jenner, whose vaccination banished smallpox, scientific endeavour, such as the discovery of X-rays, and mistakes both fortunate and fatal. With grave robbing, plague and germ theory, quackery, nursing, syphilis, micro-organisms and penicillin along the way, this is the ultimate story of human - and humane - achievement.

Basic Epidemiology

Author: R. Bonita
Publisher: World Health Organization
ISBN: 9241547073
Size: 47.18 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2281
Download
Basic epidemiology provides an introduction to the core principles and methods of epidemiology, with a special emphasis on public health applications in developing countries. This edition includes chapters on the nature and uses of epidemiology; the epidemiological approach to defining and measuring the occurrence of health-related states in populations; the strengths and limitations of epidemiological study designs; and the role of epidemiology in evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of health care. The book has a particular emphasis on modifiable environmental factors and encourages the application of epidemiology to the prevention of disease and the promotion of health, including environmental and occupational health.

Animals And Disease

Author: Lise Wilkinson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521375733
Size: 49.20 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6777
Download
Man's attempts to learn about aspects of the human body and its functions by observation and study of animals are to be found throughout history, especially at times and in cultures where the human body was considered sacrosanct, even after death. This book describes the origins and later development, especially in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, of comparative medicine and its interrelationship with medicine and veterinary medicine and the efforts of its practitioners to understand and control outbreaks of infectious, epidemic diseases in humans and in domestic animals. In the nineteenth century their efforts and increasing professionalism led to the creation of specialised institutes devoted to the study of comparative medicine. Paradoxically the first such institute, the Brown Institution, opened in London in 1871, despite the fact that the study of this branch of medicine in Britain had always lagged behind that in France and Germany. The book discusses the rise and fall of this centre and describes how it was soon overtaken in importance by the great institutes in Paris and Berlin and then, from the turn of the century, by American institutes, funded by private fortunes. This book sheds much new light on the medical and veterinary history of this period and will provide a new perspective on the history of bacteriology.

Science In The Contemporary World

Author: Eric Gottfrid Swedin
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1851095241
Size: 47.75 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7314
Download
This work is a unique introductory A–Z resource detailing the scientific achievements of the contemporary world and analyzing the key scientific trends, discoveries, and personalities of the modern age. * Over 200 A–Z entries covering topics ranging from plate tectonics to the first Moon landings * More than 40 stunning photographs providing a unique pictorial chronicle of the achievements of modern science

The Making Of A Social Disease

Author: David S. Barnes
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520915176
Size: 57.47 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5821
Download
In this first English-language study of popular and scientific responses to tuberculosis in nineteenth-century France, David Barnes provides a much-needed historical perspective on a disease that is making an alarming comeback in the United States and Europe. Barnes argues that French perceptions of the disease—ranging from the early romantic image of a consumptive woman to the later view of a scourge spread by the poor—owed more to the power structures of nineteenth-century society than to medical science. By 1900, the war against tuberculosis had become a war against the dirty habits of the working class. Lucid and original, Barnes's study broadens our understanding of how and why societies assign moral meanings to deadly diseases.