The Flatlanders

Author: John T. Davis
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292745540
Size: 57.48 MB
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A group of three friends who made music in a house in Lubbock, Texas, recorded an album that wasn't released and went their separate ways into solo careers. That group became a legend and then—twenty years later—a band. The Flatlanders—Joe Ely, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and Butch Hancock—are icons in American music, with songs blending country, folk, and rock that have influenced a long list of performers, including Robert Earl Keen, the Cowboy Junkies, Ryan Bingham, Terry Allen, John Hiatt, Hayes Carll, Lucinda Williams, Steve Earle, and Lyle Lovett. In The Flatlanders: Now It's Now Again, Austin author and music journalist John T. Davis traces the band's musical journey from the house on 14th Street in Lubbock to their 2013 sold-out concert at Carnegie Hall. He explores why music was, and is, so important in Lubbock and how earlier West Texas musicians such as Buddy Holly and Roy Orbison, as well as a touring Elvis Presley, inspired the young Ely, Gilmore, and Hancock. Davis vividly recreates the Lubbock countercultural scene that brought the Flatlanders together and recounts their first year (1972–1973) as a band, during which they recorded the songs that, decades later, were released as the albums More a Legend Than a Band and The Odessa Tapes. He follows the three musicians through their solo careers and into their first decade as a (re)united band, in which they cowrote songs for the first time on the albums Now Again and Hills and Valleys and recovered their extraordinary original demo tape, lost for forty years. Many roads later, the Flatlanders are finally both a legend and a band.

Pickers And Poets

Author: Craig E. Clifford
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 162349446X
Size: 75.85 MB
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Many books and essays have addressed the broad sweep of Texas music—its multicultural aspects, its wide array and blending of musical genres, its historical transformations, and its love/hate relationship with Nashville and other established music business centers. This book, however, focuses on an essential thread in this tapestry: the Texas singer-songwriters to whom the contributors refer as “ruthlessly poetic.” All songs require good lyrics, but for these songwriters, the poetic quality and substance of the lyrics are front and center. Obvious candidates for this category would include Townes Van Zandt, Michael Martin Murphey, Guy Clark, Steve Fromholz, Terry Allen, Kris Kristofferson, Vince Bell, and David Rodriguez. In a sense, what these songwriters were doing in small, intimate live-music venues like the Jester Lounge in Houston, the Chequered Flag in Austin, and the Rubaiyat in Dallas was similar to what Bob Dylan was doing in Greenwich Village. In the language of the times, these were “folksingers.” Unlike Dylan, however, these were folksingers writing songs about their own people and their own origins and singing in their own vernacular. This music, like most great poetry, is profoundly rooted. That rootedness, in fact, is reflected in the book’s emphasis on place and the powerful ways it shaped and continues to shape the poetry and music of Texas singer-songwriters. From the coffeehouses and folk clubs where many of the “founders” got their start to the Texas-flavored festivals and concerts that nurtured both their fame and the rise of a new generation, the indelible stamp of origins is inseparable from the work of these troubadour-poets. Contents Introduction, by Craig Clifford and Craig D. Hillis | 1 Part One. The First Generation: Folksingers, Texas Style Too Weird for Kerrville: The Darker Side of Texas Music | 17 Craig Clifford Townes Van Zandt: The Anxiety, Artifice, and Audacity of Influence | 27 Robert Earl Hardy Vignette—The Ballad of Willis Alan Ramsey | 36 Bob Livingston Guy Clark: Old School Poet of the World | 39 Tamara Saviano Kris Kristofferson: The Silver-Tongued Rhodes Scholar | 49 Peter Cooper Vignette—Don Henley: Literature, Land, and Legacy | 59 Kathryn Jones Steven Fromholz, Michael Martin Murphey, and Jerry Jeff Walker: Poetic in Lyric, Message, and Musical Method | 61 Craig D. Hillis Vignette—Kinky Friedman: The Mel Brooks of Texas Music | 83 Craig Clifford Billy Joe Shaver: Sin and Salvation Poet | 85 Joe Holley One Man’s Music: Vince Bell | 92 Joe Nick Patoski Vignette—Ray Wylie Hubbard: Grifter, Ruffian, Messenger | 101 Jenni Finlay The Great Progressive Country Scare of the 1970s | 103 Craig D. Hillis (interview with Gary P. Nunn) Plenty Else to Do: Lyrical Lubbock | 109 Andy Wilkinson Roots of Steel: The Poetic Grace of Women Texas Singer-Songwriters | 115 Kathryn Jones From Debauched Yin to Mellow Yang: A Circular Trip through the Texas Music Festival Scene | 136 Jeff Prince Vignette—Bobby Bridger: “Heal in the Wisdom,” Creating a Classic | 145 Craig D. Hillis (interview with Bobby Bridger) Interlude: What Do We Do with Willie? | 148 —I. Willie (An Early Encounter) | 148 Craig D. Hillis —II. Willie (On Everything) | 151 Craig Clifford and Craig D. Hillis Part Two. The Second Generation: Garage Bands, Large Bands, and Other Permutations “Gettin’ Tough”: Steve Earle’s America | 161 Jason Mellard Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen: Cosmic Aggies | 166 Jan Reid Vignette—Walt Wilkins: Spirituality and Generosity | 174 Craig Clifford (interview with Tim Jones) Lucinda Williams: Poet of Places in the Heart | 176 Kathryn Jones Rodney Crowell: Looking Inward, Looking Outward | 185 John T. Davis Vignette—Sam Baker: Short Stories in Song | 192 Robert Earl Hardy James McMurtry: Too Long in the Wasteland | 193 Diana Finlay Hendricks Part Three. Epilogue: Passing of the Torch? Drunken Poet’s Dream: Hayes Carll | 203 —I. Good Enough for Old Guys | 203 Craig Clifford —II. Good Enough for Young Guys | 207 Brian T. Atkinson Roll On: Terri Hendrix | 209 Brian T. Atkinson From Riding Bulls to Dead Horses: Ryan Bingham | 212 Craig Clifford (interview with Shaina Post) Bad Girl Poet: Miranda Lambert | 218 Craig Clifford Challenge to Bro Country: Kacey Musgraves | 221 Grady Smith Beyond the Rivers | 224 Craig Clifford Notes | 231 Selected Sources | 233 Contributors | 243 Index | 251

Prairie Nights To Neon Lights

Author: Joe Carr
Publisher: Texas Tech University Press
ISBN: 9780896723658
Size: 40.32 MB
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Belmont University Prize for Best Book on Country Music 1995 From the regional bands of the 1930s and 1940s to the impact of Elvis Presley on the musicians and singers of the 1950s, Prairie Nights to Neon Lights takes us inside the heart of West Texas music. Buddy Holly and Roy Orbison, Edd Mayfield and Tex Logan, the Carter Family and Bob Wills, Tommy Hancock and Jimmy Dale Gilmore, Joe Ely, and Butch Hancock—these are just a few of the legends profiled in this exciting volume.

Fire In The Water Earth In The Air

Author: Christopher J. Oglesby
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292749694
Size: 26.56 MB
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From Buddy Holly and the Crickets to the Flatlanders, Terry Allen, and Natalie Maines, Lubbock, Texas, has produced songwriters, musicians, and artists as prolifically as cotton, conservatives, and windstorms. While nobody questions where the conservatives come from in a city that a recent nonpartisan study ranked as America's second most conservative, many people wonder why Lubbock is such fertile ground for creative spirits who want to expand the boundaries of thought in music and art. Is it just that "there's nothing else to do," as some have suggested, or is there something in the character of Lubbock that encourages creativity as much as conservatism? In this book, Christopher Oglesby interviews twenty-five musicians and artists with ties to Lubbock to discover what it is about this community and West Texas in general that feeds the creative spirit. Their answers are revealing. Some speak of the need to rebel against conventional attitudes that threaten to limit their horizons. Others, such as Joe Ely, praise the freedom of mind they find on the wide open plains. "There is this empty desolation that I could fill if I picked up a pen and wrote, or picked up a guitar and played," he says. Still others express skepticism about how much Lubbock as a place contributes to the success of its musicians. Jimmie Dale Gilmore says, "I think there is a large measure of this Lubbock phenomenon that is just luck, and that is the part that you cannot explain." As a whole, the interviews create a portrait not only of Lubbock's musicians and artists, but also of the musical community that has sustained them, including venues such as the legendary Cotton Club and the original Stubb's Barbecue. This kaleidoscopic portrait of the West Texas music scene gets to the heart of what it takes to create art in an isolated, often inhospitable environment. As Oglesby says, "Necessity is the mother of creation. Lubbock needed beauty, poetry, humor, and it needed to get up and shake its communal ass a bit or go mad from loneliness and boredom; so Lubbock created the amazing likes of Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Butch Hancock, Terry Allen, and Joe Ely."

Reverb

Author: Joe Ely
Publisher: Earle R. Ely
ISBN: 9780991464845
Size: 14.54 MB
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The young seeker of Joe Ely's REVERB is the son of "pioneers who came seeking freedom who found so much of it that they couldn't handle it." He lives in Lubbock, Texas, a town that exists in "a normal state of static chaos." It is the so-called Summer of Love and 18-year-old Earle hitchhikes the road and rides the rails with only his guitar. He is on an odyssey to find himself.

The Best Of No Depression

Author: Grant Alden
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292709897
Size: 37.33 MB
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To celebrate the tenth anniversary of alternative country music magazine "No Depression," this anthology contains 25 of the magazine's best and most representative feature articles on venerated artists and songwriters of genuine American roots music.

Bonfire Of Roadmaps

Author: Joe Ely
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292782152
Size: 15.67 MB
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Since he first hitched a ride out of Lubbock, Texas, at the age of sixteen, singer-songwriter and Flatlanders band member Joe Ely has been a road warrior, traveling highways and back roads across America and Europe, playing music for "2 hours of ecstasy" out of "22 hours of misery." To stay sane on the road, Ely keeps a journal, penning verses that sometimes morph into songs, and other times remain "snapshots of what was flying by, just out of reach, so to savor at a later date when the wheels stop rolling, and the gears quit grinding, and the engines shut down." In Bonfire of Roadmaps, Ely takes readers on the road with him. Using verse passages from his road journals and his own drawings, Ely authentically re-creates the experience of a musician's life on tour, from the hard goodbyes at home, to the long hours on the road, to the exhilaration of a great live show, to the exhaustion after weeks of touring. Ely's road trips begin as he rides the rails to Manhattan in 1972 and continue up through recent concert tours with fellow Flatlanders Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Butch Hancock. While acknowledging that "it is not the nature of a gypsy to look in the rearview mirror," Joe Ely nevertheless offers his many fans a revelatory look back over the roads he's traveled and the wisdom he's won from his experiences. And for "those who want to venture beyond the horizon just to see what is there... to those, I hope these accounts will give a glint of inspiration..."

Flatlanders And Ridgerunners

Author: James York Glimm
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 9780822953456
Size: 73.51 MB
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Collects traditional legends, proverbs, tall tales, jokes, social customs, and ghost stories from the northern counties of Pennsylvania

First Person Rural

Author: Noel Perrin
Publisher: David R. Godine Publisher
ISBN: 9780879238339
Size: 53.16 MB
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Having moved from New York fifteen years before to become a Vermont farmer, Perrin recounts his mistakes in adjusting to country life and offers advice on such topics as sugaring, raising sheep, and making butter

Flatland

Author: Edwin Abbott Abbott
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 17.49 MB
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Considered both a satire and a science fiction novella, Abbott's Flatland experiments with the idea of various dimensions in time and space.