The Fever Of 1721

Author: Stephen Coss
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 147678308X
Size: 30.56 MB
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More than fifty years before the American Revolution, Boston was in revolt against the tyrannies of the Crown, Puritan Authority, and Superstition. This is the story of a fateful year that prefigured the events of 1776. In The Fever of 1721, Stephen Coss brings to life an amazing cast of characters in a year that changed the course of medical history, American journalism, and colonial revolution, including Cotton Mather, the great Puritan preacher, son of the president of Harvard College; Zabdiel Boylston, a doctor whose name is on one of Boston’s grand avenues; James and his younger brother Benjamin Franklin; and Elisha Cooke and his protégé Samuel Adams. During the worst smallpox epidemic in Boston history Mather convinced Doctor Boylston to try a procedure that he believed would prevent death—by making an incision in the arm of a healthy person and implanting it with smallpox. “Inoculation” led to vaccination, one of the most profound medical discoveries in history. Public outrage forced Boylston into hiding, and Mather’s house was firebombed. A political fever also raged. Elisha Cooke was challenging the Crown for control of the colony and finally forced Royal Governor Samuel Shute to flee Massachusetts. Samuel Adams and the Patriots would build on this to resist the British in the run-up to the American Revolution. And a bold young printer James Franklin (who was on the wrong side of the controversy on inoculation), launched America’s first independent newspaper and landed in jail. His teenage brother and apprentice, Benjamin Franklin, however, learned his trade in James’s shop and became a father of the Independence movement. One by one, the atmosphere in Boston in 1721 simmered and ultimately boiled over, leading to the full drama of the American Revolution.

The Fever Of 1721

Author: Stephen Coss
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476783128
Size: 14.88 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1807
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The “intelligent and sweeping” (Booklist) story of the crucial year that prefigured the events of the American Revolution in 1776—and how Boston’s smallpox epidemic was at the center of it all. In The Fever of 1721 Stephen Coss brings to life the amazing cast of characters who changed the course of medical history, American journalism, and colonial revolution: Cotton Mather, the great Puritan preacher, son of the President of Harvard College; Zabdiel Boylston, a doctor whose name is on one of Boston’s avenues; James Franklin and his younger brother Benjamin; and Elisha Cooke and his protégé Samuel Adams. Coss describes how, during the worst smallpox epidemic in Boston history Mather convinced Doctor Boylston to try making an incision in the arm of a healthy person and implanting it with smallpox matter. Public outrage forced Boylston into hiding and Mather’s house was firebombed. “In 1721, Boston was a dangerous place…In Coss’s telling, the troubles of 1721 represent a shift away from a colony of faith and toward the modern politics of representative government” (The New York Times Book Review). Elisha Cooke and Samuel Adams were beginning to resist the British in the run-up to the American Revolution. Meanwhile, a bold young printer names James Franklin launched America’s first independent newspaper and landed in jail. His teenaged brother and apprentice, Benjamin Franklin, however, learned his trade in James’s shop and became a father of the Independence movement. One by one, the atmosphere in Boston in 1721 simmered and ultimately boiled over, leading to the full drama of the American Revolution. “Fascinating, informational, and pleasing to read…Coss’s gem of colonial history immerses readers into eighteenth-century Boston and introduces a collection of fascinating people and intriguing circumstances” (Library Journal, starred review).

The Fever Of 1721

Author: Stephen Coss
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 147678311X
Size: 51.13 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 2293
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"More than fifty years before the American Revolution, Boston was in revolt against the tyrannies of the Crown, Puritan Authority, and Superstition. This is the story of a fateful year that prefigured the events of 1776. In The Fever of 1721, Stephen Coss brings to life an amazing cast of characters in a year that changed the course of medical history, American journalism, and colonial revolution, including Cotton Mather, the great Puritan preacher, son of the president of Harvard College; Zabdiel Boylston, a doctor whose name is on one of Boston's grand avenues; James and his younger brother Benjamin Franklin; and Elisha Cooke and his protege; Samuel Adams. During the worst smallpox epidemic in Boston history Mather convinced Doctor Boylston to try a procedure that he believed would prevent death--by making an incision in the arm of a healthy person and implanting it with smallpox. "Inoculation" led to vaccination, one of the most profound medical discoveries in history. Public outrage forced Boylston into hiding, and Mather's house was firebombed. A political fever also raged. Elisha Cooke was challenging the Crown for control of the colony and finally forced Royal Governor Samuel Shute to flee Massachusetts. Samuel Adams and the Patriots would build on this to resist the British in the run-up to the American Revolution. And a bold young printer James Franklin (who was on the wrong side of the controversy on inoculation), launched America's first independent newspaper and landed in jail. His teenage brother and apprentice, Benjamin Franklin, however, learned his trade in James's shop and became a father of the Independence movement. One by one, the atmosphere in Boston in 1721 simmered and ultimately boiled over, leading to the full drama of the American Revolution"--

Storyville

Author: Lois Battle
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101640227
Size: 48.22 MB
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From turn-of-the-century New Orleans, a city renowned for sin, seduction, and sex, comes a tale of two women inextricably linked by “the District” of Storyville, where prostitution was legal—and flourishing. Kate—young, beautiful, and abandoned by a man who doesn’t love her—finds herself thrown on the mercies of the city. Julia Randsome is a transplanted Yankee, a supporter of women’s rights, who against everyone’s advice marries into one of the city’s most prominent families. Though they occupy different universes in New Orleans, somehow all roads bring Kate and Julia to the same place…back to the District. As lush and provocative as New Orleans is itself, Storyville sweeps across lines of caste and blood, money and desire—and into the voluptuous secrets of a city as tempting as any on earth. “Lois Battle is a born storyteller.”—The Washington Post “Storyville comes to lurid life.”—Kirkus Reviews

Miraculous Plagues

Author: Cristobal Silva
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190272406
Size: 28.34 MB
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In the summer of 1629, John Winthrop described a series of epidemics that devastated Native American populations along the eastern seaboard of New England as a "miraculous plague." Winthrop was struck by the providential nature of these waves of disease, which contributed neatly to the settlers' justifications for colonial expansion. Taking Winthrop's phrase as its cornerstone, Miraculous Plagues reimagines New England's literary history by tracing seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century epidemics alongside events including early migration, the Antinomian controversy, the evolution of the halfway covenant and jeremiad, and Boston's 1721 inoculation controversy. Moving beyond familiar histories of New World epidemics (often referred to as the "virgin soil" model), Cristobal Silva identifies epidemiology as a generic category with specialized forms and conventions. Epidemiology functions as both subject and method in Silva's argument, as he details narratives that represent modes of infection, population distribution, and immunity. He considers how regional and generational patterns of illness affected the perception of communal identity, and he analyzes the translation of epidemic events into narrative and generic terms, providing scholars a new way to conceptualize the relationship between immunology and ideology. Closing with a discussion of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, Miraculous Plagues underscores the portability of its insights into the geopolitics of medicine. Just as epidemiology aided in transforming colonial America, it continues to influence questions of geography, community, and identity that are bound up in global health practices today.

Pilate S Wife

Author: Antoinette May
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061870749
Size: 29.51 MB
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A daughter of privilege in the most powerful empire the world has ever known, Claudia has a unique and disturbing "gift": her dreams have an uncanny way of coming true. As a rebellious child seated beside the tyrannical Roman Emperor Tiberius, she first spies the powerful gladiator who will ultimately be her one true passion. Yet it is the ambitious magistrate Pontius Pilate who intrigues the impressionable young woman she becomes, and Claudia finds her way into his arms by means of a mysterious ancient magic. Pilate is her grand destiny, leading her to Judaea and plunging her into a seething cauldron of open rebellion. But following her friend Miriam of Magdala's confession of her ecstatic love for a charismatic religious radical, Claudia begins to experience terrifying visions—horrific premonitions of war, injustice, untold devastation and damnation . . . and the crucifixion of a divine martyr whom she must do everything in her power to save.

The Pox And The Covenant

Author: Tony Williams
Publisher: Sourcebooks Incorporated
ISBN: 9781402260933
Size: 14.96 MB
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"Tony Williams tells a rollicking good story about the contagious crisis experienced by Colonial America. The Pox and the Covenant is a superbly nuanced and well-written account of the interactions of human disease and events." – Howard Markel, MD, PhD, George E. Wantz Distinguished Professor of the History of Medicine, the University of Michigan, author of When Germs Travel After several days of skirting the North American coast, the Seahorse reached Boston, the largest city in the colonies, with a population of roughly eleven thousand souls. With such a large number of people, Boston rivaled the cities of mother England, save only for London. Boston was moreover one of the great hubs of the Atlantic trade network. It gathered goods from the farms of the New England hinterland and from smaller cities and ports along the American coast. These commodities were shipped all over the Atlantic while other goods were imported into the city and sent elsewhere. For a virus, a better place to contaminate could hardly be found.... A skeleton crew was left on the Seahorse while the rest of the crew and officers went ashore. At least one carried an infectious disease, one that would send a city into chaos, and put to its greatest test the covenant between the Puritans and their god. – from The Pox and the Covenant Praise for Tony Williams's Hurricane of Independence: "Williams recovers the victims' speculation on the hurricane's meaning and its almost poetic commingling of the natural and moral worlds....An unusual and affecting take on the American colonies at the precipice." – Kirkus Reviews "[This] double tale of natural disaster and epochal human events makes a good reading." – Booklist

Out In The Rural

Author: Thomas J. Ward Jr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190624620
Size: 34.34 MB
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"In 1965, as part of the War on Poverty, the Office of Economic Opportunity approved a $1.3 million dollar grant to fund the development of the first two community health centers in the United States, The Tufts-Delta Health Center in Mound Bayou, Mississippi, and the Columbia Point Health Center in Boston, which pioneered a health care delivery system that now includes more than 1,200 community centers in every U.S. state, providing care to over 24 million Americans annually. The architect of these centers was Dr. H. Jack Geiger, now known as the father of community medicine, who conceived of this program in 1964 along with members of the Medical Committee on Human Rights, a group of physicians active in the civil rights movement. Drawing on his experience in South Africa, where he had apprenticed under Dr. Sidney Kark, who had developed community-based health centers in African townships, Geiger proposed a similar program for the poor in the U.S. An advocate of the "social determinants of health," Geiger created a center in Mississippi that did more than just provide clinical services, but developed innovative programs in nutrition, education, and environmental services, in an attempt to deal with the question of "What does it take to be healthy and stay healthy, not just get healthy?" Out in the Rural also deals with the opposition that the center faced, from both state officials and members of the local population, providing insights into both race and class relations in Mississippi during the final years of the civil rights era. Finally, by examining the legacy of the Tufts-Delta Health Center, Out in the Rural provides a reevaluation of the War on Poverty a half-century after its inception"--Provided by publisher.

The Untold History Of Healing

Author: Wolf D. Storl
Publisher: North Atlantic Books
ISBN: 1623170931
Size: 44.34 MB
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The Untold History of Healing takes the reader on a exciting, expansive journey of the history of medicine from the Stone Age to modern times, explaining that Western medicine has its true origins in the healing lore of Paleolithic hunters and gatherers, herding nomads, and the early sedentary farmers rather than in the academic tradition of doctors and pharmacists. This absorbing history of medicine takes the reader on a sweeping journey from the Stone Age to modern times, showing that Western medicine has its origins not only in the academic tradition of doctors and pharmacists, but in the healing lore of Paleolithic hunters and gatherers, herding nomads, and the early sedentary farmers. Anthropologist and ethnobotanist Wolf D. Storl vividly describes the many ways that ancient peoples have used the plants in their immediate environment, along with handed-down knowledge and traditions, to treat the variety of ailments they encountered in daily life.