The Education Of Little Tree

Author: Forrest Carter
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826316948
Size: 38.67 MB
Format: PDF
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The Education of Little Tree tells of a boy orphaned very young, who is adopted by his Cherokee grandmother and half-Cherokee grandfather in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee during the Great Depression. "Little Tree" as his grandparents call him is shown how to hunt and survive in the mountains, to respect nature in the Cherokee Way, taking only what is needed, leaving the rest for nature to run its course. Little Tree also learns the often callous ways of white businessmen and tax collectors, and how Granpa, in hilarious vignettes, scares them away from his illegal attempts to enter the cash economy. Granma teaches Little Tree the joys of reading and education. But when Little Tree is taken away by whites for schooling, we learn of the cruelty meted out to Indian children in an attempt to assimilate them and of Little Tree's perception of the Anglo world and how it differs from the Cherokee Way. A classic of its era, and an enduring book for all ages, The Education of Little Tree has now been redesigned for this twenty-fifth anniversary edition.

The Education Of Little Tree

Author: Forrest Carter
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826328091
Size: 20.27 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Recounts the childhood remembrances of an orphaned Native American boy living with his Cherokee grandparents in a mountain log cabin in eastern Tennessee during the 1930s.

The Outlaw Josey Wales

Author: Forrest Carter
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780843963465
Size: 39.79 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Josey Wales is out for the blood of the pro-Union Jayhawkers who raped & murdered his wife. When Wales refuses to surrender, he begins a life on the run from the law, reluctantly befriending a diverse group of whites & Indians on his quest for revenge and a new life.

Little Tree

Author: Loren Long
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0399163972
Size: 61.49 MB
Format: PDF
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In the middle of a little forest, there lives a Little Tree, who loves his life and the splendid leaves that keep him cool in the heat of long summer days. Life is perfect just the way it is. Autumn arrives, and with it the cool winds that ruffle Little Tree's leaves. One by one the other trees drop their leaves, facing the cold of winter head on. But not Little Tree - he hugs his leaves as tightly as he can. Year after year Little Tree remains unchanged, his leaves having long since turned brown and withered. What would he be without them? From #1 New York Times bestselling Loren Long, creator of the Otis series, comes a gorgeously illustrated story that challenges each of us to have the courage to let go. And to grow.

Little Tree Found

Author: Troy Schmidt
Publisher: B&H Publishing Group
ISBN: 1433679906
Size: 13.74 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A little tree finds himself pulled from his home and dying in a mysterious place, until a Father and Son purchase him and give him new life as a Christmas tree. Ages 4 to 8.

Gone To Texas

Author: Forrest Carter
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780848809546
Size: 36.84 MB
Format: PDF
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American Indians And Popular Culture Media Sports And Politics

Author: Elizabeth DeLaney Hoffman
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313379904
Size: 48.83 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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"Americans are still fascinated by the romantic notion of the "noble savage," yet know little about the real Native peoples of North America. This two-volume work seeks to remedy that by examining stereotypes and celebrating the true cultures of American Indians today"--

Places I Never Meant To Be

Author: Judy Blume
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0689820348
Size: 31.76 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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A collection of short stories accompanied by short essays on censorship by twelve authors whose works have been challenged in the past.

Hunger Of Memory

Author: Richard Rodriguez
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0553898833
Size: 12.34 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Hunger of Memory is the story of Mexican-American Richard Rodriguez, who begins his schooling in Sacramento, California, knowing just 50 words of English, and concludes his university studies in the stately quiet of the reading room of the British Museum. Here is the poignant journey of a “minority student” who pays the cost of his social assimilation and academic success with a painful alienation — from his past, his parents, his culture — and so describes the high price of “making it” in middle-class America. Provocative in its positions on affirmative action and bilingual education, Hunger of Memory is a powerful political statement, a profound study of the importance of language ... and the moving, intimate portrait of a boy struggling to become a man. From the Paperback edition.

Going Native

Author: Shari M. Huhndorf
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801454425
Size: 80.55 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1892
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Since the 1800's, many European Americans have relied on Native Americans as models for their own national, racial, and gender identities. Displays of this impulse include world's fairs, fraternal organizations, and films such as Dances with Wolves. Shari M. Huhndorf uses cultural artifacts such as these to examine the phenomenon of "going native," showing its complex relations to social crises in the broader American society—including those posed by the rise of industrial capitalism, the completion of the military conquest of Native America, and feminist and civil rights activism. Huhndorf looks at several modern cultural manifestations of the desire of European Americans to emulate Native Americans. Some are quite pervasive, as is clear from the continuing, if controversial, existence of fraternal organizations for young and old which rely upon "Indian" costumes and rituals. Another fascinating example is the process by which Arctic travelers "went Eskimo," as Huhndorf describes in her readings of Robert Flaherty's travel narrative, My Eskimo Friends, and his documentary film, Nanook of the North. Huhndorf asserts that European Americans' appropriation of Native identities is not a thing of the past, and she takes a skeptical look at the "tribes" beloved of New Age devotees. Going Native shows how even seemingly harmless images of Native Americans can articulate and reinforce a range of power relations including slavery, patriarchy, and the continued oppression of Native Americans. Huhndorf reconsiders the cultural importance and political implications of the history of the impersonation of Indian identity in light of continuing debates over race, gender, and colonialism in American culture.