Creating Continuous Flow

Author: Mike Rother
Publisher: Lean Enterprise Institute
ISBN: 0966784332
Size: 78.13 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1957
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Shingo Research and Professional Publication Award recipient This workbook explains in simple, step-by-step terms how to introduce and sustain lean flows of material and information in pacemaker cells and lines, a prerequisite for achieving a lean value stream. A sight we frequently encounter when touring plants is the relocation of processing steps from departments (process villages) to product-family work cells, but too often these "cells" produce only intermittent and erratic flow. Output gyrates from hour to hour and small piles of inventory accumulate between each operation so that few of the benefits of cellularization are actually being realized; and, if the cell is located upstream from the pacemaker process, none of the benefits may ever reach the customer. This sequel to Learning to See (which focused on plant level operations) provides simple step-by-step instructions for eliminating waste and creating continuous flow at the process level. This isn't a workbook you will read once then relegate to the bookshelf. It's an action guide for managers, engineers, and production associates that you will use to improve flow each and every day. Creating Continuous Flow takes you to the next level in work cell design where you'll achieve even greater cost and lead time savings. You'll learn: * where to focus your continuous flow efforts * how to create much more efficient work cells and lines * how to operate a pacemaker process so that a lean value stream is possible * how to sustain the gains, and keep improving Creating Continuous Flow is the next logical step after Learning to See. The value-stream mapping process defined the pacemaker process and the overall flow of products and information in the plant. The next step is to shift your focus from the plant to the process level by zeroing in on the pacemaker process, which sets the production rhythm for the plant or value stream, and apply the principles of continuous flow. Every p

The Basics Of Line Balancing And Jit Kitting

Author: Beverly Townsend
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 143988238X
Size: 47.64 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Accessible to the Lean novice and shop floor employee, The Basics of Line Balancing and JIT Kitting explores line balancing and the pre-assembly of components into a finished product in a just-in-time fashion (JIT Kitting). It explains how to use time studies, develop yamazumi charts, discover and eliminate waste, balance your line, and create new standard work content for the shop floor. The book facilitates a clear understanding of the seven deadly wastes (muda) as well as what you can do to eliminate them from your facility. Describing the purpose and use of standard work, it explains how to properly staff work cells and how to develop flex plans for fluctuations in demand using this data. The first few chapters explain how to determine takt time and how to use that information along with time studies to identify when you are not meeting customer demand. The chapters on JIT Kitting explain how there are other advantages to kitting besides eliminating waste and increasing productivity. The book explains how you can use JIT Kitting to improve quality by having the parts available and limiting the options of numerous parts to the operator. It also provides the understanding needed to ensure the right parts are installed, thereby correcting issues with the build of materials.

Lean Supplier Development

Author: Chris Harris
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9781439811269
Size: 51.39 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In the global marketplace, no business is a self-contained island. No matter how effective your internal material movement, to be a future-thinking business, you must go to the next step and develop long-term supplier partnerships built on a dedication to continuous improvement and the basic concepts of Lean implementation. Lean Supplier Development: Establishing Partnerships and True Costs Throughout the Supply Chain provides step-by-step instruction on how to build partnerships of mutual improvement and success through supplier development. Offering the same advice that they have successfully applied to corporations across the globe, award-winning consultants Chris Harris, Rick Harris, and Chuck Streeter — Provide criteria on how to choose suppliers that will make good long-term partnerships Demonstrate proven methods for employing Plan for Every Part (PFEP) to link your facility to the supply base Present a true cost model that eliminates guesswork when choosing suppliers to develop Show how to develop and maintain efficient information flow all along your supply chain Use real-world examples to cover likely contingencies Provide a sample quarterly supplier review that you can adapt for your own use Lean is a journey, not a destination. It requires flexible leaders at the helm who can readily adjust to ever-changing conditions and it requires like-minded partners all along the supply chain. Finding and developing these partners is not about good fortune, it is all about an uncompromising approach to continuous improvement and the application of systematic methods that will build working partnerships that broaden your definition of what is possible

Making Materials Flow

Author: Rick Harris
Publisher: Lean Enterprise Institute
ISBN: 0974182494
Size: 70.43 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Lean Production For The Small Company

Author: Mike Elbert
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1439877793
Size: 37.28 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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A hands-on guide to adapting Lean principles and the Toyota Production System to high-mix/low-volume environments, Lean Production for the Small Company uses charts, pictures, and easy-to-understand language to describe the methods needed to improve processes and eliminate waste. It walks readers through the correct order of implementation and describes problems and pitfalls along with time-tested solutions. Explaining how to incorporate existing systems into a Lean strategy, the book starts with the fundamentals and builds on them to describe the full range of tools and processes needed to implement Lean. It outlines how to design factories for Lean manufacturing and demonstrates how to remove variations within business and manufacturing processes to achieve a smooth continuous flow of product that delivers your product on time to customers. The tools, methods, and ideals discussed are applicable in any industry and all parts of your business—from manufacturing and sales to human resources. The text unveils new methods and tools that can help you reduce inventory, improve inventory turns, and facilitate raw material flow through the factory. It details how to use customer order demands to schedule the production floor, rather than using estimated production schedules. It also considers the accounting process and explains how to improve your cash-to-cash cycle time. Drawing on the author’s decades of experience transforming high-mix plants to Lean, the text brings together coverage of the tools and processes that have made Toyota so successful. All the chapters in this book, when implemented, will result in a culture change that will transform your company into a learning organization that continuously eliminates waste and improves its processes.

Liquid Lean

Author: Raymond C. Floyd
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1439888485
Size: 25.54 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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While Lean practices have been successfully implemented into the process industry with excellent results for over 20 years (including the author’s own award winning example at Exxon Chemical), that industry has been especially slow in adopting Lean. Part of the problem is that the process industry needs its own version of Lean. The larger part of the problem is resistance to transformational change, a barrier that can only be overcome with effective leadership and results-oriented planning that engages rather than excludes all stakeholders. Winner of a 2012 Shingo Prize! Written by Raymond Floyd, an unparalleled leader of Lean transformations, Liquid Lean: Developing Lean Culture in the Process Industries provides potential process industry change agents with the no-nonsense guide needed to eliminate waste and achieve sustainable optimal efficiency. Presenting lessons in lean as they apply within the liquid industries, the book focuses on developing the four measures of Lean as defined by the Shingo Award: Business Results Consistent Lean Enterprise Culture Continuous Process Improvement Cultural Enablers Illustrated with his own success stories, Floyd describes business results, Lean enterprise thinking, and policy deployment in process industry terms. He offers detailed theory, practice, and examples of continuous process improvement, and describes the leadership and defines the ethics needed to evolve and sustain Lean transformation. Floyd lays out the specific steps needed during the first six months of transformation and the benchmarks to be achieved during the first two years of implementation. All companies can benefit from Lean; this book makes sure that those who want it, know how.

Creating Level Pull

Author: Art Smalley
Publisher: Lean Enterprise Institute
ISBN: 0974322504
Size: 45.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Creating Level Pull workbook shows you how to advance a lean transformation from a focus on isolated improvements to improving the entire plantwide production system by implementing a lean production control system. "The workbook is unique because it is a step-by-step case study on how to implement a level, pull-based production control system," said author Art Smalley. This is a new step towards 'system kaizen that is not yet well understood outside of Toyota.The lean efforts at most companies focus on "point kaizen" (e.g., reducing set up times, implementing 5S, etc.) that improves a small portion of the value stream running from raw materials to finished products. Or they focus on "flow kaizen" that improves the entire value stream for one product family. Creating Level Pull shows how companies can make the leap to "system kaizen" by introducing a lean production control system that ties together the flows of information and materials supporting every product family in a facility. With this system in place, each production activity requests precisely the materials it needs from the previous activity and demand from the customer is levelled to smooth production activities throughout the plant.[Source : 4e de couv.].

Lean Connections

Author: Chris Harris
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 142009274X
Size: 24.75 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Dependable information flow is a necessary prerequisite to the successful implementation of lean production principles. But while most managers understand how to make materials and manpower flow, the flow of information tends to be much more underdeveloped. Even companies that excel at recognizing waste and are otherwise adept at implementing the principles of lean production are often challenged to provide satisfactory information flow. Lean Connections: Making Information Flow Efficiently and Effectively isdesigned to help you rethink the way your organization views information flow. It provides the building blocks of a comprehensive information-flow system, showing you calculations and methods that will allow you to get the necessary information to those individuals who need it, when they need it. Following a logical and detailed progression, this manual shows how to make information flow in lean production facility— From the end customer through materials control to the production floor On the production floor at the operator, team, and value stream level And then from the production floor to the management of the facility Employing a workbook format, this manual follows RNA Manufacturing, a fictional company, through its implementation of a comprehensive lean production system. As the authors outline RNA’s methods and thought processes, they employ exercises that ask questions about your own production system. Your challenge is to think deeply about the answers, as well as the changes that need to be made to effectively make information flow through your facility. Make certain that everyone gets the information that they need when they need it

Lean For The Process Industries

Author: Peter L. King
Publisher: Productivity Press
ISBN:
Size: 70.93 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Most available material on Lean describes applications only in the assembly industries: automotive, machinery, computers, appliances, and the like. This book describes the application of Lean Manufacturing concepts to the process industries: sheet goods, fibers, architectural and automotive paints, food, beverage, plastics, synthetic rubber, batch chemicals, fertilizers, and pharmaceuticals. The book begins by describing characteristics which differentiate the process industries from assembly manufacturing, particularly those which influence how Lean must be applied for greatest benefit. Factors affecting dynamic flow behavior through each of the two are described, as well as a hypothetical process industry example, which is used throughout the book to illustrate application of specific lean tools.

Creating Continuous Flow

Author: Mike Rother
Publisher: Lean Enterprise Institute
ISBN: 0966784332
Size: 71.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5730
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Shingo Research and Professional Publication Award recipient This workbook explains in simple, step-by-step terms how to introduce and sustain lean flows of material and information in pacemaker cells and lines, a prerequisite for achieving a lean value stream. A sight we frequently encounter when touring plants is the relocation of processing steps from departments (process villages) to product-family work cells, but too often these "cells" produce only intermittent and erratic flow. Output gyrates from hour to hour and small piles of inventory accumulate between each operation so that few of the benefits of cellularization are actually being realized; and, if the cell is located upstream from the pacemaker process, none of the benefits may ever reach the customer. This sequel to Learning to See (which focused on plant level operations) provides simple step-by-step instructions for eliminating waste and creating continuous flow at the process level. This isn't a workbook you will read once then relegate to the bookshelf. It's an action guide for managers, engineers, and production associates that you will use to improve flow each and every day. Creating Continuous Flow takes you to the next level in work cell design where you'll achieve even greater cost and lead time savings. You'll learn: * where to focus your continuous flow efforts * how to create much more efficient work cells and lines * how to operate a pacemaker process so that a lean value stream is possible * how to sustain the gains, and keep improving Creating Continuous Flow is the next logical step after Learning to See. The value-stream mapping process defined the pacemaker process and the overall flow of products and information in the plant. The next step is to shift your focus from the plant to the process level by zeroing in on the pacemaker process, which sets the production rhythm for the plant or value stream, and apply the principles of continuous flow. Every p