The Atlantic Connection

Author: Anna Suranyi
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317500652
Size: 32.32 MB
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Focusing on the interconnections of the Atlantic world from 1450-1900, The Atlantic Connection examines the major themes of Atlantic history. During this period, ships, goods, diseases, human beings and ideas flowed across the ocean, tying together the Atlantic basin in a complex web of relationships. Divided into five main thematic sections while maintaining a broadly chronological structure, this book considers key cultural themes such as gender, social developments, the economy, and ideologies as well as: - the role of the Atlantic in ensuring European dominance - the creation of a set of societies with new cultural norms and philosophical ideals that continued to evolve and to transform not only the Atlantic, but the rest of the world - the contestation over rights and justice that emerged from the Atlantic world which continues to exist as a significant issue today. The Atlantic Connection is shaped by its exploration of a key question: how did Europe come to dominate the Atlantic if not through its technological prowess? Adeptly weaving a multitude of events into a larger analytical narrative, this book provides a fascinating insight into this complex region and will be essential reading for students of Atlantic history.

Oceanic Histories

Author: David Armitage
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108423183
Size: 57.69 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Oceanic Histories is the first comprehensive account of world history focused not on the land but viewed through the 70% of the Earth's surface covered by water. Leading historians trace the history of the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans and seas, from the Arctic and the Baltic to the South China Sea and the Sea of Japan/Korea's East Sea, over the longue dure. Individual chapters trace the histories and the historiographies of the various oceanic regions, with special attention given to the histories of circulation and particularity, the links between human and non-human history and the connections and comparisons between parts of the World Ocean. Showcasing oceanic history as a field with a long past and a vibrant future, these authoritative surveys, original arguments and guides to research make this volume an indispensable resource for students and scholars alike.

A Global History Of The Developing World

Author: Christopher M. White
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134627858
Size: 72.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A Global History of the Developing World takes a sweeping look at the historical foundations of the problems of developing world society. Encompassing Asia, Latin America and Africa, the book centralizes the struggle for self-determination in an attempt to understand how the current nation-states have been formed and what their future may hold. Although concentrating on the modern era, its scope is broad: it covers geography, ancient and modern history, economics, politics and recent events. The book features twelve chapters, organized into 4 thematic units, each containing one chapter on each of the three continents. These units cover different commonly-experienced phenomena among the peoples of the Developing World: imperialism, nationalism, globalization, and development. The first three are chronological, while the last surveys and analyzes the scholarly debates over the causes of development and underdevelopment. Through these chapters Christopher M. White presents a wide-ranging study of the major themes in studies of the developing world, including slavery, imperialism, religion, free and fair trade, democratization and economic development. Including detailed profiles of key figures as well as maps and illustrations, A Global History of the Developing World vividly illustrates the culture, personalities and histories of a key subject area. A perfect introduction for all students interested in the developing world in a historical context.

The Atlantic World

Author: Thomas Benjamin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521850991
Size: 34.30 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2006
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A comprehensive history of the interactions and exchanges between Europe, Africa, and the Americas between 1400 and 1900.

Encounters In The New World

Author: Associate Professor of History and American Studies Jill Lepore
Publisher: Turtleback
ISBN: 9780613573566
Size: 69.89 MB
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Jill Lepore, winner of the distinguished Bancroft Prize for history, brings to life in exciting, first-person detail some of the earliest events in American history. Pages From History.

The Atlantic World 1450 2000

Author: Toyin Falola
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253219434
Size: 55.58 MB
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A comprehensive survey of the Atlantic region from the 15th century to the present

From Africa To Brazil

Author: Walter Hawthorne
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139788760
Size: 63.99 MB
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From Africa to Brazil traces the flows of enslaved Africans from the broad region of Africa called Upper Guinea to Amazonia, Brazil. These two regions, though separated by an ocean, were made one by a slave route. Walter Hawthorne considers why planters in Amazonia wanted African slaves, why and how those sent to Amazonia were enslaved, and what their Middle Passage experience was like. The book is also concerned with how Africans in diaspora shaped labor regimes, determined the nature of their family lives, and crafted religious beliefs that were similar to those they had known before enslavement. It presents the only book-length examination of African slavery in Amazonia and identifies with precision the locations in Africa from where members of a large diaspora in the Americas hailed. From Africa to Brazil also proposes new directions for scholarship focused on how immigrant groups created new or recreated old cultures.

The Genius Of The English Nation

Author: Anna Suranyi
Publisher: Associated University Presse
ISBN: 9780874139983
Size: 27.39 MB
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Travel literature was one of the most popular literary genres of the early modern era. This book examines how emerging concepts of national identity, imperialism, colonialism, and orientalism were worked out and represented for English readers in early travel and ethnographic writings. Using insights from a variety of scholarly fields such as history, anthropology, and literary studies, Dr. Suranyi analyzes recurrent cultural stereotypes used by English travelers to describe continental Europe, Ireland, and the Ottoman Empire. For such writers, the most important criteria for evaluating countries were civility and barbarism. These were represented through depictions of cultural traits such as foodways, cleanliness, the roles of women, or even the ascription of gender to countries.

Imperial Portugal In The Age Of Atlantic Revolutions

Author: Gabriel Paquette
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107328594
Size: 66.87 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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As the British, French and Spanish Atlantic empires were torn apart in the Age of Revolutions, Portugal steadily pursued reforms to tie its American, African and European territories more closely together. Eventually, after a period of revival and prosperity, the Luso-Brazilian world also succumbed to revolution, which ultimately resulted in Brazil's independence from Portugal. The first of its kind in the English language to examine the Portuguese Atlantic World in the period from 1750 to 1850, this book reveals that despite formal separation, the links and relationships that survived the demise of empire entwined the historical trajectories of Portugal and Brazil even more tightly than before. From constitutionalism to economic policy to the problem of slavery, Portuguese and Brazilian statesmen and political writers laboured under the long shadow of empire as they sought to begin anew and forge stable post-imperial orders on both sides of the Atlantic.