The Art Of War In The Network Age

Author: Joseph Henrotin
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119361346
Size: 64.77 MB
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Previous studies have looked at the contribution of information technology and network theory to the art of warfare as understood in the broader sense. This book, however, focuses on an area particularly important in understanding the significance of the information revolution; its impact on strategic theory. The purpose of the book is to critically analyze the contributions and challenges that the spread of information technologies can bring to categories of classic strategic theory. In the first two chapters, the author establishes the context of the book, coming back to the epistemology of revolution in military affairs and its terminology. The third chapter examines the political bases of strategic action and operational strategy, before the next two chapters focus on historical construction of the process of getting to know your opponents and the way in which we consider information collection. Chapter 6 returns to the process of “informationalization” in the doctrine of armed forces, especially in Western countries, and methods of conducting network-centric warfare. The final chapter looks at the attempts of Western countries to adapt to the emergence of techno-guerrillas and new forms of hybrid warfare, and the resulting socio-strategic outcomes.

The Art Of War In An Asymmetric World

Author: Barry Scott Zellen
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1441154310
Size: 31.17 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The work examines the rise of the movements against globalization, modernization, and Western dominance that followed the collapse of the bipolar world and the end of the Cold War and that culminated with today's global jihadist movements. It describes how the U.S. had to adapt to this new, asymmetrical world of conflict with its strategic, doctrinal and theoretical responses to the threats of terrorism and insurgency that defined the Global War on Terror (GWOT). Unique in the breadth of its scope, the book connects movements from the Zapatista uprising to Al Qaeda's global jihad within a broader historical framework, connecting pre and post-9/11 conflicts under the unifying theme of a struggle against the forces of modernization. Featuring the works of key theorists such as John Arquilla, Thomas P.M. Barnett, Arthur K. Cebrowski, Jim Gant, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert D. Kaplan, David J. Kilcullen, William H. McRaven, and David Ronfeldt, this book bridges the fields of counterinsurgency, homeland security, counterterrorism, cyberwarfare, and technology of war, and will be a must-read for academics, policymakers and strategists.

The Age Of Lincoln And The Art Of American Power 1848 1876

Author: William Nester
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1612346596
Size: 31.40 MB
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Although Abraham Lincoln was among seven presidents who served during the tumultuous years between the end of the Mexican War and the end of the Reconstruction era, history has not been kind to the others: Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, and Ulysses S. Grant. In contrast, history sees Abraham Lincoln as a giant in character and deeds. During his presidency, he governed brilliantly, developed the economy, liberated four million people from slavery, reunified the nation, and helped enact the Homestead Act, among other accomplishments. He proved to be not only an outstanding commander in chief but also a skilled diplomat, economist, humanist, educator, and moralist. Lincoln achieved that and more because he was a master of the art of American power. He understood that the struggle for hearts and minds was the essence of politics in a democracy. He asserted power mostly by appealing to peopleÆs hopes rather than their fears. All along he tried to shape rather than reflect prevailing public opinions that differed from his own. To that end, he was brilliant at bridging the gap between progressives and conservatives by reining in the former and urging on the latter. His art of power ultimately reflected his unswerving devotion to the Declaration of IndependenceÆs principles and the ConstitutionÆs institutions, or as he so elegantly expressed it, ôto a government of the people, by the people, and for the people.ö

The Art And Politics Of Film

Author: John Orr
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780748611997
Size: 46.13 MB
Format: PDF
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The people who shaped America's public broadcasting system thought it should be "a civilized voice in a civilized community" -- a clear alternative to commercial broadcasting. This book tells the story of how NPR has tried to embody this idea. Michael P. McCauley describes NPR's evolution from virtual obscurity in the early 1970s, when it was riddled with difficulties -- political battles, unseasoned leadership, funding problems -- to a first-rate broadcast organization. The book draws on a wealth of primary evidence, including fifty-seven interviews with people who have been central to the NPR story, and it places the network within the historical context of the wider U.S. radio industry. Since the late 1970s, NPR has worked hard to understand the characteristics of its audience. Because of this, its content is now targeted toward its most loyal listeners -- highly educated baby-boomers, for the most part -- who help support their local stations through pledges and fund drives.

The Sage Of Aquarius

Author: Patrick Valentine
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1465333118
Size: 30.73 MB
Format: PDF
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The Sage of Aquarius This tale begins tomorrow. The over-populated and ravaged earth is gasping for breaths while corporations and criminals dominate the earths scant resources and its troubled humans. When a quirky prodigy builds a computer that communicates with the metaphysical realm he inadvertently sets a chain of corrective measures into motion. An improbable family of diverse renegades forms for a globe-wide race to escape a power-mad lunatic and their own dark pasts. Our survivors, guided by the planets, discover that love really does heal the past. Mother Nature, however, has her own agenda.

The Underside Of Politics

Author: Sorin Radu Cucu
Publisher: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 0823254348
Size: 43.28 MB
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This book explores the relation between nationhood, literary culture and globalism in the context of the Cold War struggle over the legacy of European modernity, a struggle to represent diverse experiences of the political, after World War II and colonialism. This book argues that, during the Cold War, modern political imagination is held captive by the split between two visions of universality -- freedom in the West vs. social justice in the East -- and by a culture of secrecy that ties national identity to national security. The significance of Cold War political modernity is made evident in the staging of dialogues between post-1945 American and Eastern European novelists: Kundera with Roth, Coover with Popescu and Kis and DeLillo.

Yellow Smoke

Author: Robert H. Scales
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Incorporated
ISBN:
Size: 75.36 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This timely book draws upon a long and distinguished military career and wars dating back to Korea for lessons for America's future land wars. Scales looks at Afghanistan and Iraq, and ahead to a wargame scenario of Kosovo 2020 to develop a picture of the American style of war. Visit our website for sample chapters!