Taste

Author: Barb Stuckey
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439190747
Size: 66.67 MB
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"Foodies rejoice! Malcolm Gladwell's favorite food inventor offers a guide to the senses with advice on how to develop your palate and better enjoy the pleasures of eating. Featured by Malcolm Gladwell in a New Yorker magazine article about the quest to develop the perfect cookie, Barb Stuckey is the food developer that famed foodies--such as Michael Pollan--turn to when they need to understand the psychology and physiology of taste. In Taste What You're Missing, Stuckey shares her professional knowledge in an engaging style that's one part Mary Roach, two parts Oliver Sacks, and a dash of Anthony Bourdain for spice. Taste What You're Missing serves up stories: seared, sauced, and garnished with humor and insight into our complicated experiences with food. First explaining the building blocks of taste perception on a physical level, Stuckey walks readers through the five basic tastes: sweet, sour, bitter, salt, and umami. She explains the critical importance of smell and how the other senses--touch, hearing, and sight--come into play when we enthusiastically dive into a plate of food. She provides eye-opening and delicious anecdotes and exercises that readers can perform to learn, for example, their unique "taster type," or the subtle differences between sour, bitter, tannic, and astringent. Armed with this new knowledge, readers can improve their ability to discern flavors, detect ingredients, and devise new taste combinations in their own kitchens. Keeping in mind that the only thing foodies like better than eating food is talking about food, Taste What You're Missing gives such curious eaters, Food Network watchers, kitchen tinkerers, and armchair Top Chefs understanding and language that will impress their friends and families with insider knowledge about everything they eat"--

Taste What You Re Missing

Author: Barb Stuckey
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439190739
Size: 67.22 MB
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A professional food developer featured by Malcolm Gladwell in a New Yorker "perfect cookie" article offers insight into the psychology and physiology of taste while providing engaging anecdotes and cooking exercises for enhancing the flavor experience. 40,000 first printing.

A Taste Of Molecules

Author: Diane Fresquez
Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY
ISBN: 1558618392
Size: 39.46 MB
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A spirited food writer on the trail of obsessive scientists and entrepreneurs who want to titillate our taste buds.

Tasty

Author: John McQuaid
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451685009
Size: 15.67 MB
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Draws on reports from kitchens, markets, farms, and laboratories to trace historical experiences of flavor while making predictions on how the sense of taste will evolve in coming decades.

Taste Matters

Author: John Prescott
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 1861899513
Size: 39.13 MB
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The human tongue has somewhere up to eight thousand taste buds to inform us when something is sweet, salty, sour, or bitter—or as we usually think of it—delicious or revolting. Tastes differ from one region to the next, and no two people’s seem to be the same. But why is it that some people think maple syrup is too sweet, while others can’t get enough? What makes certain people love Roquefort cheese and others think it smells like feet? Why do some people think cilantro tastes like soap? John Prescott tackles this conundrum in Taste Matters, an absorbing exploration of why we eat and seek out the foods that we do. Prescott surveys the many factors that affect taste, including genetic inheritance, maternal diet, cultural traditions, and physiological influences. He also delves into what happens when we eat for pleasure instead of nutrition, paying particularly attention to affluent Western societies, where, he argues, people increasingly view food selection as a sensory or intellectual pleasure rather than a means of survival. As obesity and high blood pressure are on the rise along with a number of other health issues, changes in the modern diet are very much to blame, and Prescott seeks to answer the question of why and how our tastes often lead us to eat foods that are not the best for our health. Compelling and accessible, this timely book paves the way for a healthier and more sustainable understanding of taste.

Neurogastronomy

Author: Gordon Shepherd
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231159110
Size: 56.14 MB
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Challenging the belief that the sense of smell diminished during human evolution, Shepherd argues that this sense, which constitutes the main component of flavor, is far more powerful and essential than previously believed. --from publisher description

Making Sense Of Taste

Author: Carolyn Korsmeyer
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 080147132X
Size: 63.94 MB
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Taste, perhaps the most intimate of the five senses, has traditionally been considered beneath the concern of philosophy, too bound to the body, too personal and idiosyncratic. Yet, in addition to providing physical pleasure, eating and drinking bear symbolic and aesthetic value in human experience, and they continually inspire writers and artists. In Making Sense of Taste, Carolyn Korsmeyer explains how taste came to occupy so low a place in the hierarchy of senses and why it is deserving of greater philosophical respect and attention. Korsmeyer begins with the Greek thinkers who classified taste as an inferior, bodily sense; she then traces the parallels between notions of aesthetic and gustatory taste that were explored in the formation of modern aesthetic theories. She presents scientific views of how taste actually works and identifies multiple components of taste experiences. Turning to taste's objects—food and drink—she looks at the different meanings they convey in art and literature as well as in ordinary human life and proposes an approach to the aesthetic value of taste that recognizes the representational and expressive roles of food. Korsmeyer's consideration of art encompasses works that employ food in contexts sacred and profane, that seek to whet the appetite and to keep it at bay; her selection of literary vignettes ranges from narratives of macabre devouring to stories of communities forged by shared eating.

The Dorito Effect

Author: Mark Schatzker
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501116134
Size: 61.51 MB
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A lively and important argument from an award-winning journalist proving that the key to reversing North America’s health crisis lies in the overlooked link between nutrition and flavor. In The Dorito Effect, Mark Schatzker shows us how our approach to the nation’s number one public health crisis has gotten it wrong. The epidemics of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes are not tied to the overabundance of fat or carbs or any other specific nutrient. Instead, we have been led astray by the growing divide between flavor—the tastes we crave—and the underlying nutrition. Since the late 1940s, we have been slowly leeching flavor out of the food we grow. Those perfectly round, red tomatoes that grace our supermarket aisles today are mostly water, and the big breasted chickens on our dinner plates grow three times faster than they used to, leaving them dry and tasteless. Simultaneously, we have taken great leaps forward in technology, allowing us to produce in the lab the very flavors that are being lost on the farm. Thanks to this largely invisible epidemic, seemingly healthy food is becoming more like junk food: highly craveable but nutritionally empty. We have unknowingly interfered with an ancient chemical language—flavor—that evolved to guide our nutrition, not destroy it. With in-depth historical and scientific research, The Dorito Effect casts the food crisis in a fascinating new light, weaving an enthralling tale of how we got to this point and where we are headed. We’ve been telling ourselves that our addiction to flavor is the problem, but it is actually the solution. We are on the cusp of a new revolution in agriculture that will allow us to eat healthier and live longer by enjoying flavor the way nature intended.

Pandora S Lunchbox

Author: Melanie Warner
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 145166673X
Size: 13.45 MB
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A former New York Times food industry staff reporter traces her investigative journey into national research labs, food science departments and factories to reveal disturbing facts about today's processed foods and their health implications, in a report that also shares cautionary realities about health foods.

Molecular Gastronomy

Author: Hervé This
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231133128
Size: 77.79 MB
Format: PDF
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Bringing the instruments and experimental techniques of the laboratory into the kitchen, Herve This uses recent research in the chemistry, physics, and biology of food to challenge traditional ideas about cooking and eating. What he discovers will entertain, instruct, and intrigue cooks, gourmets, and scientists alike. Molecular Gastronomy, This's first work to appear in English, is filled with practical tips, provocative suggestions, and penetrating insights. This begins by reexamining and debunking a variety of time-honored rules and dictums about cooking and presents new and improved ways of preparing a variety of dishes from quiches and quenelles to steak and hard-boiled eggs. He goes on to discuss the physiology of flavor and explores how the brain perceives tastes, how chewing affects food, and how the tongue reacts to various stimuli. Examining the molecular properties of bread, ham, foie gras, and champagne, the book analyzes what happens as they are baked, cured, cooked, and chilled.