Sugar Slavery And Freedom In Nineteenth Century Puerto Rico

Author: Luis A. Figueroa
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807876831
Size: 31.90 MB
Format: PDF
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The contributions of the black population to the history and economic development of Puerto Rico have long been distorted and underplayed, Luis A. Figueroa contends. Focusing on the southeastern coastal region of Guayama, one of Puerto Rico's three leading centers of sugarcane agriculture, Figueroa examines the transition from slavery and slave labor to freedom and free labor after the 1873 abolition of slavery in colonial Puerto Rico. He corrects misconceptions about how ex-slaves went about building their lives and livelihoods after emancipation and debunks standing myths about race relations in Puerto Rico. Historians have assumed that after emancipation in Puerto Rico, as in other parts of the Caribbean and the U.S. South, former slaves acquired some land of their own and became subsistence farmers. Figueroa finds that in Puerto Rico, however, this was not an option because both capital and land available for sale to the Afro-Puerto Rican population were scarce. Paying particular attention to class, gender, and race, his account of how these libertos joined the labor market profoundly revises our understanding of the emancipation process and the evolution of the working class in Puerto Rico.

Sugar Slavery And Freedom In Nineteenth Century Puerto Rico

Author: Luis Antonio Figueroa
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807829493
Size: 15.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The contributions of the black population to the history and economic development of Puerto Rico have long been distorted and underplayed, Luis A. Figueroa contends. Focusing on the southeastern coastal region of Guayama, one of Puerto Rico's three leading centers of sugarcane agriculture, Figueroa examines the transition from slavery and slave labor to freedom and free labor after the 1873 abolition of slavery in colonial Puerto Rico. He corrects misconceptions about how ex-slaves went about building their lives and livelihoods after emancipation and debunks standing myths about race relations in Puerto Rico. Historians have assumed that after emancipation in Puerto Rico, as in other parts of the Caribbean and the U.S. South, former slaves acquired some land of their own and became subsistence farmers. Figueroa finds that in Puerto Rico, however, this was not an option because both capital and land available for sale to the Afro-Puerto Rican population were scarce. Paying particular attention to class, gender, and race, his account of how these libertos joined the labor market profoundly revises our understanding of the emancipation process and the evolution of the working class in Puerto Rico.

Not Of Pure Blood

Author: Jay Kinsbruner
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822318422
Size: 21.57 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Based on examination of housing patterns in San Juan and demographic data from four of its 19th-century barrios, work provides a much-needed exploration of racial prejudice in Puerto Rico. Challenges commonplace denial of racial discrimination up to thep

Imposing Decency

Author: Eileen Findlay
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822323969
Size: 21.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The interrelationship between sexuality and national identity during Puerto Rico’s transition from Spanish to U.S. colonialism.

The Slave S Rebellion

Author: Adélékè Adéèkó
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253111425
Size: 72.46 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Episodes of slave rebellions such as Nat Turner's are central to speculations on the trajectory of black history and the goal of black spiritual struggles. Using fiction, history, and oral poetry drawn from the United States, the Caribbean, and Africa, this book analyzes how writers reinterpret episodes of historical slave rebellion to conceptualize their understanding of an ideal "master-less" future. The texts range from Frederick Douglass's The Heroic Slave and Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of this World to Yoruba praise poetry and novels by Nigerian writers Adebayo Faleti and Akinwumi Isola. Each text reflects different "national" attitudes toward the historicity of slave rebellions that shape the ways the texts are read. This is an absorbing book about the grip of slavery and rebellion on modern black thought.

Worker In The Cane

Author: Sidney Wilfred Mintz
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393007312
Size: 16.66 MB
Format: PDF
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This is the absorbing story of Don Taso, a Puerto Rican sugar cane worker, and of his family and the village in which he lives. Told largely in his own words, it is a vivid account of the drastic changes taking place in Puerto Rico, as he sees them.Worker In The Cane is both a profound social document and a moving spiritual testimony. Don Taso portrays his harsh childhood, his courtship and early marriage, his grim struggle to provide for his family. He tells of his radical political beliefs and union activity during the Depression and describes his hardships when he was blacklisted because of his outspoken convictions. Embittered by his continuing poverty and by a serious illness, he undergoes a dramatic cure and becomes converted to a Protestant revivalist sect. In the concluding chapters the author interprets Don Taso's experience in the light of the rapidly changing patterns of life in rural Puerto Rico.

Emotional Bridges To Puerto Rico

Author: Elizabeth M. Aranda
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742543256
Size: 61.19 MB
Format: PDF
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Emotional Bridges to Puerto Rico is about Puerto Ricans' struggles of incorporation into U.S. society, and the conditions under which members of the Puerto Rican middle-class move back and forth between the mainland and island. The book illustrates how structures of inequalities based on race, class, and gender affect Puerto Ricans' subjective assessments of incorporation. Issues regarding the racialization of Puerto Ricans in the U.S. reveal that in spite of structural incorporation, Puerto Ricans do not feel like they fully belong in mainland society. These experiences carry implications for future migration and settlement decisions.

Our Landless Patria

Author: Rosa E. Carrasquillo
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803215371
Size: 24.62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In particular, marginal citizenship adopted patriarchy as a model to regulate social relations at home, failing to address gender inequalities and perpetuating class differences."--BOOK JACKET.