Docudrama Performs The Past

Author: Steven N. Lipkin
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443827878
Size: 24.13 MB
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Docudramas, films and movies-of-the-week based on true stories, offer their audiences performance as persuasion. As docudramas re-create actual people and events, these works perform their material. The premises of docudramas’ persuasive arguments operate within the basic settings that stage performances of noteworthy events, the events of war, and the lives of noteworthy individuals. In performing the past, docudramas offer us a performance of memory. Through docudramatic performance, the memories of others become ours. The performance of memory roots docudramatic representation in actuality, and indicates the responsibility to serve the past that helps make docudrama a distinctive mode of representation. The spirit of obligation to the past also frames the ethical considerations docudrama raises, as performance in docudrama shapes public memory. Docudrama Performs the Past examines the spectrum of arguments docudramas offer as their re-creations reason from the arenas of events such as the hijacking of United Airlines Flight 93, wars ranging from World War II to Iraq, and the lives of actors, athletes, and politicians. The case studies developed in each chapter show how docudrama’s re-creation of “true stories,” its performance of memory, warrants the claims it forwards about how to remember the past. The aggregate of examining works made since the late 1990s allows us to see how, as recurring contexts, the arenas of docudramatic argument ground action and identity in the settings that frame performance, structure the moral value of the contestation that ensues, and shape the public memory of the past that docudramas perform.

Reading And Writing For Civic Literacy

Author: Donald Lazere
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351552279
Size: 52.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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'Lazere's [book] is heaven-sent and will provide a crucial link in the chain of understanding how conflicts are structured and, most importantly, how they can be rationally addressed - a healthy antidote to the scepticism that has become so pervasive in academic life.' Alan Hausman, Hunter College This innovative book addresses the need for college students to develop critical reading, writing, and thinking skills for self-defence in the contentious arena of American civic rhetoric. In a groundbreaking reconception of composition theory, it presents a comprehensive critical perspective on American public discourse and practical methods for its analysis. Exercises following the text sections and readings help students understand the ideological positions and rhetorical patterns that underlie opposing viewpoints in current controversies - such as the growing inequality of wealth in America and its impact on the finances of college students - as expressed in paired sets of readings from the political left and right. Widely debated issues of whether objectivity is possible and whether there is a liberal or conservative bias in news and entertainment media, as well as in education itself, are foregrounded as topics for rhetorical analysis.

First Principles

Author: Scott Douglas Gerber
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081473099X
Size: 46.80 MB
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"...An excellent and balanced review of the justice's first years on the Court." (National Review) The paperback edition includes a provocative new Afterword by the author bringing the book up to date by assessing Justice Thomas's performance, and the reaction to his decisions, during the last five years.

Diversity In The Power Elite

Author: Richard L. Zweigenhaft
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 0742577228
Size: 11.20 MB
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This book looks systematically at the extent to which Jews, women, African Americans, Latinos, Asians and gay men and lesbians have entered the higher circles of power that constituted what sociologist C. Wright Mills called 'the power elite.' Using a deft combination of academic research and telling anecdotes, the book examines the backgrounds and careers of such well-known members of the power elite as attorney general Alberto Gonzales, secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, former secretary of state Colin Powell, and former CEO of Hewlett-Packard Carly Fiorina to explain why and how the power elite has diversified and the effect this diversification has had on the way power works in the United States.

Politics

Author: Hendrik Hertzberg
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101200928
Size: 22.80 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Cause for jubilation: One of America’s wisest and most necessary voices has distilled what he knows about politics, broadly speaking, into one magnificent volume. Here at last are Henrik Hertzberg’s most significant, hilarious, and devastating dispatches from the American scene he has chronicled for four decades with an uncanny blend of moral seriousness, high spirits, and perfect rhetorical pitch. Politics is at once the story of American life from LBJ to GWB and a testament to the power of the written word in the right hands. In those hands, politics encompasses everyone from Jerry Garcia to Rush Limbaugh, every place from New Hampshire to Nicaragua, and everything from Playboy vs. Penthouse to Bush vs. Gore. Hendrik Hertzberg breaks down American politics into its component parts—campaigns, debates, rhetoric, the media, wars (cultural, countercultural, and real), high crimes and misdemeanors, the right, and more. Each section begins with a new piece of writing framing the subject at hand and contains the choicest, most illuminating pieces from his body of work. Politics is a tour of the defining moments of American life from the mid-’60s till the mid-’00s, a ride though recent American history with one of the most insightful and engaging guides imaginable, a writer who consistently makes us see more clearly and feel more deeply. “Politics is invaluable for all sorts of reasons—chief among them being decades of elegant writing in the service of surgical intelligence.”—Toni Morrison

The Color Of Crime

Author: Katheryn Russell-Brown
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814776179
Size: 72.35 MB
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America is the most punitive nation in the world, incarcerating more than 2.3 million people—or one in 136 of its residents. Against the backdrop of this unprecedented mass imprisonment, punishment permeates everyday life, carrying with it complex cultural meanings. In The Culture of Punishment, Michelle Brown goes beyond prison gates and into the routine and popular engagements of everyday life, showing that those of us most distanced from the practice of punishment tend to be particularly harsh in our judgments. The Culture of Punishment takes readers on a tour of the sites where culture and punishment meet—television shows, movies, prison tourism, and post 9/11 new war prisons—demonstrating that because incarceration affects people along distinct race and class lines, it is only a privileged group of citizens who are removed from the experience of incarceration. These penal spectators, who often sanction the infliction of pain from a distance, risk overlooking the reasons for democratic oversight of the project of punishment and, more broadly, justifications for the prohibition of pain.

The New Black

Author: Kenneth Mack
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1595587993
Size: 68.44 MB
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Since the election of President Barack Obama, Americans have struggled to understand a world of race relations that has changed profoundly since the 60s-era struggles for equality. For this incisive, accessible volume, a group of the nation’s eminent public intellectuals explore what, in fact, has changed—or not. The contributors, including Lani Guinier, Glenn Loury, Paul Butler, Melissa Harris-Lacewell, Elizabeth Alexander, Orlando Patterson, Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Lawrence Bobo, and many others, took this as an invitation to think well beyond the debates prompted by the civil rights movement and its aftermath, challenging conventional wisdom on all fronts. In a book with relevance for all Americans, The New Face of Race shows how the deep social transformations since the 1960s, in such areas as immigration patterns, the image of black women, and the changing political power of African Americans and other groups, have shifted the ground beneath our feet even as the terms of debate over race and inequality have largely stayed the same. A major new effort to move this debate forward—and to address the real and persistent inequalities more effectively—this book offers a vital set of fresh ideas and intellectual tools for facing the new century.