Spiritual Modalities

Author: William FitzGerald
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271056223
Size: 59.46 MB
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"Explores prayer as a rhetorical art, examining situations, strategies, and performative modes of discourse directed to the divine"--Provided by publisher.

Spiritual Modalities

Author: William FitzGerald
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271069031
Size: 66.50 MB
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A bold recasting of prayer as a rhetorical art, Spiritual Modalities investigates situations, strategies, and performative modes of discourse directed to divine audiences. Examining how prayer “works,” Spiritual Modalities reads prayer’s situations and strategies, its characteristic acts and attitudes, to advance an understanding of prayer as a basic expression of our rhetorical capacities for communication and communion. This groundbreaking analysis demonstrates how prayer draws on fundamental capacities to engage other beings rhetorically to argue that we are never more human than when we address the nonhuman. Spiritual Modalities is notable in its aim to articulate a critical rhetoric of prayer in a secular idiom. It draws on contributions to rhetorical theory from Kenneth Burke along with a broad range of classical and contemporary perspectives on audience, address, speech acts, and modes of performance. The book also takes a multicultural and multimodal approach to prayer as rhetorical performance. The texts and practices of prayer represented range across religious traditions and historical eras and include both verbal and physical modes of divine address. The book will be of interest to scholars researching religious language, Burkean approaches to discourse, practices of memory, and media studies.

Spiritual Modalities

Author: William FitzGerald
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271060522
Size: 58.20 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6512
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A bold recasting of prayer as a rhetorical art, Spiritual Modalities investigates situations, strategies, and performative modes of discourse directed to divine audiences. Examining how prayer “works,” Spiritual Modalities reads prayer’s situations and strategies, its characteristic acts and attitudes, to advance an understanding of prayer as a basic expression of our rhetorical capacities for communication and communion. This groundbreaking analysis demonstrates how prayer draws on fundamental capacities to engage other beings rhetorically to argue that we are never more human than when we address the nonhuman. Spiritual Modalities is notable in its aim to articulate a critical rhetoric of prayer in a secular idiom. It draws on contributions to rhetorical theory from Kenneth Burke along with a broad range of classical and contemporary perspectives on audience, address, speech acts, and modes of performance. The book also takes a multicultural and multimodal approach to prayer as rhetorical performance. The texts and practices of prayer represented range across religious traditions and historical eras and include both verbal and physical modes of divine address. The book will be of interest to scholars researching religious language, Burkean approaches to discourse, practices of memory, and media studies.

Humanism And The Rhetoric Of Toleration

Author: Gary Remer
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271042826
Size: 57.28 MB
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Religious toleration is much discussed these days. But where did the Western notion of toleration come from? In this thought-provoking book Gary Remer traces arguments for religious toleration back to the Renaissance, demonstrating how humanist thinkers initiated an intellectual tradition that has persisted even to our present day. Although toleration has long been recognized as an important theme in Renaissance humanist thinking, many scholars have mistakenly portrayed the humanists as proto-Englightenment rationalists and nascent liberals. Remer, however, offers the surprising conclusion that humanist thinking on toleration was actually founded on the classical tradition of rhetoric. It was the rhetorician's commitment to decorum, the ability to argue both sides of an issue, and the search for an acceptable epistemological standard in probability and consensus that grounded humanist arguments for toleration. Remer also finds that the primary humanist model for a full-fledged theory of toleration was the Ciceronian rhetorical category of sermo (conversation). The historical scope of this book is wide-ranging. Remer begins by focusing on the works of four humanists: Desiderius Erasmus, Jacobus Acontius, William Chillingworth, and Jean Bodin. Then he considers the challenge posed to the humanist defense of toleration by Thomas Hobbes and Pierre Bayle. Finally, he shows how humanist ideas have continued to influence arguments for toleration even after the passing of humanism&—from John Locke to contemporary American discussions of freedom of speech.

Jaepl

Author: Joona Smitherman Trapp
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781602355743
Size: 26.24 MB
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JAEPL Volume 19 Winter 2013-2014 THE JOURNAL OF THE ASSEMBLY FOR EXPANDED PERSPECTIVES ON LEARNING, JAEPL, provides a forum to encourage research, theory, and classroom practices involving expanded concepts of language. It contributes to a sense of community in which scholars and educators from pre-school through the university exchange points of view and cutting-edge approaches to teaching and learning. JAEPL is especially interested in helping those teachers who experiment with new strategies for learning to share their practices and confirm their validity through publication in professional journals. CONTENTS OF VOLUME 19: AEPL Keynote: "Using Careless Speech for Careful, Well-Crafted Writing-Whatever Its Style" by Peter Elbow "Sheep in Wolves' Clothing: How Composition's Social Construction Reinstates Expressivist Solipsism" by Keith Rhodes and Monica McFawn Robinson "The Journey Metaphor's Entailments for Framing Learning" by Bradley Smith "A Teacher's Terminal Illness in the Secondary Classroom" by Sarah Hochstetler "It's (Not) Just a Figure of Speech: Recuing Metaphor" by Anna O. Soter "The Power of the Poetic Lens: Why Teachers Need to Read Poems Together" by Amy L. Eva, Carrie A. Bemis, Marie F. Quist, and Bill Hollands "Stillness in the Composition Classroom: Insight, Incubation, Improvisation, Flow, and Meditation" by Ryan Crawford and Andreas Willhoff "Fear Not the Trunchbull: How Teaching from a Humorous Outlook Supports Transformative Learning" by Kathleen Cassity "Thoughts on Teaching as a Practice of Love" by Sharon Marshall "Out of the Box: Teaching and Learning in Other Ways" by Ilene Dawn Alexander BOOK REVIEWS: Judy Halden-Sullivan, "Making the Familiar Unfamiliar" Karen Walker reviews Ritchhart, Ron, Mark Church, and Karin Morrison, Making Thinking Visible Timothy Shea reviews Jobrack, Beverlee. Tyranny of the Textbook. Julie Nichols reviews FitzGerald, William. Spiritual Modalities: Prayer as Rhetoric and Performance Edward Sullivan reviews Quesada, Donna. The Buddha in the Classroom: Zen Wisdom to Inspire Teachers CONNECTING: Helen Walker, "Gratitude" Bob Randolph, "Poetry Teacher's Prayer" Leigh Ann Chow, "What Teachers Carry" Andrea Saylor, "A Brief History of Holy Writing" Jill Moyer Sunday, "For My Students" Kattie Hogan and Matt Ittig, "Lines on the Body: Confronting Personal Experiences through Poetry" John Patrick Cleary, "New Teacher" CONTRIBUTORS' BIOS

Cold War Progressives

Author: Jacqueline L. Castledine
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 025203726X
Size: 16.12 MB
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In recognizing the relation between gender, race, and class oppression, American women of the postwar Progressive Party made the claim that peace required not merely the absence of violence, but also the presence of social and political equality. For progressive women, peace was the essential thread that connected the various aspects of their activist agendas. This study maps the routes taken by postwar popular front women activists into peace and freedom movements of the 1960s and 1970s. Historian Jacqueline Castledine tells the story of their decades-long effort to keep their intertwined social and political causes from unraveling and to maintain the connections among peace, feminism, and racial equality. Postwar progressive women and their allies often saw themselves as members of a popular front promoting the rights of workers, women, and African Americans under the banner of peace. However, the Cold War indelibly shaped the contours of their activism. Following the Progressive Party's demise in the 1950s, these activists reentered social and political movements in the early 1960s and met the inescapable reality that their agenda was a casualty of the left-liberal political division of the early Cold War era. Many Americans now viewed peace as a leftist concern associated with Soviet sympathizers and civil rights as the favored cause of liberals. Faced with the dilemma of working to reunite these movements or choosing between them, some progressive women chose to lead such New Left organizations as the Jeannette Rankin Brigade while others became leaders of liberal "second wave" feminist movements. Whether they committed to affiliating with groups that emphasized one issue over others or attempted to found groups with broad popular-front type agendas, Progressive women brought to their later work an understanding of how race, class, and gender intersect in women's organizing. These women's stories demonstrate that the ultimate result of Cold War-era McCarthyism was not the defeat of women's activism, but rather its reconfiguration.

Rhetorics Of Motherhood

Author: Lindal Buchanan
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809332213
Size: 57.46 MB
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The Conversation Frame

Author: Esther Pascual
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company
ISBN: 9027266506
Size: 60.70 MB
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This edited volume brings together the latest research on fictive interaction, that is the use of the frame of ordinary conversation as a means to structure cognition (talking to oneself), discourse (monologues organized as dialogues), and grammar (“why me? attitude”). This follows prior work on the subject by Esther Pascual and other authors, most of whom are also contributors to this volume. The 17 chapters in the volume explore fictive interaction as a fundamental cognitive phenomenon, as a ubiquitous discourse-structuring device, as a possibly universal linguistic construction, and as an effective communicative strategy in persuasion and language pathology. The data discussed involve a wide variety of unrelated languages (spoken and signed) and modes of communication (oral, written, visual), across cultural contexts and historical time. The research presented combines linguistics and cognitive science, while bridging the gap between core grammatical studies and modern conversation and discourse analysis. The volume further reaches across what may be the most basic divide in linguistics: that between descriptive, theoretical, and applied linguistics.

Writing Home

Author: Eli Goldblatt
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809330865
Size: 45.77 MB
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In this engrossing memoir, poet and literacy scholar Eli Goldblatt shares the intimate ways reading and writing influenced the first thirty years of his life—in the classroom but mostly outside it. Writing Home: A Literacy Autobiography traces Goldblatt’s search for home and his growing recognition that only through his writing life can he fully contextualize the world he inhabits. Goldblatt connects his educational journey as a poet and a teacher to his conception of literacy, and assesses his intellectual, emotional, and political development through undergraduate and postgraduate experiences alongside the social imperatives of the era. He explores his decision to leave medical school after he realized that he could not compartmentalize work and creative life or follow in his surgeon father’s footsteps. A brief first marriage rearranged his understanding of gender and sexuality, and a job teaching in an innercity school initiated him into racial politics. Literacy became a dramatic social reality when he witnessed the start of the national literacy campaign in postrevolutionary Nicaragua and spent two months finding his bearings while writing poetry in Mexico City. Goldblatt presents a thoughtful and exquisitely crafted narrative of his life to illustrate that literacy exists at the intersection of individual and social life and is practiced in relationship to others. While the concept of literacy autobiography is a common assignment in undergraduate and graduate writing courses, few books model the exercise. Writing Home helps fill that void and, with Goldblatt’s emphasis on “out of school” literacy, fosters an understanding of literacy as a social practice.

Kenneth Burke The Posthuman

Author: Chris Mays
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271080310
Size: 21.72 MB
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While rhetoric as a discipline is firmly planted in humanism and anthropology, posthumanism seeks to leave the human behind. This highly original examination of Kenneth Burke’s thought grapples with these ostensibly contradictory concepts as opportunities for invention, revision, and, importantly, transdisciplinary knowledge making. Rather than simply mapping posthumanist rhetorics onto Burke’s scholarship, Kenneth Burke + The Posthuman focuses on the multiplicity of ideas found both in his work and in the idea of posthumanism. Taking varied approaches organized within a framework of boundaries and futures, the contributors show that studying the humanist theories of Burke in this way creates a satisfyingly chaotic web of interconnections. The essays look at how Burke’s writing on the human mind and technology, from his earliest works to his very latest revisions, interrelates with current concepts such as new materiality and coevolution. Throughout, the contributors pay close attention to the fluidity, concerns, and contradictions inherent in language, symbolism, and subjectivity. A unique, illuminating exploration of the contested relationship between bodies and language, this inherently transdisciplinary book will propel important future inquiry by scholars of rhetoric, Burke, and posthumanism. In addition to the editors, the contributors are Casey Boyle, Kristie Fleckenstein, Nathan Gale, Julie Jung, Steven B. Katz, Steven LeMieux, Jodie Nicotra, Jeff Pruchnic, Timothy Richardson, Thomas Rickert, and Robert Wess.