Sovereignty

Author: Dieter Grimm
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231539304
Size: 12.38 MB
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Dieter Grimm’s accessible introduction to the concept of sovereignty ties the evolution of the idea to historical events, from the religious conflicts of sixteenth-century Europe to today’s trends in globalization and transnational institutions. Grimm wonders whether recent political changes have undermined notions of national sovereignty, comparing manifestations of the concept in different parts of the world. Geared for classroom use, the study maps various notions of sovereignty in relation to the people, the nation, the state, and the federation, distinguishing between internal and external types of sovereignty. Grimm’s book will appeal to political theorists and cultural-studies scholars and to readers interested in the role of charisma, power, originality, and individuality in political rule.

Political Theology

Author: Paul W. Kahn
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231153414
Size: 33.84 MB
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In this strikingly original work, Paul W. Kahn rethinks the meaning of political theology. In a text innovative in both form and substance, he describes an American political theology as a secular inquiry into ultimate meanings sustaining our faith in the popular sovereign. Kahn works out his view through an engagement with Carl Schmitt's 1922 classic, Political Theology: Four Chapters on the Concept of Sovereignty. He forces an engagement with Schmitt's four chapters, offering a new version of each that is responsive to the American political imaginary. The result is a contemporary political theology. As in Schmitt's work, sovereignty remains central, yet Kahn shows how popular sovereignty creates an ethos of sacrifice in the modern state. Turning to law, Kahn demonstrates how the line between exception and judicial decision is not as sharp as Schmitt led us to believe. He reminds readers that American political life begins with the revolutionary willingness to sacrifice and that both sacrifice and law continue to ground the American political imagination. Kahn offers a political theology that has at its center the practice of freedom realized in political decisions, legal judgments, and finally in philosophical inquiry itself.

The Scaffolding Of Sovereignty

Author: Zvi Ben-Dor Benite
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231171870
Size: 31.11 MB
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What is sovereignty? Often taken for granted or seen as the ideology of European states vying for supremacy and conquest, the concept of sovereignty remains underexamined both in the history of its practices and in its aesthetic and intellectual underpinnings. Using global intellectual history as a bridge between approaches, periods, and areas, The Scaffolding of Sovereignty deploys a comparative and theoretically rich conception of sovereignty to reconsider the different schemes on which it has been based or renewed, the public stages on which it is erected or destroyed, and the images and ideas on which it rests. The essays in The Scaffolding of Sovereignty reveal that sovereignty has always been supported, complemented, and enforced by a complex aesthetic and intellectual scaffolding. This collection takes a multidisciplinary approach to investigating the concept on a global scale, ranging from an account of a Manchu emperor building a mosque to a discussion of the continuing power of Lenin’s corpse, from an analysis of the death of kings in classical Greek tragedy to an exploration of the imagery of “the people” in the Age of Revolutions. Across seventeen chapters that closely study specific historical regimes and conflicts, the book’s contributors examine intersections of authority, power, theatricality, science and medicine, jurisdiction, rulership, human rights, scholarship, religious and popular ideas, and international legal thought that support or undermine different instances of sovereign power and its representations.

Archaeology Of The Political

Author: Elías José Palti
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023154247X
Size: 45.68 MB
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In the past few decades, the focus of political-philosophical reflection has been reoriented to penetrate that dimension of reality known as "the political." Many of the key figures in contemporary political theory—Jacques Rancière, Alain Badiou, Reinhart Koselleck, Giorgio Agamben, Ernesto Laclau, and Slavoj Žižek, among others—have dedicated themselves to explaining and elaborating on the concept of the political, but in many cases they take the political for granted, as if it were a given, an eternal essence. In An Archaeology of the Political, Elías José Palti argues that the realm of the political is not a natural, transhistorical entity. Instead, he claims that the horizon of the political arose in the context of a series of changes that affirmed the power of absolute monarchies in seventeenth-century Europe and was successively reconfigured from this period up to the present. Palti traces this series of redefinitions accompanying alterations in the regimes of power, creating a genealogy of the concept of the political. Perhaps most important, An Archaeology of the Political demonstrates that transposing ideas from one historical context into another invariably inflicts violence on the conceptual framework from which all political ideas take their meanings.

Life And Money

Author: Ute Astrid Tellmann
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231544073
Size: 17.69 MB
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Life and Money uncovers the contentious history of the boundary between economy and politics in liberalism. Avoiding the established categories of state and market, Ute Tellmann focuses instead on the shifting historical ontologies of liberal economy. Bringing economics into conversation with political theory, cultural economy, postcolonial thought, and history, Tellmann gives a radically novel interpretation of scarcity and money that focuses on materiality, temporality, and affect. She argues that our understanding of the malleability of economic relations has been circumscribed by linking its displacement to colonial hierarchies of civilization and the biopolitics of the nation. Life and Money investigates the conceptual shifts regarding economic order in the wake of the French Revolution and the Great Depression. During the first period, Thomas Robert Malthus’s writings on population crucially linked liberalism to a notion of economic necessity that stands counter to political promises of equality. During the second, John Maynard Keynes’s macroeconomic theory signaled the birth of the managed economy in liberalism and the dominance of the state in economic affairs. Both periods, Tellmann shows, represent a double movement of opening and delimiting the political-economic imagination. A genealogical account retrieves the openness of economic thinking that emerged at these historical junctures. Complementing Michel Foucault’s influential account of liberal governmentality, Life and Money opens up liberalism, including our neoliberal present, to a new sense of economic and political possibility.

Globalization And Sovereignty

Author: Jean L. Cohen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139560263
Size: 44.57 MB
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Sovereignty and the sovereign state are often seen as anachronisms; Globalization and Sovereignty challenges this view. Jean L. Cohen analyzes the new sovereignty regime emergent since the 1990s evidenced by the discourses and practice of human rights, humanitarian intervention, transformative occupation, and the UN targeted sanctions regime that blacklists alleged terrorists. Presenting a systematic theory of sovereignty and its transformation in international law and politics, Cohen argues for the continued importance of sovereign equality. She offers a theory of a dualistic world order comprised of an international society of states, and a global political community in which human rights and global governance institutions affect the law, policies, and political culture of sovereign states. She advocates the constitutionalization of these institutions, within the framework of constitutional pluralism. This book will appeal to students of international political theory and law, political scientists, sociologists, legal historians, and theorists of constitutionalism.

Cases In International Relations

Author: Donald M. Snow
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1538107295
Size: 41.28 MB
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This bestselling text presents original case studies that survey the state of the international system and look in depth at issues of current interest. Offering more than the standard collection of journal articles, it provides a coherent and accessible approach that encourages students to put international relations concepts to practical use.

Sovereignty

Author: Robert Jackson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 074565472X
Size: 14.51 MB
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Sovereignty is at the very centre of the political and legal arrangements of the modern world. The idea originated in the controversies and wars, both religious and political, of 16th and 17th century Europe and since that time it has continued to spread and evolve. Today sovereignty is a global system of authority: it extends across all religions, civilizations, languages, cultures, ethnic and racial groupings, and other collectivities into which humanity is divided. In this highly accessible book, Robert Jackson provides a concise and comprehensive introduction to the history and meaning of sovereignty. Drawing on a wide range of examples from the US Declaration of Independence to terrorist attacks of 9/11 he shows how sovereignty operates in our daily lives and analyses the issues raised by its universality and centrality in the organization of the world. The book covers core topics such as the discourse of sovereignty, the global expansion of sovereignty, the rise of popular sovereignty, and the relationship between sovereignty and human rights. It concludes by examining future challenges facing sovereignty in an era of globalization. This interdisciplinary study will be of interest to a wide range of students, academics and general readers who seek to understand this fundamental concept of the modern world.

Sovereignty In Fragments

Author: Hent Kalmo
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139495232
Size: 31.25 MB
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The political make-up of the contemporary world changes with such rapidity that few attempts have been made to consider with adequate care, the nature and value of the concept of sovereignty. What exactly is meant when one speaks about the acquisition, preservation, infringement or loss of sovereignty? This book revisits the assumptions underlying the applications of this fundamental category, as well as studying the political discourses in which it has been embedded. Bringing together historians, constitutional lawyers, political philosophers and experts in international relations, Sovereignty in Fragments seeks to dispel the illusion that there is a unitary concept of sovereignty of which one could offer a clear definition. This book will appeal to scholars and advanced students of international relations, international law and the history of political thought.