South Of Pico

Author: Kellie Jones
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822374161
Size: 53.64 MB
Format: PDF
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Named a Best Art Book of 2017 by the New York Times and Artforum In South of Pico Kellie Jones explores how the artists in Los Angeles's black communities during the 1960s and 1970s created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism. Emphasizing the importance of African American migration, as well as L.A.'s housing and employment politics, Jones shows how the work of black Angeleno artists such as Betye Saar, Charles White, Noah Purifoy, and Senga Nengudi spoke to the dislocation of migration, L.A.'s urban renewal, and restrictions on black mobility. Jones characterizes their works as modern migration narratives that look to the past to consider real and imagined futures. She also attends to these artists' relationships with gallery and museum culture and the establishment of black-owned arts spaces. With South of Pico, Jones expands the understanding of the histories of black arts and creativity in Los Angeles and beyond.

South Of Pico

Author: Kellie Jones
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780822361459
Size: 75.36 MB
Format: PDF
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Kellie Jones traces how the artists in L.A.'s black communities during the 1960s and 70s created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism through the production of art works that spoke to African American migration and L.A.'s racial politics.

South Of Pico

Author: Kellie Jones
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780822361640
Size: 29.77 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6782
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Kellie Jones traces how the artists in L.A.'s black communities during the 1960s and 70s created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism through the production of art works that spoke to African American migration and L.A.'s racial politics.

Eyeminded

Author: Kellie Jones
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082234873X
Size: 63.38 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Selections of writing by the influential art critic and curator Kellie Jones reveal her role in bringing attention to the work of African American, African, Latin American, and women artists.

Now Dig This

Author: Kellie Jones
Publisher: Prestel Pub
ISBN: 9783791351360
Size: 52.62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This comprehensive, lavishly illustrated catalogue offers an in-depth survey of the incredibly vital but often overlooked legacy of Los Angeles's African American artists, featuring many never-before-seen works.

Slim Harpo

Author: Martin Hawkins
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807164550
Size: 22.76 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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As Louis Armstrong forever tethered jazz to New Orleans and Clifton Chenier fixed Lafayette as home to zydeco, Slim Harpo established Baton Rouge as a base for the blues. In the only complete biography of this internationally renowned blues singer and musician, Martin Hawkins traces Harpo’s rural upbringing near Louisiana’s capital, his professional development fostered by the local music scene, and his national success with R&B hits like Rainin’ in My Heart, Baby Scratch My Back, and I’m A King Bee, among others. Hawkins follows Harpo’s global musical impact from the early 1960s to today and offers a detailed look at the nature of the independent recording business that enabled his remarkable legacy. With new research and interviews, Hawkins fills in previous biographical gaps and redresses misinformation about Harpo’s life. In addition to weaving the musician’s career into the lives of other Louisiana blues players—including Lightnin’ Slim, Lazy Lester, and Silas Hogan—the author discusses the pioneering role of Crowley, Louisiana, record producer J. D. Miller and illustrates how Excello Records in Nashville brought national attention to Harpo’s music recorded in Louisiana. This engaging narrative examines Harpo’s various recording sessions and provides a detailed discography, as well as a list of blues-related records by fellow Baton Rouge artists. Slim Harpo: Blues King Bee of Baton Rouge will stand as the ultimate resource on the musician’s life and the rich history of Baton Rouge’s blues heritage.

Fundamentals Of Picoscience

Author: Klaus D. Sattler
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1466505095
Size: 62.79 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Now ubiquitous in public discussions about cutting-edge science and technology, nanoscience has generated many advances and inventions, from the development of new quantum mechanical methods to far-reaching applications in electronics and medical diagnostics. Ushering in the next technological era, Fundamentals of Picoscience focuses on the instrumentation and experiments emerging at the picometer scale. One picometer is the length of a trillionth of a meter. Compared to a human cell of typically ten microns, this is roughly ten million times smaller. In this state-of-the-art book, international scientists and researchers at the forefront of the field present the materials and methods used at the picoscale. They address the key challenges in developing new instrumentation and techniques to visualize and measure structures at this sub-nanometer level. With numerous figures, the book will help you: Understand how picoscience is an extension of nanoscience Determine which experimental technique to use in your research Connect basic studies to the development of next-generation picoelectronic devices The book covers various approaches for detecting, characterizing, and imaging at the picoscale. It then presents picoscale methods ranging from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to spectroscopic approaches at sub-nanometer spatial and energy resolutions. It also covers novel picoscale structures and picometer positioning systems. The book concludes with picoscale device applications, including single molecule electronics and optical computers. Introductions in each chapter explain basic concepts, define technical terms, and give context to the main material.

Black Arts West

Author: Daniel Widener
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822392623
Size: 17.47 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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From postwar efforts to end discrimination in the motion-picture industry, recording studios, and musicians’ unions, through the development of community-based arts organizations, to the creation of searing films critiquing conditions in the black working class neighborhoods of a city touting its multiculturalism—Black Arts West documents the social and political significance of African American arts activity in Los Angeles between the Second World War and the riots of 1992. Focusing on the lives and work of black writers, visual artists, musicians, and filmmakers, Daniel Widener tells how black cultural politics changed over time, and how altered political realities generated new forms of artistic and cultural expression. His narrative is filled with figures invested in the politics of black art and culture in postwar Los Angeles, including not only African American artists but also black nationalists, affluent liberal whites, elected officials, and federal bureaucrats. Along with the politicization of black culture, Widener explores the rise of a distinctive regional Black Arts Movement. Originating in the efforts of wartime cultural activists, the movement was rooted in the black working class and characterized by struggles for artistic autonomy and improved living and working conditions for local black artists. As new ideas concerning art, racial identity, and the institutional position of African American artists emerged, dozens of new collectives appeared, from the Watts Writers Workshop, to the Inner City Cultural Center, to the New Art Jazz Ensemble. Spread across generations of artists, the Black Arts Movement in Southern California was more than the artistic affiliate of the local civil-rights or black-power efforts: it was a social movement itself. Illuminating the fundamental connections between expressive culture and political struggle, Black Arts West is a major contribution to the histories of Los Angeles, black radicalism, and avant-garde art.

Listening To Images

Author: Tina M. Campt
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822373580
Size: 74.13 MB
Format: PDF
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In Listening to Images Tina M. Campt explores a way of listening closely to photography, engaging with lost archives of historically dismissed photographs of black subjects taken throughout the black diaspora. Engaging with photographs through sound, Campt looks beyond what one usually sees and attunes her senses to the other affective frequencies through which these photographs register. She hears in these photos—which range from late nineteenth-century ethnographic photographs of rural African women and photographs taken in an early twentieth-century Cape Town prison to postwar passport photographs in Birmingham, England and 1960s mug shots of the Freedom Riders—a quiet intensity and quotidian practices of refusal. Originally intended to dehumanize, police, and restrict their subjects, these photographs convey the softly buzzing tension of colonialism, the low hum of resistance and subversion, and the anticipation and performance of a future that has yet to happen. Engaging with discourses of fugitivity, black futurity, and black feminist theory, Campt takes these tools of colonialism and repurposes them, hearing and sharing their moments of refusal, rupture, and imagination.