Seventh Day Adventists And The Civil Rights Movement

Author: Samuel G. London
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1604732857
Size: 22.28 MB
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Seventh-day Adventists and the Civil Rights Movement is the first in-depth study of the denomination's participation in civil rights politics. It considers the extent to which the. denomination's theology influenced how its members responded. This book explores. why a brave few Adventists became social and political activists, and why a majority of. the faithful eschewed the movement. Samuel G. London, Jr., provides a clear yet critical understanding of the history and. theology of the Seventh-day Adventist Church while highlighting the contributions of its. members to political reform. Community awareness, the example of early Adventist. pioneers, liberationist interpretations of the Bible, as well as various intellectual and. theological justifications motivated the civil rights activities of some Adventists. For. those who participated in the civil rights movement, these factors superseded the. conservative ideology and theology that came to dominate the church after the passing. of its founders. Covering the end of the 1800s through the 1970s, the book discusses. how Christian fundamentalism, the curse of Ham, the philosophy of Booker T. Washington, pragmatism, the aversion to ecumenism and the Social Gospel, belief in the. separation of church and state, and American individualism converged to impact. Adventist sociopolitical thought.

Seventh Day Adventists And The Civil Rights Movement

Author: Samuel G. London, Jr.
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781617030642
Size: 55.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7379
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Seventh-day Adventists and the Civil Rights Movement is the first in-depth study of the denomination's participation in civil rights politics. It considers the extent to which the denomination's theology influenced how its members responded. This book explores why a brave few Adventists became social and political activists, and why a majority of the faithful eschewed the movement. Samuel G. London, Jr., provides a clear, yet critical understanding of the history and theology of the Seventh-day Adventist Church while highlighting the contributions of its members to political reform. Community awareness, the example of early Adventist pioneers, liberationist interpretations of the Bible, as well as various intellectual and theological justifications motivated the civil rights activities of some Adventists. For those who participated in the civil rights movement, these factors superseded the conservative ideology and theology that came to dominate the church after the passing of its founders. Covering the end of the 1800s through the 1970s, the book discusses how Christian fundamentalism, the curse of Ham, the philosophy of Booker T. Washington, pragmatism, the aversion to ecumenism and the Social Gospel, belief in the separation of church and state, and American individualism converged to impact Adventist sociopolitical thought.

Seventh Day Adventists And The Civil Rights Movement

Author: Samuel G. London
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781604732726
Size: 75.96 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 4315
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Seventh-day Adventists and the Civil Rights Movement is the first in-depth study of the denomination's participation in civil rights politics. It considers the extent to which the denomination's theology influenced how its members responded. This book explores why a brave few Adventists became social and political activists, and why a majority of the faithful eschewed the movement. Samuel G. London, Jr., provides a clear, yet critical understanding of the history and theology of the Seventh-day Adventist Church while highlighting the contributions of its members to political reform. Community awareness, the example of early Adventist pioneers, liberationist interpretations of the Bible, as well as various intellectual and theological justifications motivated the civil rights activities of some Adventists. For those who participated in the civil rights movement, these factors superseded the conservative ideology and theology that came to dominate the church after the passing of its founders. Covering the end of the 1800s through the 1970s, the book discusses how Christian fundamentalism, the curse of Ham, the philosophy of Booker T. Washington, pragmatism, the aversion to ecumenism and the Social Gospel, belief in the separation of church and state, and American individualism converged to impact Adventist sociopolitical thought.

Lewis C Sheafe

Author: Douglas Morgan
Publisher: Review and Herald Pub Assoc
ISBN: 0828023972
Size: 41.85 MB
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Born just as the Civil War began, Lewis Sheafe grew to manhood at a pivotal moment in American history. But instead of racial equality, the nation offered its freed slaves further oppression and injustice. Sheafestrong-willed, dynamic, and seemingly tirelesshad but two main objectives: uplift his people spiritually and socially, and consistently adhere to biblical principle in all aspects of life. In this gripping biography Douglas Morgan pieces together the life of this forgotten leader whose story sheds light on the reason that no lasting, separate Black Adventist denomination ever formed.

Seneca Falls And The Origins Of The Women S Rights Movement

Author: Sally McMillen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199758609
Size: 64.31 MB
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In a quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the woman's rights movement and change the course of history. The implications of that remarkable convention would be felt around the world and indeed are still being felt today. In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Woman's Rights Movement, the latest contribution to Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments in American History series, Sally McMillen unpacks, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book covers 50 years of women's activism, from 1840-1890, focusing on four extraordinary figures--Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. McMillen tells the stories of their lives, how they came to take up the cause of women's rights, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the lasting and transformative effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time. Indeed, looking back at the convention two years later, Anthony called it "the grandest and greatest reform of all time--and destined to be thus regarded by the future historian." In this lively and warmly written study, Sally McMillen may well be the future historian Anthony was hoping to find. A vibrant portrait of a major turning point in American women's history, and in human history, this book is essential reading for anyone wishing to fully understand the origins of the woman's rights movement.

A Brief History Of Seventh Day Adventists

Author: George R. Knight
Publisher: Review and Herald Pub Assoc
ISBN: 0828014302
Size: 25.49 MB
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This book is a story of how Adventists came to view themselves as a prophetic people, of their growing awareness of a resposibility to take their unique message to all the world, and of their organizational and institutional development as they sought to fulfill their prophetic mission. By the end of this volume, you as a reader and I as a author will find ourselves in the flow of Adventist history. - Millerite Roots. Era of Doctrinal Development. Era of Organizational Development. Era of Institutional and Lifestyle Development. Era of Revival, Reform, and Expansion. Era of Reorganization and Crisis. Era of Worldwide Growth.The Challenges and Possibilities of Maturity.

Prophetess Of Health

Author: Ronald L. Numbers
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 0802803954
Size: 47.48 MB
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Respected historian of science Ronald Numbers here examines one of the most influential, yet least examined, religious leaders in American history -- Ellen G. White, the enigmatic visionary who founded the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Numbers scrutinizes White's life (1827 1915), from her teenage visions and testimonies to her extensive advice on health reform, which influenced the direction of the church she founded. This third edition features a new preface and two key documents that shed further light on White -- transcripts of the trial of Elder Israel Dammon in 1845 and the proceedings of the secret Bible Conferences in 1919."

The Southern Work

Author: Ellen Gould Harmon White
Publisher: Review and Herald Pub Assoc
ISBN: 9780828018234
Size: 67.86 MB
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Reprint of a 1901 booklet giving guidance for doing evangelistic work among Southern Blacks.

Black Maverick

Author: David T. Beito
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252034201
Size: 49.80 MB
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The long-awaited biography of a colorful and enterprising civil rights leader

America S Secret Jihad

Author: Stuart Wexler
Publisher: Counterpoint
ISBN: 1619026899
Size: 58.51 MB
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The conventional narrative concerning religious terrorism inside the United States says that the first salvo occurred in 1993, with the first attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. This narrative has motivated more than a decade of wars, and re-prioritized America’s domestic security and law enforcement agenda. But the conventional narrative is wrong. A different group of jihadists exists within US borders. This group has a long but hidden history, is outside the purview of public officials and has an agenda as apocalyptic as anything Al Qaeda has to offer. Radical sects of Christianity have inspired some of the most grotesque acts of violence in American history: the 1963 Birmingham Church bombing that killed four young girls; the “Mississippi Burning” murders of three civil rights workers in 1964; the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968, the Atlanta Child Murders in the late 1970s; and the Oklahoma City Bombing in 1995.America's Secret Jihad uses these crimes to tell a story that has not been told before. Expanding upon the author’s ground-breaking work on the Martin Luther King, Jr. murder, and through the use of extensive documentation, never-before-released interviews, and a re-interpretation of major events, America's Secret Jihad paints a picture of Christian extremism and domestic terrorism as it has never before been portrayed.