Sentencing And Criminal Justice

Author: Andrew Ashworth
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107057884
Size: 56.12 MB
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The leading textbook on sentencing, and the only one to integrate theory and empirical research with legislation, guidelines and case law.

Sentencing And The Legitimacy Of Trial Justice

Author: Ralph Henham
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136657436
Size: 52.18 MB
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This book discusses the under-researched relationship between sentencing and the legitimacy of punishment. It argues that there is an increasing gap between what is perceived as legitimate punishment and the sentencing decisions of the criminal courts. Drawing on a wide variety of empirical research evidence, the book explores how sentencing could be developed within a more socially-inclusive framework for the delivery of trial justice. In the international context, such developments are directly relevant to the future role of the International Criminal Court, especially its ability to deliver more coherent and inclusive trial outcomes that contribute to social reconstruction. Similarly, in the national context, these issues have a vital role to play in helping to re-position trial justice as a credible cornerstone of criminal justice governance where social diversity persists. In so doing the book should help policy-makers in appreciating the likely implications for criminal trials of ‘mainstreaming’ restorative forms of justice. Sentencing and the Legitimacy of Trial Justice firmly ties the issue of legitimacy to the relevant context for delivering ‘justice’. It suggests a need to develop the tools and methods for achieving this and offers some novel solutions to this complex problem. This book will be a valuable resource for graduate students, academics, practitioners and policy makers in the field of criminal justice as well as scholars interested in socio-legal and cross-disciplinary approaches to the analysis of criminal process and sentencing and the development of theory and comparative methodology in this area.

Social Worlds Of Sentencing

Author: Jeffery T. Ulmer
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791434970
Size: 72.80 MB
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Combines quantitative and qualitative data in a careful investigation of sentencing processes and context under Pennsylvania's sentencing guidelines.

Sentencing Policy And Social Justice

Author: Ralph Henham
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191029041
Size: 28.56 MB
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Sentencing Policy and Social Justice argues that the promotion of social justice should become a key objective of sentencing policy, advancing the argument that the legitimacy of sentencing ultimately depends upon the strength of the relationship between social morality and penal ideology. It sheds light on how shared moral values can influence sentencing policy at a time when relationships of community appear increasingly fragmented, arguing that sentencing will be better placed to make a positive contribution to social justice if it becomes more sensitive to the commonly-accepted moral boundaries that underpin adherence to the 'rule of law'. The need to reflect public opinion in sentencing has received significant attention more recently, with renewed interest in jury sentencing, 'stakeholder sentencing', and the involvement of community views when regulating policy. The author, however, advocates a different approach, combining a new theoretical focus with practical suggestions for reform, and arguing that the contribution sentencing can make to social justice necessitates a fundamental change in the way shared values about the advantages of punishment are reflected in penal ideology and sentencing policy. Using examples from international, comparative and domestic contexts to advance the moral and ethical case for challenging the existing theories of sentencing, the book develops the author's previous theoretical ideas and outlines how these changes could be given practical shape within the context of sentencing in England and Wales. It assesses the consequences for penal governance due to increased state regulation of discretionary sentencing power and examines the prospects for achieving the kind of moral transformation regarded as necessary to reverse such a move. To illustrate these issues each chapter focuses on a particularly problematic area for contemporary sentencing policy; namely, the sentencing of women; the sentencing of irregular migrants; sentencing for offences of serious public disorder; and sentencing for financial crime.

Boys Among Men

Author: David L. Myers
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275982546
Size: 10.85 MB
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Sheds new light on the popular but controversial move to charge, try, and sentence juvenile offenders as adults.

The Criminal Process

Author: Andrew Ashworth
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199547289
Size: 46.72 MB
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Andrew Ashworth and Mike Redmayne address one of the most controversial areas of the entire criminal process - the pre-trial stage. Following the detention of suspects in police custody, the authors examine key issues in the pre-trial process.

Sentencing And Punishment

Author: Susan Easton
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019874482X
Size: 10.40 MB
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Examining the theoretical debates behind the headlines and engaging with current debates, Sentencing and Punishment provides thoughtful, impartial, and unbiased coverage of sentencing and punishment in the UK. Collectively, Susan Easton and Christine Piper are highly experienced teachers andresearchers in this field, making them perfectly placed to deliver this lively account of a highly dynamic subject area. The book takes a thorough and systematic approach to sentencing and punishment, examining key topics from legal, philosophical, and practical perspectives. Offering in-depth and detailed coverage, while remaining succinct and readable, the authors deliver a balanced approach to the subject. Chaptersummaries, discussion questions, and case studies help students to engage with the subject, apply their knowledge, and reflect upon debates. Fully reworked, restructured, and updated for this edition, and incorporating changes following the 2015 general election; this is the essential guide for anyone studying sentencing and punishment as part of a law or criminology course. The book is accompanied by an Online Resource Centre featuring:* Regular updates on case law, new legislation and key developments* Web links to further reading suggestions for each chapter of the book* Guidance on answering end of chapter questions * An online version of the textbook glossary

The Oxford Handbook Of Sentencing And Corrections

Author: Kevin R. Reitz
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190241446
Size: 19.58 MB
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It is no secret that America's sentencing and corrections systems are in crisis, and neither system can be understood or repaired fully without careful consideration of the other. This handbook examines the intertwined and multi-layered fields of American sentencing and corrections from global and historical viewpoints, from theoretical and policy perspectives, and with close attention to many problem-specific arenas. Editors Joan Petersilia and Kevin R. Reitz, both leaders in their respective fields, bring together a group of preeminent scholars to present state-of-the art research, investigate current practices, and explore the implications of new and varied approaches wherever possible. The handbook's contributors bridge the gap between research and policy across a range of topics including an overview of mass incarceration and its collateral effects, explorations of sentencing theories and their applications, analyses of the full spectrum of correctional options, and first-hand accounts of life inside of and outside of prison. Individual chapters reflect expertise and source materials from multiple fields including criminology, law, sociology, psychology, public policy, economics, political science, and history. Proving that the problems of sentencing and corrections, writ large, cannot be addressed effectively or comprehensively within the confines of any one discipline, The Oxford Handbook of Sentencing and Corrections is a vital reference volume on these two related and central components of America's ongoing experiment in mass incarceration.

Sentencing Law And Policy

Author: Nora Demleitner
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
ISBN: 1454897694
Size: 51.54 MB
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One of the foremost books in Sentencing Law, the new fourth edition continues in the tradition of its predecessors by giving students a comprehensive overview of modern sentencing practices. Authored by leading scholars, this casebook provides thorough examination of underlying doctrine, motivates students to tackle the important policy and political issues that animate sentencing practices, and poses challenging questions and hypotheticals to stimulate class discussion and independent thought. Key Features: More streamlined focus. Material covered in the third edition has been updated and streamlined reducing the length by more than 400 pages. Chapters 7-11 in the previous edition have been expanded and updated and are now available online. Thoroughly updated to address important statutory and case law changes, including important U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Court of Appeals, state appellate court decisions and recent scholarship. Coverage of modern policy issues, including mass incarceration, prosecutorial and judicial discretion, punishment for drug crimes, revised federal and state sentencing guidelines, racial and other disparities in sentencing, and topics associated with administration of the death penalty. Expanded Teachers Manual with sample syllabi and other supporting materials to help professors construct personalized teaching plans that integrate the text and online materials.

Sentencing Fragments

Author: Michael H. Tonry
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190204680
Size: 37.95 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Sentencing matters. Life, liberty, and property are at stake. Convicted offenders and victims care about it for obvious reasons, while judges and prosecutors also have a moral stake in the process. Never-the-less, the current system of sentencing criminal offenders is in a shambles, with acrazy quilt of incompatible and conflicting laws, policies, and practices in each state, not to mention an entirely different process at the federal level.In Sentencing Fragments, Michael Tonry traces four decades of American sentencing policy and practice to illuminate the convoluted sentencing system, from early reforms in the mid-1970's to the transition towards harsher sentences in the mid-1980's. The book combines a history of policy with anexamination of current research findings regarding the consequences of the sentencing system, calling attention to the devastatingly unjust effects on the lives of the poor and disadvantaged. Tonry concludes with a set of proposals for creating better policies and practices for the future, with thehope of ultimately creating a more just legal system.Lucid and engaging, Sentencing Fragments sheds a much-needed light on the historical foundation for the current dynamic of the American criminal justice system, while simultaneously offering a useful tool for potential reform.