Science In The Age Of Computer Simulation

Author: Eric Winsberg
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226902048
Size: 55.61 MB
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Computer simulation was first pioneered as a scientific tool in meteorology and nuclear physics in the period following World War II, but it has grown rapidly to become indispensible in a wide variety of scientific disciplines, including astrophysics, high-energy physics, climate science, engineering, ecology, and economics. Digital computer simulation helps study phenomena of great complexity, but how much do we know about the limits and possibilities of this new scientific practice? How do simulations compare to traditional experiments? And are they reliable? Eric Winsberg seeks to answer these questions in Science in the Age of Computer Simulation. Scrutinizing these issue with a philosophical lens, Winsberg explores the impact of simulation on such issues as the nature of scientific evidence; the role of values in science; the nature and role of fictions in science; and the relationship between simulation and experiment, theories and data, and theories at different levels of description. Science in the Age of Computer Simulation will transform many of the core issues in philosophy of science, as well as our basic understanding of the role of the digital computer in the sciences.

Science In The Age Of Computer Simulation

Author: Eric Winsberg
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226902029
Size: 12.58 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 4209
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Computer simulation was first pioneered as a scientific tool in meteorology and nuclear physics in the period following World War II, but it has grown rapidly to become indispensible in a wide variety of scientific disciplines, including astrophysics, high-energy physics, climate science, engineering, ecology, and economics. Digital computer simulation helps study phenomena of great complexity, but how much do we know about the limits and possibilities of this new scientific practice? How do simulations compare to traditional experiments? And are they reliable? Eric Winsberg seeks to answer these questions in Science in the Age of Computer Simulation. Scrutinizing these issue with a philosophical lens, Winsberg explores the impact of simulation on such issues as the nature of scientific evidence; the role of values in science; the nature and role of fictions in science; and the relationship between simulation and experiment, theories and data, and theories at different levels of description. Science in the Age of Computer Simulation will transform many of the core issues in philosophy of science, as well as our basic understanding of the role of the digital computer in the sciences.

Philosophy And Climate Science

Author: Eric Winsberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108173888
Size: 22.92 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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There continues to be a vigorous public debate in our society about the status of climate science. Much of the skepticism voiced in this debate suffers from a lack of understanding of how the science works - in particular the complex interdisciplinary scientific modeling activities such as those which are at the heart of climate science. In this book Eric Winsberg shows clearly and accessibly how philosophy of science can contribute to our understanding of climate science, and how it can also shape climate policy debates and provide a starting point for research. Covering a wide range of topics including the nature of scientific data, modeling, and simulation, his book provides a detailed guide for those willing to look beyond ideological proclamations, and enriches our understanding of how climate science relates to important concepts such as chaos, unpredictability, and the extent of what we know.

Reconstructing Reality

Author: Margaret Morrison
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199380279
Size: 62.49 MB
Format: PDF
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This text examines issues related to the way modelling and simulation enable us to reconstruct aspects of the world we are investigating. It also investigates the processes by which we extract concrete knowledge from those reconstructions and how that knowledge is legitimated.

Computer Age Statistical Inference

Author: Bradley Efron
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108107958
Size: 39.35 MB
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The twenty-first century has seen a breathtaking expansion of statistical methodology, both in scope and in influence. 'Big data', 'data science', and 'machine learning' have become familiar terms in the news, as statistical methods are brought to bear upon the enormous data sets of modern science and commerce. How did we get here? And where are we going? This book takes us on an exhilarating journey through the revolution in data analysis following the introduction of electronic computation in the 1950s. Beginning with classical inferential theories - Bayesian, frequentist, Fisherian - individual chapters take up a series of influential topics: survival analysis, logistic regression, empirical Bayes, the jackknife and bootstrap, random forests, neural networks, Markov chain Monte Carlo, inference after model selection, and dozens more. The distinctly modern approach integrates methodology and algorithms with statistical inference. The book ends with speculation on the future direction of statistics and data science.

Mathematical Modeling And Digital Simulation For Engineers And Scientists

Author: Jon M. Smith
Publisher: Wiley-Interscience
ISBN:
Size: 17.69 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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An updated and expanded edition that now reflects the many recent developments in simulation and computer modeling theory and practice. Gives fast and accurate numerical methods that are ideally suited to simulating both linear and nonlinear systems for design and for ``real time'' training. Includes a new section on the use of modern numerical methods for generating chaos and simulating random processes, provides information on simulator verification, and integrates material on the personal computer throughout the text. Also gives examples of computer programs in BASIC, and new material on the development and application of numerical methods in both the time and frequency domains. Expanded references.

Understanding Molecular Simulation

Author: Daan Frenkel
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 9780080519982
Size: 60.23 MB
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Understanding Molecular Simulation: From Algorithms to Applications explains the physics behind the "recipes" of molecular simulation for materials science. Computer simulators are continuously confronted with questions concerning the choice of a particular technique for a given application. A wide variety of tools exist, so the choice of technique requires a good understanding of the basic principles. More importantly, such understanding may greatly improve the efficiency of a simulation program. The implementation of simulation methods is illustrated in pseudocodes and their practical use in the case studies used in the text. Since the first edition only five years ago, the simulation world has changed significantly -- current techniques have matured and new ones have appeared. This new edition deals with these new developments; in particular, there are sections on: · Transition path sampling and diffusive barrier crossing to simulaterare events · Dissipative particle dynamic as a course-grained simulation technique · Novel schemes to compute the long-ranged forces · Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian dynamics in the context constant-temperature and constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulations · Multiple-time step algorithms as an alternative for constraints · Defects in solids · The pruned-enriched Rosenbluth sampling, recoil-growth, and concerted rotations for complex molecules · Parallel tempering for glassy Hamiltonians Examples are included that highlight current applications and the codes of case studies are available on the World Wide Web. Several new examples have been added since the first edition to illustrate recent applications. Questions are included in this new edition. No prior knowledge of computer simulation is assumed.

Simulations For Solid State Physics Paperback Without Cd Rom

Author: Robert H. Silsbee
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521599115
Size: 79.44 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This new and exciting interactive resource centers around fourteen high quality computer simulations covering essential topics in solid state physics. The simulations cover x-ray diffraction, phonons, electron states and dynamics, semiconductors, magnetism, and dislocations. Users can vary different characteristics and immediately see the results in animations and graphical displays. The companion book is essential for effective use of the simulations. It guides the user through hundreds of exercises and examples, illustrates fundamental physical principles, and contains notes on the relevant physics. This paperback (without CD-ROM) is intended for students who have access to the simulations on a local area network. This package provides an interactive resource for those studying solid state physics at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. It will also be of interest and value to researchers in physics, materials science, electrical engineering, chemistry and chemical engineering.

Computer Simulations And The Changing Face Of Scientific Experimentation

Author: Juan M. Durán
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443849952
Size: 65.84 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Computer simulations have become a central tool for scientific practice. Their use has replaced, in many cases, standard experimental procedures. This goes without mentioning cases where the target system is empirical but there are no techniques for direct manipulation of the system, such as astronomical observation. To these cases, computer simulations have proved to be of central importance. The question about their use and implementation, therefore, is not only a technical one but represents a challenge for the humanities as well. In this volume, scientists, historians, and philosophers join to examine computer simulations in scientific practice. One central aim of the volume is to provide a multi-perspective view on the topic. Therefore, the text includes philosophical studies on computer simulations, as well as case studies from simulation practice, and historical studies of the evolution of simulations as a research method. The theoretical studies in this book discuss the epistemological relation between simulations and experiments as well as the empirical or non-empirical status of data resulting from computer simulations. The role of simulations in current scientific practice is examined in the cases of astronomy, system biology, nanoscale research, and in the pharmaceutical industry. The historical perspective is brought in by examining the rise of supercomputing as well as the exploding number of published simulation studies in some scientific fields. The book concludes with critical reflections on the potential, limitations, and failures of computer simulations.