Schooling Poor Minority Children

Author: Martha R. Bireda
Publisher: R&L Education
ISBN: 1607098849
Size: 18.18 MB
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Schooling Poor Minority Children: New Segregation in the Post-Brown Era explores the 'redesign of school segregation' and explains why resegregation of schools in the post-Brown era is so destructive for poor minority students.

Walking In Circles

Author: Barbara A. Sizemore
Publisher: Third World Pr
ISBN:
Size: 67.54 MB
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In this examination of the American school system, a career education expert determines how existing policies have kept inner-city youth at a disadvantage—citing, among other issues, the achievement gap between black and white students—and lays the groundwork for future improvements.

After Brown

Author: Charles T. Clotfelter
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 140084133X
Size: 25.39 MB
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The United States Supreme Court's 1954 landmark decision, Brown v. Board of Education, set into motion a process of desegregation that would eventually transform American public schools. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of how Brown's most visible effect--contact between students of different racial groups--has changed over the fifty years since the decision. Using both published and unpublished data on school enrollments from across the country, Charles Clotfelter uses measures of interracial contact, racial isolation, and segregation to chronicle the changes. He goes beyond previous studies by drawing on heretofore unanalyzed enrollment data covering the first decade after Brown, calculating segregation for metropolitan areas rather than just school districts, accounting for private schools, presenting recent information on segregation within schools, and measuring segregation in college enrollment. Two main conclusions emerge. First, interracial contact in American schools and colleges increased markedly over the period, with the most dramatic changes occurring in the previously segregated South. Second, despite this change, four main factors prevented even larger increases: white reluctance to accept racially mixed schools, the multiplicity of options for avoiding such schools, the willingness of local officials to accommodate the wishes of reluctant whites, and the eventual loss of will on the part of those who had been the strongest protagonists in the push for desegregation. Thus decreases in segregation within districts were partially offset by growing disparities between districts and by selected increases in private school enrollment.

Dismantling Desegregation

Author: Gary Orfield
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1565844017
Size: 43.50 MB
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Discusses the reversal of desegration in public schools

Education And Sociology

Author: David Levinson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113557085X
Size: 41.75 MB
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First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Law And School Reform

Author: Jay Philip Heubert
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300082968
Size: 48.22 MB
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Nearly every effort to reform American public education during the past half-century has involved the law. Partnerships and tensions between lawyers, educators, parents, and scholars have never been more central to the future shape and direction of our schools. This book examines six of the most important and controversial school reform initiatives: school desegregation, school finance reform, special education, education of immigrant children, integration of youth services, and enforceable performance mandates. The contributors - leading authorities in the fields of education and law - examine these reform efforts from the perspectives of law, education, research, and practice.

Why Busing Failed

Author: Matthew F. Delmont
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520284259
Size: 63.39 MB
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"Busing, in which students were transported by school buses to achieve court ordered or voluntary school desegregation, became one of the nation's most controversial civil rights issues in the decades after Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Examining battles over school desegregation in cities like Boston, Chicago, New York, and Pontiac, Why Busing Failed shows how school officials, politicians, courts, and the news media valued the desires of white parents more than the rights of black students, and how antibusing parents and politicians borrowed media strategies from the civil rights movement to thwart busing for school desegregation. This national history of busing brings together well-known political figures such as Richard Nixon and Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, with less well known figures like Boston civil rights activist Ruth Batson, Florida Governor Claude Kirk, Pontiac housewife and antibusing activist Irene McCabe, and Clay Smothers (the self-proclaimed "most conservative black man in America"). This book shows that shows that "busing" failed to more fully desegregate public schools because school officials, politicians, courts, and the news media valued the desires of white parents more than the rights of black students"--Provided by publisher.

Still Separate And Unequal

Author: Barry A. Gold
Publisher: Teachers College Pr
ISBN: 9780807747575
Size: 10.14 MB
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Racially separate schools cannot be equal even if funding levels are the same as wealthy White school districts, according to Barry A. Gold in his provocative new book. By documenting the effects that the New Jersey Supreme Court Abbott V decision had on schools and classrooms, Gold argues that Abbott V, along with NCLB, actually widened the educational gap between middle-class White students and minority students by creating a new but less effective type of urban education. This in-depth examination describes and analyzes the actual behavior of administrators and teachers to understand how and why these educational reforms failed. This book features; reports on the two most important reforms of urban education in U.S. historythe New Jersey Supreme Court Abbott V ruling and NCLB.; rich case studies of 7 years of urban elementary reform; and an explanation of why reform efforts failed to achieve their intended outcomes. It identifies ways to improve future urban education reforms.

The Pursuit Of Racial And Ethnic Equality In American Public Schools

Author: Kristi L. Bowman
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 1628952393
Size: 37.52 MB
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In 1954 the Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education; ten years later, Congress enacted the Civil Rights Act. These monumental changes in American law dramatically expanded educational opportunities for racial and ethnic minority children across the country. They also changed the experiences of white children, who have learned in increasingly diverse classrooms. The authors of this commemorative volume include leading scholars in law, education, and public policy, as well as important historical figures. Taken together, the chapters trace the narrative arc of school desegregation in the United States, beginning in California in the 1940s, continuing through Brown v. Board, the Civil Rights Act, and three important Supreme Court decisions about school desegregation and voluntary integration in 1974, 1995, and 2007. The authors also assess the status of racial and ethnic equality in education today and consider the viability of future legal and policy reform in pursuit of the goals of Brown v. Board. This remarkable collection of voices in conversation with one another lays the groundwork for future discussions about the relationship between law and educational equality, and ultimately for the creation of new public policy. A valuable reference for scholars and students alike, this dynamic text is an important contribution to the literature by an outstanding group of authors.

Savage Inequalities

Author: Jonathan Kozol
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0770435688
Size: 42.80 MB
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For two years, beginning in 1988, Jonathan Kozol visited schools in neighborhoods across the country, from Illinois to Washington D.C., and from New York to San Antonio. He spoke with teachers, principals, superintendents, and, most important, children. What he found was devastating. Not only were schools for rich and poor blatantly unequal, the gulf between the two extremes was widening—and it has widened since. The urban schools he visited were overcrowded and understaffed, and lacked the basic elements of learning—including books and, all too often, classrooms for the students. In Savage Inequalities, Kozol delivers a searing examination of the extremes of wealth and poverty and calls into question the reality of equal opportunity in our nation's schools.