Rock Art Of The Lower Pecos

Author: Carolyn E. Boyd
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781585442591
Size: 24.47 MB
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Four thousand years ago bands of hunter-gatherers lived in and traveled through the challenging terrain of what is now southwest Texas and northern Mexico. Today travelers to that land can view large art panels they left behind on the rock walls of Rattlesnake Canyon, White Shaman Cave, Panther Cave, Mystic Shelter, and Cedar Springs. Messages from a distant past, they are now interpreted for modern readers by artist-archaeologist Carolyn Boyd. It has been thought that the meaning of this ancient art was lost with the artists who produced it. However, thanks to research breakthroughs, these elaborate rock paintings are again communicating a narrative that was inaccessible to humanity for millennia. In the gateway serpents, antlered shamans, and human-animal–cross forms pictured in these ancient murals, Boyd sees a way that ancient hunter-gatherer artists could express their belief systems, provide a mechanism for social and environmental adaptation, and act as agents in the social, economic, and ideological affairs of the community. She offers detailed information gleaned from the art regarding the nature of the lower Pecos cosmos, ritual practices involving the use of sacramental and medicinal plants, and hunter-gatherer lifeways. Now, combining the tools of the ethnologist with the aesthetic sensibilities of an artist, Boyd demonstrates that prehistoric art is not beyond explanation. Images from the past contain a vast corpus of data—accessible through proven, scientific methods—that can enrich our understanding of human life in prehistory and, at the same time, expand our appreciation for the work of art in the present and the future.

Ancient Texans

Author: Harry J. Shafer
Publisher: Texas Monthly Press
ISBN:
Size: 11.70 MB
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Reconstructs the life of the prehistoric inhabitants of Texas and describes Texas archaeological efforts

The White Shaman Mural

Author: Carolyn E. Boyd
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477310304
Size: 65.95 MB
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Folded plate (1 leaf, 39 x 61 cm, folded to 19 x 16 cm) in pocket.

How War Began

Author: Keith F. Otterbein
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781585443307
Size: 12.59 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Have humans always fought and killed each other, or did they peacefully coexist until states developed? Is war an expression of human nature or an artifact of civilization? Questions about the origin and inherent motivations of warfare have long engaged philosophers, ethicists, anthropologists as they speculate on the nature of human existence. In How War Began, author Keith F. Otterbein draws on primate behavior research, archaeological research, data gathered from the Human Relations Area Files, and a career spent in research and reflection on war to argue for two separate origins. He identifies two types of military organization: one which developed two million years ago at the dawn of humankind, wherever groups of hunters met, and a second which developed some five thousand years ago, in four identifiable regions, when the first states arose and proceeded to embark upon military conquests. In carefully selected detail, Otterbein marshals the evidence for his case that warfare was possible and likely among early Homo sapiens. He argues from analogy with other primates, from Paleolithic rock art depicting wounded humans, and from rare skeletal remains with embedded weapon points to conclude that warfare existed and reached a peak in big game hunting societies. As the big game disappeared, so did warfare—only to reemerge once agricultural societies achieved a degree of political complexity that allowed the development of professional military organizations. Otterbein concludes his survey with an analysis of how despotism in both ancient and modern states spawns warfare. A definitive resource for anthropologists, social scientists and historians, How War Began is written for all who are interested in warfare and individuals who seek to understand the past and the present of humankind.

Painters In Prehistory

Author: Harry J. Shafer
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781595340863
Size: 64.93 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"The remnants of prehistoric Lower Pecos people reveal lifeways unlike those anywhere in the world. The people who inhabited what is now Texas left artifacts that provide information about 12,000 years of existence, the last 7,000 of which are still astoundingly evident. Includes maps, charts, tables, photographs, and drawings"--Provided by publisher.

The Rock Art Of Texas Indians

Author: Forrest Kirkland
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780292753266
Size: 38.46 MB
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The petroglyphs and pictographs reproduced here, states Professor Newcomb, "are relatively rare and absolutely irreplaceable human documents. They can often reveal much about the ways of ancient men, including aspects of life which otherwise would forever go unrecorded, for they may illustrate how a vanished, nameless people perceived themselves and their world, their relation to God and to each other, and their fantasies and fears. They are, then, a treasure to be valued and a heritage to be preserved."

The White Shaman Mural

Author: Carolyn E. Boyd
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477310304
Size: 16.62 MB
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Folded plate (1 leaf, 39 x 61 cm, folded to 19 x 16 cm) in pocket.

The Prehistory Of Texas

Author: Timothy K. Perttula
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603446494
Size: 51.20 MB
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Paleoindians first arrived in Texas more than eleven thousand years ago, although relatively few sites of such early peoples have been discovered. Texas has a substantial post-Paleoindian record, however, and there are more than fifty thousand prehistoric archaeological sites identified across the state. This comprehensive volume explores in detail the varied experience of native peoples who lived on this land in prehistoric times. Chapters on each of the regions offer cutting-edge research, the culmination of years of work by dozens of the most knowledgeable experts. Based on the archaeological record, the discussion of the earliest inhabitants includes a reclassification of all known Paleoindian projectile point types and establishes a chronology for the various occupations. The archaeological data from across the state of Texas also allow authors to trace technological changes over time, the development of intensive fishing and shellfish collecting, funerary customs and the belief systems they represented, long-term changes in settlement mobility and character, landscape use, and the eventual development of agricultural societies. The studies bring the prehistory of Texas Indians all the way up through the Late Prehistoric period (ca. a.d. 700–1600). The extensively illustrated chapters are broadly cultural-historical in nature but stay strongly focused on important current research problems. Taken together, they present careful and exhaustive considerations of the full archaeological (and paleoenvironmental) record of Texas.

Pecos River Style Rock Art

Author: James Burr Harrison MacRae
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781623496401
Size: 20.88 MB
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Pecos River style pictographs are one of the most complex forms of rock art worldwide. The dramatic prehistoric pictographs on the limestone overhangs of the lower Pecos and Devils Rivers in West Texas have been the subject of preservation and study since the 1930s, and dedicated research continues to this day. The medium is large-scale, polychrome pictographs in open rock shelter settings, emphasizing the animistic/shamanistic religion practiced by the local aboriginal peoples. Creating large-scale rock murals required intelligence, skill, and knowledge. These enigmatic images, some dating to 4,500 years ago and possibly earlier, depict strange, vaguely human and animal shapes and various geometric forms. While full understanding of the meaning of these images is abstruse, archaeologists and other scholars have identified what they believe to be patterns and religious themes, mixed with what could be figures and objects from everyday life in the local hunter-gatherer culture as it existed in the region centuries before the arrival of colonizing Europeans. Although interpretation of these pictographs remains controversial, in Pecos River Style Rock Art: A Prehistoric Iconography, James Burr Harrison Macrae contributes to the beginnings of a syntactic "grammar" for these images that can be applied in diverse contexts without direct reference to any particular interpretation. "The strength of structural-iconographic analysis," Macrae writes, "is that it relies on repetitive patterns rather than idiosyncratic information, such as trying to make broad inferences from one or only a few sites." Pecos River Style Rock Art offers the framework of an empirical methodology for understanding these ancient artworks.