Rethinking Contexts For Learning And Teaching

Author: Richard Edwards
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134034199
Size: 69.43 MB
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Now that learning is seen as lifelong and lifewide, what specifically makes a learning context? What are the resultant consequences for teaching practices when working in specific contexts? Drawing upon a variety of academic disciplines, Rethinking Contexts for Learning and Teaching explores some of the different means of understanding teaching and learning, both in and across contexts, the issues they raise and their implications for pedagogy and research. It specifically addresses What constitutes a context for learning? How do we engage the full resources of learners for learning? What are the relationships between different learning contexts? What forms of teaching can most effectively mobilise learning across contexts? How do we methodologically and theoretically conceptualise contexts for learning? Drawing upon practical examples and the UK’s TLRP, this book brings together a number of leading researchers to examine the assumptions about context embedded within specific teaching and learning practices. It considers how they might be developed to extend opportunity by drawing upon learning from a range of contexts, including schools, colleges, universities and workplaces.

Improving Learning In College

Author: Roz Ivanic
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134031475
Size: 17.71 MB
Format: PDF
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What's the problem with literacy at college? How might everyday literacy be harnessed for educational ends? Based on the first major study of literacy practices in colleges in the UK, this book explores the reading and writing associated with learning subjects across the college curriculum. It investigates literacy practices in which students engage outside of college, and teaching and learning strategies through which these can help support the curriculum. With insightful analyses of innovative practices, it considers ways of changing teaching practices to enable students to draw upon their full potential. Recent research work has challenged the myth of individual student deficit, arguing cogently that people have ‘funds of knowledge’ from diverse and vibrant cultural roots, and that these have been misguidedly disqualified by the education system. It has claimed that different ‘ways with words’ can provide valuable resources for learning. However, the empirical exploration of this claim has lagged far behind the theoretical debate. Improving Learning in College resolves this by showing the integrity and richness of the literacy practices of a significant population, not previously the focus of such research: those who take vocational and academic college courses in colleges. It addresses an issue which has not until now been developed within this research tradition: that of how these practices can not only be valued and validated, but mobilised and harnessed to enhance learning in educational settings. This book will interest all teachers, teacher-educators and researchers concerned with post-compulsory education and vocational education in compulsory schooling.

Researching Education Through Actor Network Theory

Author: Tara Fenwick
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 111827489X
Size: 15.93 MB
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Researching Education Through Actor-Network Theory offers a new take on educational research, demonstrating the ways in which actor-network theory can expand the understanding of educational change. An international collaboration exploring diverse manifestations of educational change Illustrates the impact of actor-network theory on educational research Positions education as a key area where actor-network theory can add value, as it has been shown to do in other social sciences A valuable resource for anyone interested in the sociology and philosophy of education

Vocational Learning

Author: Ralph Catts
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789400715394
Size: 40.66 MB
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Effective knowing and learning for vocational purposes must take account of the wide range of variables that impact on knowledge formation and that promote learning. In light of those many variables, the formal sector of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) must constantly ask itself what it could and should do to better provide vocational learning for those people likely to pursue learning via the informal sector. This book addresses that question. Vocational Learning: Innovative Theory and Practice discusses four theoretical aspects of vocational learning that support understanding of vocational learning processes and practices: the situations of vocational learning; the power and roles of social networks and identity in vocational learning; knowing and knowledge management processes; and the implications for pedagogic practices in both informal and formal TVET systems. The book provides an overview of a series of international examples of innovative approaches to vocational educational theory and practice, and it draws on empirical research to analyze the effects of those approaches. It includes unique insights into aspects of TVET for Indigenous peoples. With a discussion of policy implications for Europe, North America and Australia, this book is an instrumental tool to understand the underlying factors that generate effective educational and workforce outcomes through effective formal and informal learning.

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Size: 44.94 MB
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

Learning At Not School

Author: Julian Sefton-Green
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262518244
Size: 35.42 MB
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Schools do not define education, and they are not the only institutions in which learning takes place. After-school programs, music lessons, Scouts, summer camps, on-the-job training, and home activities all offer out-of-school educational experiences. In Learning at Not-School, Julian Sefton-Green explores studies and scholarly research on out-of-school learning, investigating just what it is that is distinctive about the quality of learning in these "not-school" settings. Sefton-Green focuses on those organizations and institutions that have developed parallel to public schooling and have emerged as complements, supplements, or attempts to remediate the alleged failures of schools. He reviews salient principles, landmark studies, and theoretical approaches to learning in not-school environments, reporting on the latest scholarship in the field. He examines studies of creative media production and considers ideas of "learning-to learn"-that relate to analyses of language and technology. And he considers other forms of in-formal learning--in the home and in leisure activities--in terms of not-school experiences. Where possible, he compares the findings of US-based studies with those of non-US-based studies, highlighting core conceptual issues and identifying what we often take for granted. Many not-school organizations and institutions set out to be different from schools, embodying different conceptions of community and educational values. Sefton-Green's careful consideration of these learning environments in pedagogical terms offers a crucial way to understand how they work.

A Handbook For Teaching And Learning In Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Size: 13.55 MB
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

Connected Learning An Agenda For Research And Design

Author: Mizuko Ito
Publisher: BookBaby
ISBN: 0988725509
Size: 13.88 MB
Format: PDF
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This report is a synthesis of ongoing research, design, and implementation of an approach to education called “connected learning.” It advocates for broadened access to learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement. This model is based on evidence that the most resilient, adaptive, and effective learning involves individual interest as well as social support to overcome adversity and provide recognition. This report investigates how we can use new media to foster the growth and sustenance of environments that support connected learning in a broad-based and equitable way. This report also offers a design and reform agenda, grounded in a rich understanding of child development and learning, to promote and test connected learning theories. The research is conducted as part of the Connected Learning Research Network, supported by the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning initiative. The research network is an interdisciplinary collaboration among researchers, designers, and practitioners to advance an evidence-driven approach to learning, the design of learning environments, and educational reform that addresses contemporary problems of educational equity.

Thinking Like A Historian

Author: Nikki Mandell
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 0870204831
Size: 35.67 MB
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Thinking Like a Historian: Rethinking History Instruction by Nikki Mandell and Bobbie Malone is a teaching and learning framework that explains the essential elements of history and provides "how to" examples for building historical literacy in classrooms at all grade levels. With practical examples, engaging and effective lessons, and classroom activities that tie to essential questions, Thinking Like a Historian provides a framework to enhance and improve teaching and learning history. We invite you to use Thinking Like a Historian to bring history into your classroom or to re-energize your teaching of this crucial discipline in new ways. The contributors to Thinking Like a Historian are experienced historians and educators from elementary through university levels. This philosophical and pedagogical guide to history as a discipline uses published standards of the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the National Council for History Education, the National History Standards and state standards for Wisconsin and California.

Network Based Language Teaching

Author: Mark Warschauer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521667425
Size: 70.80 MB
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This text provides a critical collection of recent research in on-line communication for second language learning. The paperback edition provides a critical collection of recent research in on-line communication for second language learning, including uses of e-mail, real-time writing, and the Web. Chapters analyze the theories underlying computer-assisted learning, explore the contexts that affect network-based teaching, and examine the linguistic nature of computer-mediated interaction in both textual and multimedia environments. This book will be of vital importance to language teachers and researchers, as well as to readers with a general interest in linguistics, computer-mediated communication, and education.