Restoring Heritage Grains

Author: Eli Rogosa
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603586709
Size: 38.58 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Including recipes for baking with Einkorn Wheat has long been one of the world's most widely consumed and cultivated grains, yet it has been transformed over the course of the past fifty to one hundred years. Once considered as iconic "amber waves of grain" and as an essential staple crop for making "our daily bread" or "staff of life," today we are just as apt to hear about the ill effects of consuming it. Witness the increased incidence of gluten intolerance or "wheat belly." What has changed, in large part, is the way in which we grow our wheat and the modern varieties that have made possible enormous harvests, but at a very steep cost. Large industrial farming, dependent on monocultures and the heavy use of fertilizers and herbicides, can have deleterious effects, not only on our own health, but that of our land, water, and environment as a whole. Fortunately, heritage "landrace" wheats--crops that have been selected over generations to be well adapted to their local environments--do not need bio-chemical interventions to grow well and yield bountifully. Yet these robust and diverse wheats that nourished our ancestors for countless generations are nearly extinct today. In Restoring Heritage Grains, author Eli Rogosa, of the Heritage Grain Conservancy, invites readers to pore over a menagerie of "forgotten" grains: diverse, landrace wheat varieties such as emmer, a strain domesticated in the Fertile Crescent that is perfect for pasta and flatbreads; mirabil, or the "miracle wheat"; durum, a high-protein, low-gluten variety; and Indian wheat, also known as shot, a rare species that is drought-tolerant and high in protein. These and the many other heritage grains Rogosa exhibits each have a lineage intertwined with that of the human species, and can and should be grown once again. Combining the history of grain growing and society, in-depth practical advice on landrace wheat husbandry, wheat folktales and mythology, and recipes for flours, breads, and beers, Restoring Heritage Grains invites readers to explore a rich history that has only recently been overshadowed by modern industrial wheat. In the end, organically grown, diverse wheat may well be one the best solutions to hunger, one that will be needed to feed the world's growing population in the decades to come.

Homegrown Whole Grains

Author: Sara Pitzer
Publisher: Storey Publishing
ISBN: 160342153X
Size: 76.37 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A resource that has everything gardeners need to know to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook small crops of nine types of whole grains also includes fifty recipes to bring whole grains to the family table. Original.

The New Bread Basket

Author: Amy Halloran
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603585680
Size: 47.23 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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For more than 10,000 years, grains have been the staples of Western civilization. The stored energy of grain allowed our ancestors to shift from nomadic hunting and gathering and build settled communities—even great cities. Though most bread now comes from factory bakeries, the symbolism of wheat and bread—amber waves of grain, the staff of life—still carries great meaning. Today, bread and beer are once again building community as a new band of farmers, bakers, millers, and maltsters work to reinvent local grain systems. The New Bread Basket tells their stories and reveals the village that stands behind every loaf and every pint. While eating locally grown crops like heirloom tomatoes has become almost a cliché, grains are late in arriving to local tables, because growing them requires a lot of land and equipment. Milling, malting, and marketing take both tools and cooperation. The New Bread Basket reveals the bones of that cooperation, profiling the seed breeders, agronomists, and grassroots food activists who are collaborating with farmers, millers, bakers, and other local producers. Take Andrea and Christian Stanley, a couple who taught themselves the craft of malting and opened the first malthouse in New England in one hundred years. Outside Ithaca, New York, bread from a farmer-miller-baker partnership has become an emblem in the battle against shale gas fracking. And in the Pacific Northwest, people are shifting grain markets from commodity exports to regional feed, food, and alcohol production. Such pioneering grain projects give consumers an alternative to industrial bread and beer, and return their production to a scale that respects people, local communities, and the health of the environment. Many Americans today avoid gluten and carbohydrates. Yet, our shared history with grains—from the village baker to Wonder Bread—suggests that modern changes in farming and processing could be the real reason that grains have become suspect in popular nutrition. The people profiled in The New Bread Basket are returning to traditional methods like long sourdough fermentations that might address the dietary ills attributed to wheat. Their work and lives make our foundational crops visible, and vital, again.

Fields Of Plenty

Author: Michael Ableman
Publisher: Chronicle Books
ISBN: 9780811842235
Size: 65.64 MB
Format: PDF
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In the face of supersizing and a fast-food nation, a growing community of organic farmers and food artisans are producing sustainable nourishment that is respectful to the land and rich in heritage, flavor, and passion. In Fields of Plenty, respected farmer, teacher, and ecology advocate Michael Ableman seeks out these innovative and committed farmers to reveal how the fruits of those who till the soil go beyond taste. From Knolls farm in California, famous for succulent figs tree-ripened to perfection, to an urban farm in Chicago that sustains an entire community, his odyssey takes him to farmers who are trying to answer questions of sustenance philosophically and, most importantly, in practice. Illustrated with evocative color photographs of the land and the people who work it, and accompanied by a bountiful selection of recipes, this beautifully written memoir reveals the power of food as a personal and cultural force.

The Organic Grain Grower

Author: Jack Lazor
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603583653
Size: 42.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Organic Grain Grower is an invaluable resource for both home-scale and commercial producers interested in expanding their resiliency and drop diversity through growing their own grains. Longtime farmer and organic pioneer Jack Lazor covers how to grow and store wheat, barley, oats, corn, dry beans, soybeans, oilseeds, grasses, nutrient-dense forages, and lesser-known cereals. In addition, Lazor argues the importance of integrating grains on the organic farm (not to mention within the local food system) for reasons of biodiversity and whole-farm management. The Organic Grain Grower provides information on wide-ranging topics, from nutrient density and building soil fertility to machinery and grinding grains for livestock rations.--COVER.

Grain Of Truth

Author: Stephen Yafa
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1594632499
Size: 26.15 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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No topic in nutrition is more controversial than wheat. While some people suggest that wheat may be the new asbestos, Stephen Yafa finds that it has been wrongly demonised. His revealing book sets the record straight, breaking down the botany of the wheat plant we've hijacked for our own use, the science of nutrition and digestion, the effects of mass production on our health and questions about gluten and fibre - all to point us towards a better, richer diet.

Food Genes And Culture

Author: Gary Paul Nabhan
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610914937
Size: 38.90 MB
Format: PDF
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Vegan, low fat, low carb, slow carb: Every diet seems to promise a one-size-fits-all solution to health. But they ignore the diversity of human genes and how they interact with what we eat. In Food, Genes, and Culture, renowned ethnobotanist Gary Nabhan shows why the perfect diet for one person could be disastrous for another. If your ancestors were herders in Northern Europe, milk might well provide you with important nutrients, whereas if you're Native American, you have a higher likelihood of lactose intolerance. If your roots lie in the Greek islands, the acclaimed Mediterranean diet might save your heart; if not, all that olive oil could just give you stomach cramps. Nabhan traces food traditions around the world, from Bali to Mexico, uncovering the links between ancestry and individual responses to food. The implications go well beyond personal taste. Today's widespread mismatch between diet and genes is leading to serious health conditions, including a dramatic growth over the last 50 years in auto-immune and inflammatory diseases. Readers will not only learn why diabetes is running rampant among indigenous peoples and heart disease has risen among those of northern European descent, but may find the path to their own perfect diet.

Hoptopia

Author: Peter A. Kopp
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520277473
Size: 41.75 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Hoptopia argues that the current revolution in craft beer is the product of a complex global history that converged in the hop fields of Oregon's Willamette Valley. What spawned from an ideal environment and the ability of regional farmers to grow the crop rapidly transformed into something far greater because Oregon farmers depended on the importation of rootstock, knowledge, technology, and goods not only from Europe and the Eastern United States but also from Asia, Latin America, and Australasia. They also relied upon a seasonal labor supply of people from all of these areas as a supplement to local Euroamerican and indigenous communities to harvest their crops. In turn, Oregon hop farmers reciprocated in exchanges of plants and ideas with growers and scientists around the world, and, of course, sent their cured hops into the global marketplace. These global exchanges occurred not only during Oregon's golden era of hop growing in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but through to the present in the midst of the craft beer revival. The title of this book, Hoptopia, is a nod to Portland's title of Beervana and the Willamette Valley's claim as an agricultural Eden from the mid-nineteenth century onward. But the story is fundamentally about how seemingly niche agricultural regions do not exist and have never existed independently of the flow of people, ideas, goods, and biology from other parts of the world. To define Hoptopia is to define the Willamette Valley's hop and beer industries as the culmination of all of this local and global history. With the hop itself as a central character, this book aims to connect twenty-first century consumers to agricultural lands and histories that have been forgotten in an era of industrial food production"--Provided by publisher.

Modern Jewish Baker Challah Babka Bagels More

Author: Shannon Sarna
Publisher: The Countryman Press
ISBN: 1682680223
Size: 63.26 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Step-by-step instructions for the seven core doughs of Jewish baking. Jewish baked goods have brought families together around the table for centuries. In Modern Jewish Baker, Sarna pays homage to those traditions while reinvigorating them with modern flavors and new ideas. One kosher dough at a time, she offers the basics for challah, babka, bagels, hamantaschen, rugelach, pita, and matzah. Never one to shy away from innovation, Sarna sends her readers off on a bake-your-own adventure with twists on these classics. Recipes include: Chocolate Chip Hamantaschen Tomato-Basil Challah Everything-Bagel Rugelach S’mores Babka Detailed instructions, as well as notes on make-ahead strategies, ideas for using leftovers, and other practical tips will have even novice bakers braiding beautiful shiny loaves that will make any bubbe proud.

Radical Regenerative Gardening And Farming

Author: Frank Holzman
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1538105993
Size: 36.14 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Radical Regenerative Gardening and Farming informs and inspires gardeners, and farmers, who wish to bring quality and integrity into their work with the land. It is about developing close relationships with land that produces our food. This book combines over 40 years of Frank Holzman’s experience in farming, gardening, education, research, and development to provide techniques and concepts for sustainable land use. Radical Regenerative Gardening and Farming is a more spiritual and thoughtful approach to land stewardship, geared toward aspiring gardeners with a desire for a deeper connection with the earth. It is as much about why as it is about how to develop land. Rather than traditional tractor farming, this book provides a better understanding of horticulture, dealing with the biological interactions between soils and plants, and providing a good understanding of living systems. Holzman examines healthy perspectives of how to approach a piece of land as a living organism and transform it into a balanced ecosystem. Frank Holzman provides lots of information and insight for backyard gardeners and professional farmers, alike. Truly a great resource for transforming the garden, as well as the gardener.