Resources Under Regimes

Author: Paul R. JOSEPHSON
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674039246
Size: 20.52 MB
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Democratic or authoritarian, every society needs clean air and water; every state must manage its wildlife and natural resources. In this provocative, comparative study, Josephson asks to what extent the form of a government and its economy--centrally planned or market, colonial or post-colonial--determines how politicians, bureaucrats, scientists, engineers, and industrialists address environmental and social problems presented by the transformation of nature into a humanized landscape.

A Cultural History Of Modern Science In China

Author: Benjamin A. Elman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674023062
Size: 20.36 MB
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In A Cultural History of Modern Science in China, Elman has retold the story of the Jesuit impact on late imperial China, circa 1600-1800, and the Protestant era in early modern China from the 1840s to 1900 in a concise and accessible form ideal for the classroom.

Practical Matter

Author: Margaret C. Jacob
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674014978
Size: 78.29 MB
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Margaret Jacob and Larry Stewart examine the profound transformation that began in 1687. From the year when Newton published his Principia to the Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851, science gradually became central to Western thought and economic development. The book aims at a general audience and examines how, despite powerful opposition on the Continent, a Newtonian understanding gained acceptance and practical application. By the mid-eighteenth century the new science had achieved ascendancy, and the race was on to apply Newtonian mechanics to industry and manufacturing. They end the story with the temple to scientific and technological progress that was the Crystal Palace exhibition. Choosing their examples carefully, Jacob and Stewart show that there was nothing preordained or inevitable about the centrality awarded to science. "It is easy to forget that science might have been stillborn, or remained the esoteric knowledge of court elites. Instead, for better and for worse, science became a centerpiece of Western culture."

Science And Ideology

Author: Mark Walker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136466622
Size: 61.50 MB
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Does science work best in a democracy? Were 'Soviet' or 'Nazi' science fundamentally different from science in the USA? These questions have been passionately debated in the recent past. Particular developments in science took place under particular political regimes, but they may or may not have been directly determined by them. Science and Ideology brings together a number of comparative case studies to examine the relationship between science and the dominant ideology of a state. Cybernetics in the USA is compared to France and the Soviet Union. Postwar Allied science policy in occupied Germany is juxtaposed to that in Japan. The essays are narrowly focussed, yet cover a wide range of countries and ideologies. The collection provides a unique comparative history of scientific policies and practices in the 20th century.

Science Technology And Medicine In Colonial India

Author: David Arnold
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521563192
Size: 27.87 MB
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An historical reinterpretation of the role of science, technology and medicine in the making of colonial India.

Global Transformations In The Life Sciences 1945 1980

Author: Patrick Manning
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
ISBN: 0822986051
Size: 13.93 MB
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The second half of the twentieth century brought extraordinary transformations in knowledge and practice of the life sciences. In an era of decolonization, mass social welfare policies, and the formation of new international institutions such as UNESCO and the WHO, monumental advances were made in both theoretical and practical applications of the life sciences, including the discovery of life’s molecular processes and substantive improvements in global public health and medicine. Combining perspectives from the history of science and world history, this volume examines the impact of major world-historical processes of the postwar period on the evolution of the life sciences. Contributors consider the long-term evolution of scientific practice, research, and innovation across a range of fields and subfields in the life sciences, and in the context of Cold War anxieties and ambitions. Together, they examine how the formation of international organizations and global research programs allowed for transnational exchange and cooperation, but in a period rife with competition and nationalist interests, which influenced dramatic changes in the field as the postcolonial world order unfolded.

Ultra Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

Author: Robert Kraus Jr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199347883
Size: 54.55 MB
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This book is designed to introduce the reader to the field of NMR/MRI at very low magnetic fields, from milli-Tesla to micro-Tesla, the ultra-low field (ULF) regime. The book is focused on applications to imaging the human brain, and hardware methods primarily based upon pre-polarization methods and SQUID-based detection. The goal of the text is to provide insight and tools for the reader to better understand what applications are best served by ULF NMR/MRI approaches. A discussion of the hardware challenges, such as shielding, operation of SQUID sensors in a dynamic field environment, and pulsed magnetic field generation are presented. One goal of the text is to provide the reader a framework of understanding the approaches to estimation and mitigation of low signal-to-noise and long imaging time, which are the main challenges. Special attention is paid to the combination of MEG and ULF MRI, and the benefits and challenges presented by trying to accomplish both with the same hardware. The book discusses the origin of unique relaxation contrast at ULF, and special considerations for image artifacts and how to correct them (i.e. concomitant gradients, ghost artifacts). A general discussion of MRI, with special consideration to the challenges of imaging at ULF and unique opportunities in pulse sequences, is presented. The book also presents an overview of some of the primary applications of ULF NMR/MRI being pursued.

Thinking Big Data In Geography

Author: Jim Thatcher
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803278829
Size: 67.12 MB
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Thinking Big Data in Geography offers a practical state-of-the-field overview of big data as both a means and an object of research, with essays from prominent and emerging scholars such as Rob Kitchin, Renee Sieber, and Mark Graham. Part 1 explores how the advent of geoweb technologies and big data sets has influenced some of geography’s major subdisciplines: urban politics and political economy, human-environment interactions, and geographic information sciences. Part 2 addresses how the geographic study of big data has implications for other disciplinary fields, notably the digital humanities and the study of social justice. The volume concludes with theoretical applications of the geoweb and big data as they pertain to society as a whole, examining the ways in which user-generated data come into the world and are complicit in its unfolding. The contributors raise caution regarding the use of spatial big data, citing issues of accuracy, surveillance, and privacy.