Reality

Author: Mike Rosen
Publisher: Wilcox Swanson LLC/ DBA Deer Track Publishing
ISBN: 9780982352083
Size: 59.74 MB
Format: PDF
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Short essays based on topics from Rosen's columns published in the Denver post, Rocky Mountain news and other publications, in which the author presents his views on U.S. economics, politics, government and culture.

Applied Economics

Author: Thomas Sowell
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0786722703
Size: 11.36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This revised edition of Applied Economics is about fifty percent larger than the first edition. It now includes a chapter on the economics of immigration and new sections of other chapters on such topics as the “creative” financing of home-buying that led to the current “subprime” mortgage crisis, the economics of organ transplants, and the political and economic incentives that lead to money earmarked for highways being diverted to mass transit and to a general neglect of infrastructure. On these and other topics, its examples are drawn from around the world. Much material in the first edition has been updated and supplemented. The revised and enlarged edition of Applied Economics retains the easy readability of the first edition, even for people with no prior knowledge of economics.

Confucius Never Said

Author: Helen Raleigh
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781499185270
Size: 64.67 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book is a four-generation family journey from repression and poverty in China to freedom and prosperity in the United States. Their lives overlap with many significant historical events taking place in China, such as the founding of Communist China in 1949, the Great Chinese Famine from 1958-1960, the Cultural Revolution from 1966-1976 and the Economic Reform starting from 1980. The author recounts the enormous suffering her family had to endure under Communist China's radical social experiment. Her great-grandfather was denounced by the Chinese Communist Party and his neighbors simply because he owned land. He died in poverty, and his dying wish was never granted. Her grandfather loaned his fishing boat to the Communist Party, and ended up losing his independence and becoming a janitor. Her father escaped his village to get educated and thus survived the Great Famine. He became highly educated, but never joined the Communist Party . . . and was sent to a re-education labor camp because of it. The author herself grew up in China and immigrated to the United States as a young adult. She sought freedom and the American Dream, and found both. This book is about freedom-and about what happens when we let people take our freedom away.

Common Sense Economics

Author: James D. Gwartney
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 125010694X
Size: 55.98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The fully revised and updated third edition of the classic Common Sense Economics.

What Then Must We Do

Author: Gar Alperovitz
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603584919
Size: 49.92 MB
Format: PDF
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Looks at the problems with America's current economic system offers a revolutionary way forward that the author claims is not corporate capitalism or state socialism, but rather a system that is uniquely American.

Democracy For Realists

Author: Christopher H. Achen
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400888743
Size: 61.43 MB
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Democracy for Realists assails the romantic folk-theory at the heart of contemporary thinking about democratic politics and government, and offers a provocative alternative view grounded in the actual human nature of democratic citizens. Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels deploy a wealth of social-scientific evidence, including ingenious original analyses of topics ranging from abortion politics and budget deficits to the Great Depression and shark attacks, to show that the familiar ideal of thoughtful citizens steering the ship of state from the voting booth is fundamentally misguided. They demonstrate that voters—even those who are well informed and politically engaged—mostly choose parties and candidates on the basis of social identities and partisan loyalties, not political issues. They also show that voters adjust their policy views and even their perceptions of basic matters of fact to match those loyalties. When parties are roughly evenly matched, elections often turn on irrelevant or misleading considerations such as economic spurts or downturns beyond the incumbents' control; the outcomes are essentially random. Thus, voters do not control the course of public policy, even indirectly. Achen and Bartels argue that democratic theory needs to be founded on identity groups and political parties, not on the preferences of individual voters. Now with new analysis of the 2016 elections, Democracy for Realists provides a powerful challenge to conventional thinking, pointing the way toward a fundamentally different understanding of the realities and potential of democratic government.

Why Nations Fail

Author: Daron Acemoglu
Publisher: Crown Books
ISBN: 0307719227
Size: 58.10 MB
Format: PDF
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An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.

In Defense Of Elitism

Author: William A. Henry, III
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 1101912413
Size: 40.56 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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From the Pulitzer Prize-winning culture critic for Time magazine comes the tremendously controversial, yet highly persuasive, argument that our devotion to the largely unexamined myth of egalitarianism lies at the heart of the ongoing "dumbing of America." Americans have always stubbornly clung to the myth of egalitarianism, of the supremacy of the individual average man. But here, at long last, Pulitzer Prize-winning critic William A. Henry III takes on, and debunks, some basic, fundamentally ingrained ideas: that everyone is pretty much alike (and should be); that self-fulfillment is more imortant thant objective achievement; that everyone has something significant to contribute; that all cultures offer something equally worthwhile; that a truly just society would automatically produce equal success results across lines of race, class, and gender; and that the common man is almost always right. Henry makes clear, in a book full of vivid examples and unflinching opinions, that while these notions are seductively democratic they are also hopelessly wrong.

American Made

Author: Dan DiMicco
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1137279796
Size: 28.86 MB
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A former chairman of America's most successful steel company challenges myths about the decline of the nation's industry to trace the endurance of manufacturing throughout the recession and identify the vulnerabilities of green jobs and outsourcing.

The Seventies

Author: Bruce J. Schulman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743219481
Size: 25.45 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Most of us think of the 1970s as an "in-between" decade, the uninspiring years that happened to fall between the excitement of the 1960s and the Reagan Revolution. A kitschy period summed up as the "Me Decade," it was the time of Watergate and the end of Vietnam, of malaise and gas lines, but of nothing revolutionary, nothing with long-lasting significance. In the first full history of the period, Bruce Schulman, a rising young cultural and political historian, sweeps away misconception after misconception about the 1970s. In a fast-paced, wide-ranging, and brilliant reexamination of the decade's politics, culture, and social and religious upheaval, he argues that the Seventies were one of the most important of the postwar twentieth-century decades. The Seventies witnessed a profound shift in the balance of power in American politics, economics, and culture, all driven by the vast growth of the Sunbelt. Country music, a southern silent majority, a boom in "enthusiastic" religion, and southern California New Age movements were just a few of the products of the new demographics. Others were even more profound: among them, public life as we knew it died a swift death. The Seventies offers a masterly reconstruction of high and low culture, of public events and private lives, of Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Evel Knievel, est, Nixon, Carter, and Reagan. From The Godfather and Network to the Ramones and Jimmy Buffett; from Billie jean King and Bobby Riggs to Phyllis Schlafly and NOW; from Proposition 13 to the Energy Crisis; here are all the names, faces, and movements that once filled our airwaves, and now live again. The Seventies is powerfully argued, compulsively readable, and deeply provocative.