Race Empire And English Language Teaching

Author: Suhanthie Motha
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807755125
Size: 59.25 MB
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This timely book takes a critical look at the teaching of English, showing how language is used to create hierarchies of cultural privilege in public schools across the country. Motha closely examines the work of four ESL teachers who developed anti-racist pedagogical practices during their first year of teaching. Their experiences, and those of their students, provide a compelling account of how new teachers might gain agency for culturally responsive teaching in spite of school cultures that often discourage such approaches. The author combines current research with her original analyses to shed light on real classroom situations faced by teachers of linguistically diverse populations. This book will help pre- and in-service teachers to think about such challenges as differential achievement between language learners and "native-speakers;" about hierarchies of languages and language varieties; about the difference between an accent identity and an incorrect pronunciation; and about the use of students' first languages in English classes. This resource offers implications for classroom teaching, educational policy, school leadership, and teacher preparation, including reflection questions at the end of each chapter.

Deconstructing Race

Author: Jabari Mahiri
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807757764
Size: 40.70 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Mahiri argues that multicultural education needs to move beyond racial categories defined by the social, political, and economic forces of white supremacy. Exploring contemporary and historical scholarship on race, the emergence of multiculturalism, and the rise of the digital age, Deconstructing Race investigates micro-cultural practices and provides a framework for understanding the diversity of individuals and groups.

Teaching For Equity In Complex Times

Author: Jamy Stillman
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807774901
Size: 75.99 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In schools serving high concentrations of bilingual learners, it can be especially challenging for teachers to maintain commitments to equity-minded instruction while meeting the demands of new educational policies, including national standards. This book details how one school integrated equity pedagogy into a standards-based curriculum and produced exemplary levels of achievement. As the authors illustrate, however, the school’s dual commitment to bilingual education and standards-based reform engendered numerous complex tensions. Specifically, the authors describe teachers’ attempts to balance demands for rigor and content coverage within their high-performing school and with their diverse student population. They identify specific tensions that emerged around the following issues: the degree of academic struggle that is generative for student learning and the point at which such struggle becomes counterproductivethe holding of high expectations for all learners and the provision of differentiated, student-centered learning experiencesthe CCSS emphasis on engaging students around more complex text and the contested determination of what constitutes complexity in text and in teachingthe influence of high-stakes accountability on school norms and practices, including teachers’ interpretations and enactment of new national standardsthe performance pressures placed on teachers in today’s educational policy context "This book offers welcome guidance on dialogical teaching to socially committed teachers and teacher educators." —Linda Valli, University of Maryland A must-read for those interested in transformative teacher learning." —Kris D. Gutiérrez, Carol Liu Professor, GSE, University of California, Berkeley

Understanding English Language Variation In U S Schools

Author: Anne H. Charity Hudley
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807774022
Size: 68.97 MB
Format: PDF
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In today’s culturally diverse classrooms, students possess and use many culturally, ethnically, and regionally diverse English language varieties that may differ from standardized English. This book helps classroom teachers become attuned to these differences and offers practical strategies to support student achievement while fostering positive language attitudes in classrooms and beyond. The text contrasts standardized varieties of English with Southern, Appalachian, and African American English varieties, focusing on issues that are of everyday concern to those who are assessing the linguistic competence of students. Featuring a narrative style with teaching strategies and discussion questions, this practical resource: Provides a clear, introductory explanation of what is meant by non-standard English, from both linguistic and educational viewpoints. Emphasizes what educators needs to know about language variation in and outside of the classroom. Addresses the social factors accompanying English language variation and how those factors interact in real classrooms. “A landmark book. . . . It guides linguists and educators as we all work to apply our knowledge on behalf of those for whom it matters most: students.” —From the Afterword by Walt Wolfram, North Carolina State University “In the ongoing debate about language we typically hear arguments about what students say and/or how they say it. Finally, a volume that takes on the ‘elephant in the parlor’—WHO is saying it. By laying bare the complicated issues of race, culture, region, and ethnicity, Charity Hudley and Mallinson provide a scholarly significant and practically relevant text for scholars and practitioners alike. This is bound to be an important contribution to the literature.” —Gloria Ladson-Billings, University of Wisconsin–Madison “An invaluable guide for teachers, graduate students, and all lovers of language. The authors provide a comprehensive and fascinating account of Southern and African American English, showing how it differs from standardized English, how those differences affect children in the classroom, and how teachers can use these insights to better serve their students.” —Deborah Tannen, University Professor and professor of linguistics, Georgetown University


Enhancing Student Learning In Middle School

Author: Martha Casas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113693894X
Size: 54.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A comprehensive introduction to middle school teaching, this textbook focuses explicitly on instructional strategies that encourage adolescents to become active participants in their own learning within a world of accountability and standardized testing. The author, an experienced middle school teacher and teacher educator, takes a constructivist approach to teaching that considers the whole child, including the emotional, psychological, social, and cultural variables uniquely associated with adolescence. The text examines the full range of middle school topics, from the development and diversity of middle school learners, to the structures, curriculum, and management of the classroom itself. Special features include: "Empowering Middle School Students to Take Ownership of their Learning," "Teaching Scenario," "Key Points," and "Creating an Anti-Oppressive Atmosphere in Your Classroom" textboxes help teachers gain a clearer understanding of content presented and encourage them to become reflective practitioners. Callouts throughout explicitly link chapter content to NMSA standards. Discussion of the unique challenges of actively engaging bilingual students, special needs students, and students exhibiting antisocial behavior. Accounts about middle school students illustrate the ways adolescents think about school and learning. A chapter that focuses on ways teachers can apply the general teaching strategies to specific subject areas. Sample Lesson Plans, Focus Questions, Chapter Summaries, Journal Entries, and Student Activities/Assignments are included throughout to encourage readers to actively participate with the text.

Social Class In Applied Linguistics

Author: David Block
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317974840
Size: 18.18 MB
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In this ground breaking new book David Block proposes a new working definition of social class in applied linguistics. Traditionally, research on language and identity has focused on aspects such as race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, religion and sexuality. Political economy, and social class, as an identity inscription, have been undervalued. This book argues that increasing socioeconomic inequality, which has come with the consolidation of neoliberal policies and practices worldwide, requires changes in how we think about identity and proposes that social class should be brought to the fore as a key construct. Social Class in Applied Linguistics begins with an in-depth theoretical discussion of social class before considering the extent to which social class has been a key construct in three general areas of applied linguistics- sociolinguistics, bi/multilingualism and second language acquisition and learning research. Throughout the book, Block suggests ways in which social class might be incorporated into future applied linguistics research. A critical read for postgraduate students and researchers in the areas of applied linguistics, language education and TESOL.

Introducing Business English

Author: Catherine Nickerson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317439260
Size: 75.79 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Introducing Business English provides a comprehensive overview of this topic, situating the concepts of Business English and English for Specific Business Purposes within the wider field of English for Special Purposes. This book draws on contemporary teaching and research contexts to demonstrate the growing importance of English within international business communication. Covering both spoken and written aspects of Business English, this book: examines key topics within Business English, including teaching Business English as a lingua franca, intercultural business interactions, blended learning and web-based communication; discusses the latest research on each topic, and possible future directions; features tasks and practical examples, a section on course design, and further resources. Written by two leading researchers and teachers, Introducing Business English is a must-read for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students studying Business English, Business English as a Lingua Franca, and English for Specific Business Purposes.

Language Culture And Teaching

Author: Sonia Nieto
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315465671
Size: 16.65 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Distinguished multiculturalist Sonia Nieto speaks directly to current and future teachers in this thoughtful integration of a selection of her key writings with creative pedagogical features. Offering information, insights, and motivation to teach students of diverse cultural, racial, and linguistic backgrounds, examples are included throughout to illustrate real-life dilemmas about diversity that teachers face in their own classrooms; ideas about how language, culture, and teaching are linked; and ways to engage with these ideas through reflection and collaborative inquiry. Designed for upper-undergraduate and graduate-level students and professional development courses, each chapter includes critical questions, classroom activities, and community activities suggesting projects beyond the classroom context. Language, Culture, and Teaching • explores how language and culture are connected to teaching and learning in educational settings; • examines the sociocultural and sociopolitical contexts of language and culture to understand how these contexts may affect student learning and achievement; • analyzes the implications of linguistic and cultural diversity for classroom practices, school reform, and educational equity; • encourages practicing and preservice teachers to reflect critically on their classroom practices, as well as on larger institutional policies related to linguistic and cultural diversity based on the above understandings; and • motivates teachers to understand their ethical and political responsibilities to work, together with their students, colleagues, and families, for more socially just classrooms, schools, and society. Changes in the Third Edition: This edition includes new and updated chapters, section introductions, critical questions, classroom and community activities, and resources, bringing it up-to-date in terms of recent educational policy issues and demographic changes in the U.S. and beyond. The new chapters reflect Nieto’s current thinking about the profession and society, especially about changes in the teaching profession, both positive and negative, since the publication of the second edition of this text.

Beyond Good Teaching

Author: Sylvia Celedon-Pattichis
Publisher: National Council of Teachers of English
ISBN: 9780873536882
Size: 18.72 MB
Format: PDF
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English language learners share a basic need—to engage, and be engaged, in meaningful mathematics. Through guiding principles and instructional tools, together with classroom vignettes and video clips, this book shows how to go beyond good teaching to support ELLs in learning challenging mathematics while developing language skill. Position your students to share the valuable knowledge that they bring to the classroom as they actively build and communicate their understanding. The design of this book is interactive and requires the reader to move back and forth between the chapters and online resources at www.nctm.org/more4u. Occasionally, the reader is asked to stop and reflect before reading further in a chapter. At other times, the reader is asked to view video clips of teaching practices for ELLs or to refer to graphic organizers, observation and analysis protocols, links to resources, and other supplementary materials. The authors encourage the reader to use this resource in professional development.

Native Speakerism In Japan

Author: Stephanie Ann Houghton
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 1847698700
Size: 45.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The relative status of native and non-native speaker language teachers within educational institutions has long been an issue worldwide but until recently, the voices of teachers articulating their own concerns have been rare. This innovative volume explores language-based forms of prejudice against native-speaker teachers.