Queer Cowboys

Author: C. Packard
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137078227
Size: 16.69 MB
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Why do the earliest representations of cowboy-figures symbolizing the highest ideals of manhood in American culture exclude male-female desire while promoting homosocial and homoerotic bonds? Evidence from the best-known Western writers and artists of the post-Civil War period - Owen Wister, Mark Twain, Frederic Remington, George Catlin - as well as now-forgotten writers, illustrators, and photographers, suggest that in the period before the word 'homosexual' and its synonyms were invented, same-sex intimacy and erotic admiration were key aspects of a masculine code. These males-only clubs of journalists, cowboys, miners, Indian vaqueros defined themselves by excluding femininity and the cloying ills of domesticity, while embracing what Roosevelt called 'strenuous living' with other bachelors in the relative 'purity' of wilderness conditions. Queer Cowboys recovers this forgotten culture of exclusively masculine, sometimes erotic, and often intimate camaraderie in fiction, photographs, illustrations, song lyrics, historical ephemera, and theatrical performances.

Queering Public Address

Author: Charles E. Morris
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 9781570036644
Size: 64.68 MB
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Ten noted rhetorical critics disrupt the silence regarding nonnormative sexualities in the study of American historical discourse and upend the heteronormativity that governs much of rhetorical history. Reconfiguring Quintilian's mandate that an orator is a good man speaking well, contributors grapple at the intersection of rhetoric, history, and sexuality as they interrogate historically situated discursive performances, politics, and meanings of the good queer speaking well. Enacting both political and radical visions, these scholars articulate the promises of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender public address and the queer critiques that work to deepen their fulfillment. The contributors consider figures such as Abraham Lincoln, Eleanor Roosevelt, Harvey Milk, Marlon Riggs, and Lorraine Hansberry.

Queering Gothic In The Romantic Age

Author: M. Fincher
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230223176
Size: 31.94 MB
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This book argues that Gothic writing of the Romantic period is queer. Using a variety of texts, it argues that contemporary queer theory can help us to read the obliqueness and invisibility of same-sex desire in a culture of vigilance. Fincher shows how the Gothic's ambivalent gender politics destabilize heteronormative narratives.

Queer Chivalry

Author: Tison Pugh
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807151866
Size: 39.29 MB
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For the U.S. South, the myth of chivalric masculinity dominates the cultural and historical landscape. Visions of white southern men as archetypes of honor and gentility run throughout regional narratives with little regard for the actions and, at times, the atrocities committed by such men. In Queer Chivalry, Tison Pugh exposes the inherent contradictions in these depictions of cavalier manhood, investigating the foundations of southern gallantry as a reincarnated and reauthorized version of medieval masculinity. Pugh argues that the idea of masculinity -- particularly as seen in works by prominent southern authors from Mark Twain to Ellen Gilchrist -- constitutes a cultural myth that queerly demarcates accepted norms of manliness, often by displaying the impossibility of its achievement. Beginning with Twain's famous critique of "the Sir Walter disease" that pilloried the South, Pugh focuses on authors who questioned the code of chivalry by creating protagonists whose quests for personal knighthood prove quixotic. Through detailed readings of major works -- including Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Flannery O'Connor's short fiction, John Kennedy Toole's A Confederacy of Dunces, Robert Penn Warren's A Place to Come To, Walker Percy's novels, and Gilchrist's The Annunciation -- Pugh demonstrates that the hypermasculinity of white-knight ideals only draws attention to the ambiguous gender of the literary southern male. Employing insights from gender and psychoanalytic theory, Queer Chivalry contributes to recent critical discussions of the cloaked anxieties about gender and sexuality in southern literature. Ultimately, Pugh uncovers queer limits in the cavalier mythos, showing how facts and fictions contributed to the ideological formulation of the South.

Bodies And Things In Nineteenth Century Literature And Culture

Author: Katharina Boehm
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 1137136111
Size: 69.15 MB
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In the nineteenth century, the relationship between the human body and the object world was redefined by momentous social, cultural, and scientific changes. This book traces the emergence of an exciting range of ideas about materiality, phenomenological experience, and the realm of objects in nineteenth-century literature and culture. The book features contributions by leading specialists in the field as well as the work of younger colleagues. The collection sheds new light on the porous boundaries, affinities, and frictions between bodies and things in the nineteenth-century imagination by drawing on the insights of gender studies, postcolonial studies, the history of science, and performance studies. The contributors explore canonical nineteenth-century works by Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, and Henry James, alongside less-familiar texts, such as travelogues, cartoons and scientific treatises, and a wide range of objects including nineteenth-century automata, scrapbooks, museum exhibits and antiques.

Cow Boys And Cattle Men

Author: Jacqueline M. Moore
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814757405
Size: 52.21 MB
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Cowboys are an American legend, but despite ubiquity in history and popular culture, misperceptions abound. Technically, a cowboy worked with cattle, as a ranch hand, while his boss, the cattleman, owned the ranch. Jacqueline M. Moore casts aside romantic and one-dimensional images of cowboys by analyzing the class, gender, and labor histories of ranching in Texas during the second half of the nineteenth century. As working-class men, cowboys showed their masculinity through their skills at work as well as public displays in town. But what cowboys thought was manly behavior did not always match those ideas of the business-minded cattlemen, who largely absorbed middle-class masculine ideals of restraint. Real men, by these standards, had self-mastery over their impulses and didn’t fight, drink, gamble or consort with "unsavory" women. Moore explores how, in contrast to the mythic image, from the late 1870s on, as the Texas frontier became more settled and the open range disappeared, the real cowboys faced increasing demands from the people around them to rein in the very traits that Americans considered the most masculine. Published in Cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University.

Affectionate Men

Author: Russell Bush
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312242855
Size: 43.31 MB
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Dozens of period photographs--including daguerreotypes, tintypes, cabinet cards, and more--celebrate the affectionate relationships and friendships between men, both gay and straight, from the earliest days of photography through the 1950s. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.

Wyatt Earp A Vigilante Life

Author: Andrew C. Isenberg
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1429945478
Size: 22.79 MB
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Finalist for the 2014 Weber-Clements Book Prize for the Best Non-fiction Book on Southwestern America In popular culture, Wyatt Earp is the hero of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona, and a beacon of rough cowboy justice in the tumultuous American West. The subject of dozens of films, he has been invoked in battles against organized crime (in the 1930s), communism (in the 1950s), and al-Qaeda (after 2001). Yet as the historian Andrew C. Isenberg reveals in Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life, the Hollywood Earp is largely a fiction—one created by none other than Earp himself. The lawman played on-screen by Henry Fonda and Burt Lancaster is stubbornly duty-bound; in actuality, Earp led a life of impulsive lawbreaking and shifting identities. When he wasn't wearing a badge, he was variously a thief, a brothel bouncer, a gambler, and a confidence man. As Isenberg writes, "He donned and shucked off roles readily, whipsawing between lawman and lawbreaker, and pursued his changing ambitions recklessly, with little thought to the cost to himself, and still less thought to the cost, even the deadly cost, to others." By 1900, Earp's misdeeds had caught up with him: his involvement as a referee in a fixed heavyweight prizefight brought him national notoriety as a scoundrel. Stung by the press, Earp set out to rebuild his reputation. He spent his last decades in Los Angeles, where he befriended Western silent film actors and directors. Having tried and failed over the course of his life to invent a better future for himself, in the end he invented a better past. Isenberg argues that even though Earp, who died in 1929, did not live to see it, Hollywood's embrace of him as a paragon of law and order was his greatest confidence game of all. A searching account of the man and his enduring legend, and a book about our national fascination with extrajudicial violence, Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life is a resounding biography of a singular American figure.

The Queer Composition Of America S Sound

Author: Nadine Hubbs
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520937956
Size: 33.98 MB
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In this vibrant and pioneering book, Nadine Hubbs shows how a gifted group of Manhattan-based gay composers were pivotal in creating a distinctive "American sound" and in the process served as architects of modern American identity. Focusing on a talented circle that included Aaron Copland, Virgil Thomson, Leonard Bernstein, Marc Blitzstein, Paul Bowles, David Diamond, and Ned Rorem, The Queer Composition of America's Sound homes in on the role of these artists' self-identification—especially with tonal music, French culture, and homosexuality—in the creation of a musical idiom that even today signifies "America" in commercials, movies, radio and television, and the concert hall.

On Brokeback Mountain

Author: Eric Patterson
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780739121658
Size: 76.44 MB
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On Brokeback Mountain provides accessible, close, and comparative readings of the story and the film, discussing them in relation to the social history of sexual minority men in America. By analyzing the literary and artistic traditions of the homoerotic pastoral, the popular tradition of the Western, and the tradition of the tragic romantic love story, the book explores the American cultural construction of masculinity, friendship, and sexual relationships between men, and the sources and effects of homophobia.