Psycholinguistic Implications For Linguistic Relativity

Author: Rumjahn Hoosain
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1134763778
Size: 34.57 MB
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Rather than offering variations in "world view" as evidence for linguistic relativity, this book views language related differences in terms of the facility with which information is processed. Distinctive perceptual, memory, and neurolinguistic aspects of the Chinese language are discussed, as is the cognitive style of the Chinese people. Chinese orthography and other features of morphology and syntax are examined in relation to both bottom-up and top-down cognitive processes. While providing an extensive review of the experimental literature published in English on the Chinese language, this volume also offers a significant sample of the literature originally published in Chinese.

Cognitive Neuroscience Studies Of The Chinese Language

Author: Henry S.R. Kao 高尚仁
Publisher: Hong Kong University Press
ISBN: 9789622095687
Size: 49.12 MB
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What are the linguistic constituents and structural components of Chinese characters and words? Does the spoken language provide a basis for reading different writing systems, including Chinese? How do the results of current neuroimaging and electrophysio

Reading Development And Difficulties In Monolingual And Bilingual Chinese Children

Author: Xi Chen
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400773803
Size: 13.33 MB
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This volume explores Chinese reading development, focusing on children in Chinese societies and bilingual Chinese-speaking children in Western societies. The book is structured around four themes: psycholinguistic study of reading, reading disability, bilingual and biliteracy development, and Chinese children’s literature. It discusses issues that are pertinent to improving language and literacy development, and complex cognitive, linguistic, and socio-cultural factors that underlie language and literacy development. In addition, the book identifies instructional practices that can enhance literacy development and academic achievement. This volume offers an integrative framework of Chinese reading, and deepens our understanding of the intricate processes that underlie Chinese children’s literacy development. It promotes research in reading Chinese and celebrates the distinguished and longstanding career of Richard C. Anderson.

Cognitive Processing Of The Chinese And The Japanese Languages

Author: C.K. Leong
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780792354796
Size: 42.70 MB
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The area of cognitive processing of Chinese and Japanese is currently attracting a great deal of attention by leading cognitive psychologists. They aim to find out the similarities and differences in processing the morphosyllabic Chinese and Japanese syllabary as compared with alphabetic language systems. Topics under the processing of Chinese include: the use of phonological codes in visual identification of Chinese words, the constraint on such phonological activation, recognition of Chinese homophones, Chinese sentence comprehension and children's errors in writing Chinese characters. Topics under the processing of Japanese include: the automatic recognition of kanji within an interactive-activation framework, On-reading and Kun-reading of kanji characters, processing differences between hiragana and kanji, the effect of polysemy on katakana script, and the writing behavior of Japanese and non-Japanese speakers. The interactive-activation model provides the phonologic-orthographic links in processing both language systems. The present volume should add greatly to our understanding of this topic. Many of the contributors are internationally known for their experimental psychological work.

Language Processing In Chinese

Author: Hsuan Chih Chen
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 9780080867441
Size: 59.24 MB
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The aim of this book is to integrate the most recent research in the cognitive aspects of the Chinese language into a single academic reference for those interested in language processing and related fields. Chinese is perhaps the most widely used language in the world. In addition to its popularity, many specific features make it unique in relation to many Indo-European languages. Chinese words generally do not have inflections indicating grammatical attributes such as number, gender and case for nouns, or tense and aspect for verbs. Chinese words have no inherently marked lexical categories. Unlike the alphabetic symbols common to Indo-European languages, the Chinese writing system is logographic in nature. Chinese script/speech relationship is highly opaque, with the Chinese characters representing lexical morphemes in contrast to alphabetic symbols which represent phonemes. This volume presents research findings indispensable to the general understanding of human language processing about how people process the Chinese language.

Reading Chinese Script

Author: Jian Wang
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1135687498
Size: 43.68 MB
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This volume uses unique properties of Chinese script to focus on morphological analyses during the character and word recognition process, though some of the reported work also pertains to the use of phonological information. In addition, this volume contains work on syntactic and pragmatic processes during sentence reading and three chapters that examine on-line processes. A comprehensive appraisal of cognitive processes during the reading of Chinese script that includes studies conducted by leading researchers from within and outside the mainland, this volume will be of interest to all those studying reading and visual symbol processing.

Dyslexia Advances In Theory And Practice

Author: Per Sundberg
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401146675
Size: 54.46 MB
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A balanced view of recent research on reading disability is presented by leading international scholars representing various subdisciplines of psychology and allied sciences. The volume provides researchers, graduate students, educators and other professionals with up-dated and practical useful knowledge of and insights into the latest theories and findings of the nature and causes of reading disability. Rational guidelines for assessment, prevention and intervention are also provided, based on such concepts as phonological and orthographical processing, automaticity and metacognition. Several chapters are written without technical terminology, yet with scientific rigor, and should be readable by a wide audience.

The Oxford Handbook Of Chinese Psychology

Author: Michael Harris Bond
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 019954185X
Size: 19.70 MB
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The Oxford Handbook of Chinese psychology is the first book of its kind - a comprehensive and commanding review of Chinese psychology, covering areas of human functioning with unparalleled sophistication and complexity. In 42 chapters, leading authorities cite and integrate both English and Chinese-language research in topic areas ranging from the socialization of children, mathematics achievement, emotion, bilingualism and Chinese styles of thinking to Chineseidentity, personal relationships, leadership processes and psychopathology. With all chapters accessibly written by the leading researchers in their respective fields, the reader of this volume will learn how and why China has developed in the way it has, and how it is likely to develop. In addition,the book shows how a better understanding of a culture so different to our own can tell us so much about our own culture and sense of identity.

At The Doors Of Lexical Access The Importance Of The First 250 Milliseconds In Reading

Author: Jon Andoni Dunabeitia
Publisher: Frontiers E-books
ISBN: 2889192601
Size: 15.51 MB
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Correct word identification and processing is a prerequisite for accurate reading, and decades of psycholinguistic and neuroscientific research have shown that the magical moments of visual word recognition are short-lived and markedly fast. The time window in which a given letter string passes from being a mere sequence of printed curves and strokes to acquiring the word status takes around one third of a second. In a few hundred milliseconds, a skilled reader recognizes an isolated word and carries out a number of underlying processes, such as the encoding of letter position and letter identity, and lexico-semantic information retrieval. However, the precise manner (and order) in which these processes occur (or co-occur) is a matter of contention subject to empirical research. There’s no agreement regarding the precise timing of some of the essential processes that guide visual word processing, such as precise letter identification, letter position assignment or sub-word unit processing (bigrams, trigrams, syllables, morphemes), among others. Which is the sequence of processes that lead to lexical access? How do these and other processes interact with each other during the early moments of word processing? Do these processes occur in a serial fashion or do they take place in parallel? Are these processes subject to mutual interaction principles? Is feedback allowed for within the earliest stages of word identification? And ultimately, when does the reader’s brain effectively identify a given word? A vast number of questions remain open, and this Research Topic will cover some of them, giving the readership the opportunity to understand how the scientific community faces the problem of modeling the early stages of word identification according to the latest neuroscientific findings. The present Research Topic aimed to combine recent experimental evidence on early word processing from different techniques together with comprehensive reviews of the current work directions, in order to create a landmark forum in which experts in the field defined the state of the art and future directions. We were willing to receive submissions of empirical as well as theoretical and review articles based on different computational and neuroscience-oriented methodologies. We especially encouraged researchers primarily using electrophysiological or magnetoencephalographic techniques as well as eye-tracking to participate, given that these techniques provide us with the opportunity to uncover the mysteries of lexical access allowing for a fine-grained time-course analysis. The main focus of interest concerned the processes that are held within the initial 250-300 milliseconds after word presentation, covering areas that link basic visuo-attentional systems with linguistic mechanisms.