Political Islam Citizenship And Minorities

Author: Andrea Zaki Stephanous
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 076185214X
Size: 13.76 MB
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This book discusses the relationship between religion and politics in the Middle East and the future of political Christianity. The emergence of political Islam and the recent changes in political Christianity in the region have both contributed to a new perception of the role of Arab Christians.

Secular Nationalism And Citizenship In Muslim Countries

Author: Kail C. Ellis
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319712047
Size: 52.57 MB
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This edited volume examines the importance and significance of the Christian population in the Middle East and North Africa from the rise of Islam to present day. Specifically, the authors focus on the contributions of Christians to Arab politics, economy, and law. Using the current plight of Christians in the Muslim world (Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, and Egypt), the contributors analyze the origins of the crises and propose recommendations and strategies to foster religious freedom, human rights, and an inclusive political system that ensures equality of citizenship for all communities to participate fully in their societies.

Eastern Christianity And Politics In The Twenty First Century

Author: Lucian N. Leustean
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317818660
Size: 13.82 MB
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This book provides an up-to-date, comprehensive overview of Eastern Christian churches in Europe, the Middle East, America, Africa, Asia and Australia. Written by leading international scholars in the field, it examines both Orthodox and Oriental churches from the end of the Cold War up to the present day. The book offers a unique insight into the myriad church-state relations in Eastern Christianity and tackles contemporary concerns, opportunities and challenges, such as religious revival after the fall of communism; churches and democracy; relations between Orthodox, Catholic and Greek Catholic churches; religious education and monastic life; the size and structure of congregations; and the impact of migration, secularisation and globalisation on Eastern Christianity in the twenty-first century.

Christians In Egypt

Author: Andrea B. Rugh
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137566132
Size: 58.22 MB
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Christians in the Middle East have come under increasing pressure in recent years with the rise of radical Islam. In Egypt, the large Coptic Christian community has traditionally played an important political and historical role. This book examines Egyptian Christians' responses to sectarian pressures in both national and local contexts.

Christian Communities In The Arab Middle East

Author: Andrea Pacini
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN:
Size: 39.85 MB
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Existing before the Muslim conquest of the Middle East, and integrated into the Islamic political order, which for centuries has given full rights only to Muslims, the various Eastern Christian communities have represented an important element of pluralism within Middle Eastern Arab societies. The end of the twentieth century, however, marks a crucial period for the the Christian communities, who have witnessed their base decline from 24% of the general population in 1914 to a mere 7%.The rising tide of Christian emigration is just one of the most obvious signs of the communities growing unrest. Beginning with an examination of the role played by Eastern Christians in the history of Arab society, this ground-breaking study presents a comprehensive and detailed analysis of the many challenges facing the Christian communities today. Focusing on juridical status, social, political and economic dynamics, and relationships with the the Muslim majority culture, this intriguing study highlights the various political and cultural strategies employed by Eastern Christians as they attempt to guarantee their role and status as equal citizens in their own Arab states.

The Arab Christian

Author: Kenneth Cragg
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press
ISBN: 9780664221829
Size: 38.78 MB
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Centuries before the existence of the Islamic faith, there were Arabs who could be described as Christian. And there has been a Christian Arabism, an Arab Christianity, since Muhammad's day. Arab Christianity has survived Muslin dominance, and this enlightening book takes an in-depth look at its survival.

Conflict Cooperation

Author: Peter E. Makari
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
ISBN: 9780815631446
Size: 56.89 MB
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"Egypt is considered the intellectual birthplace of the modern Islamic movements and is a center of contemporary Islamic thought and culture. It is also home to one of the oldest Christian populations in the world. In this book, Peter Makari considers the role of governmental and nongovernmental actors in conflict resolution and the promotion of positive Christian-Muslim relations in Egypt. He maintains that, prevailing opinions notwithstanding, the last quarter-century has witnessed a high level of interreligious cooperation and tolerance. Relying heavily on Arabic sources, Makari examines the rhetoric and actions of official governmental and religious institutions, as well as civil society actors. Combining empirical research with an informed theoretical perspective, this work offers a perspective seldom available to the English reader on questions of tolerance, citizenship, and civil society in this part of the Arab world"--Publisher's description.

The Arab Shi A

Author: Graham E. Fuller
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312239565
Size: 38.26 MB
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This is the first book on the Arab Shi’a community, a group whose identity and relations to the rest of the Middle East cut to the heart of politics and society in the Arab and Muslim world.

Islam And The Arab Awakening

Author: Tariq Ramadan
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019997702X
Size: 43.80 MB
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One of the most important developments in the modern history of the Middle East, the so-called Arab Spring began in Tunisia in December 2010, bringing down dictators, sparking a civil war in Libya, and igniting a bloody uprising in Syria. Its long-term repercussions in Egypt and elsewhere remain unclear. Now one of the world's leading Islamic thinkers examines and explains it, in this searching, provocative, and necessary book. Time Magazine named Tariq Ramadan one of the most important innovators of the twenty-first century. A Muslim intellectual and prolific author, he has won global renown for his reflections on Islam and the contemporary challenges in both the Muslim majority societies and the West. In Islam and the Arab Awakening, he explores the uprisings, offering rare insight into their origin, significance, and possible futures. As early as 2003, he writes, there had been talk of democratization in the Middle East and North Africa. The U.S. government and private organizations set up networks and provided training for young leaders, especially in the use of the Internet and social media, and the West abandoned its unconditional support of authoritarian governments. But the West did not create the uprisings. Indeed, one lesson Ramadan presents is that these mass movements and their consequences cannot be totally controlled. Something irreversible has taken place: dictators have been overthrown without weapons. But, he writes, democratic processes are only beginning to emerge, and unanswered questions remain. What role will religion play? How should Islamic principles and goals be rethought? Can a sterile, polarizing debate between Islamism and secularism be avoided? Avoiding both naive confidence and conspiratorial paranoia, Ramadan voices a tentative optimism. If a true civil society can be established, he argues, this moment's fragile hope will live.

Heirs To Forgotten Kingdoms

Author: Gerard Russell
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1471114724
Size: 76.91 MB
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Despite its reputation for religious intolerance, the Middle East has long sheltered many distinctive and strange faiths: one regards the Greek prophets as incarnations of God, another reveres Lucifer in the form of a peacock, and yet another believes that their followers are reincarnated beings who have existed in various forms for thousands of years. These religions represent the last vestiges of the magnificent civilizations in ancient history: Persia, Babylon, Egypt in the time of the Pharaohs. Their followers have learned how to survive foreign attacks and the perils of assimilation. But today, with the Middle East in turmoil, they face greater challenges than ever before. In Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms, former diplomat Gerard Russell ventures to the distant, nearly impassable regions where these mysterious religions still cling to survival. He lives alongside the Mandaeans and Ezidis of Iraq, the Zoroastrians of Iran, the Copts of Egypt, and others. He learns their histories, participates in their rituals, and comes to understand the threats to their communities. Historically a tolerant faith, Islam has, since the early 20th century, witnessed the rise of militant, extremist sects. This development, along with the rippling effects of Western invasion, now pose existential threats to these minority faiths. And as more and more of their youth flee to the West in search of greater freedoms and job prospects, these religions face the dire possibility of extinction. Drawing on his extensive travels and archival research, Russell provides an essential record of the past, present, and perilous future of these remarkable religions.