Or Perish In The Attempt

Author: David J. Peck
Publisher: Farcountry Press
ISBN: 9781560372264
Size: 35.34 MB
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Dr. David Peck's Or Perish in the Attempt ingeniously combines the remarkable adventures of Lewis and Clark with the problems of health faced by their expedition. Formidable problems indeed, but the author patiently, expertly, and humorously guides us through the medical travails of the famous journey, juxtaposing treatment then against remedy now. The result is a fascinating book that sheds new light on not only Lewis and Clark and the men they led along an 8,000-mile wilderness path, but the practice of medicine in the world they lived in. - Howard Berk, on back cover.

History Of Professional Nursing In The United States

Author: Arlene W. Keeling, PhD, RN, FAAN
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826133134
Size: 29.22 MB
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"The authors demonstrate how U. S. nurses have worked throughout their history to restore patients to health, teach health promotion, and participate in disease preventing activities. Recounting those experiences in the nurses' own words, the authors bring that history to life, capturing nurses' thoughts and feelings during times of war, epidemics, and disasters as well as during their everyday work. The book fills a gap in the secondary literature on...the history of nursing that can be useful in these times of great social change. It is a “must read” for every nurse in the United States!" --Barbra Mann Wall, PhD, RN, FAAN; Director of the Eleanor Crowder Bjoring Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry; University of Virginia; From the Foreword For over four hundred years, a diverse array of nurses, nurses' aides, midwives, and public-minded citizens across the United States have attended to the healthcare of America’s equally diverse populations. Beginning in 1607 when the first Englishmen landed in Virginia, and concluding in 2016 when Flint, Michigan, was declared to be in a state of emergency, this expansive nursing history text for undergraduate and graduate nursing programs examines the history of the nursing profession to better understand how nursing became what it is today. Grounded in the premise that health care can and should be promoted in partnership with communities to provide quality care for all, this history analyzes the resilience and innovation of nurses who provided care for the most underprivileged populations, such as slaves on Southern plantations, immigrants in tenements in Manhattan's Lower East Side, and isolated populations in rural Kentucky. It takes into account issues of race, class, and gender and the influence of these factors on nurses and patients. Featuring nearly 300 photos, oral histories, and case examples from varied settings in the United States and beyond, the narrative discusses major medical advances, prominent leaders and grassroots movements in nursing, and ethical dilemmas that nurses faced with each change in the profession. Chapters include discussion questions for class sessions as well as a list of suggested readings. Key Features: Examines the history of nursing during the last four centuries Links challenges for nurses in the past to those of present-day nurses Includes oral histories, case examples, boxed highlights, call-outs, discussion questions, archival sites, and references Covers drugs, technological innovations, and scientific discovery in each era Demonstrates progression toward “A Culture of Health” as described by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Lewis Clark

Author: Bruce C. Paton
Publisher: Fulcrum Pub
ISBN:
Size: 62.73 MB
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Examines early nineteenth-century medical standards and techniques and discusses how they were applied to Lewis and Clark's 1803 expedition to open the American West.

The Lewis And Clark Journals

Author: Meriwether Lewis
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803280397
Size: 69.49 MB
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The diaries and personal accounts of William Clark, Meriwether Lewis, and other members of their expedition chronicle their epic journey across North America in search of a river passage to the Pacific Ocean and describe their encounters with the Native American peoples of the West, exotic flora and fauna, and amazing natural wonders.

Frozen In Time

Author: Owen Beattie
Publisher: Greystone Books
ISBN: 1771640804
Size: 28.42 MB
Format: PDF
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The truth about what happened on Sir John Franklin’s ill-fated Arctic expedition of 1845–48 has been shrouded in mystery for 165 years. Carrying the best equipment that the science and technology, Franklin and his men set out to “penetrate the icy fastness of the north, and to circumnavigate America.” The expedition’s two ships — HMS Erebus and HMS Terror — carrying 129 officers and men, disappeared without a trace. From 1846 to 1880 more than 20 major rescue parties were involved in the search for the missing men and ships. The disappearance of the expedition and absence of any substantial written accounts of the journey have left attempts at a reconstruction of events sketchy and inconclusive. In Frozen in Time, forensic anthropologist Owen Beattie and historian John Geiger tell the dramatic story of the excavation of three sailors from the Franklin Expeditions, buried for 138 years on the lonely headland of Beechey Island. This book contains the astonishing photographic record of the excavation, together with the maps and illustrations that accompany this riveting account of Franklin’s fatal adventure. The unfolding of Dr. Beattie’s unexpected findings is not only a significant document but also, in itself, a tale of high adventure.

Island Of The Blue Foxes

Author: Stephen R. Bown
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 0306825201
Size: 37.56 MB
Format: PDF
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The story of the world's largest, longest, and best financed scientific expedition of all time, triumphantly successful, gruesomely tragic, and never before fully told The immense 18th-century scientific journey, variously known as the Second Kamchatka Expedition or the Great Northern Expedition, from St. Petersburg across Siberia to the coast of North America, involved over 3,000 people and cost Peter the Great over one-sixth of his empire's annual revenue. Until now recorded only in academic works, this 10-year venture, led by the legendary Danish captain Vitus Bering and including scientists, artists, mariners, soldiers, and laborers, discovered Alaska, opened the Pacific fur trade, and led to fame, shipwreck, and "one of the most tragic and ghastly trials of suffering in the annals of maritime and arctic history."

Lewis And Clark Among The Indians Bicentennial Edition

Author: James P. Ronda
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803290195
Size: 52.59 MB
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Particularly valuable for Ronda's inclusion of pertinent background information about the various tribes and for his ethnological analysis. An appendix also places the Sacagawea myth in its proper perspective. Gracefully written, the book bridges the gap between academic and general audiences.OCo"Choice""

The River Of Doubt

Author: Candice Millard
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 9780307575081
Size: 73.59 MB
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At once an incredible adventure narrative and a penetrating biographical portrait, The River of Doubt is the true story of Theodore Roosevelt’s harrowing exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth. The River of Doubt—it is a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped, rapids-choked tributary of the Amazon. Together with his son Kermit and Brazil’s most famous explorer, Cândido Mariano da Silva Rondon, Roosevelt accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it. In the process, he changed the map of the western hemisphere forever. Along the way, Roosevelt and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. The River of Doubt brings alive these extraordinary events in a powerful nonfiction narrative thriller that happens to feature one of the most famous Americans who ever lived. From the soaring beauty of the Amazon rain forest to the darkest night of Theodore Roosevelt’s life, here is Candice Millard’s dazzling debut. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Undocumented

Author: Dan-el Padilla Peralta
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 069819568X
Size: 10.67 MB
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An undocumented immigrant’s journey from a New York City homeless shelter to the top of his Princeton class Dan-el Padilla Peralta has lived the American dream. As a boy, he came here legally with his family. Together they left Santo Domingo behind, but life in New York City was harder than they imagined. Their visas lapsed, and Dan-el’s father returned home. But Dan-el’s courageous mother was determined to make a better life for her bright sons. Without papers, she faced tremendous obstacles. While Dan-el was only in grade school, the family joined the ranks of the city’s homeless. Dan-el, his mother, and brother lived in a downtown shelter where Dan-el’s only refuge was the meager library. There he met Jeff, a young volunteer from a wealthy family. Jeff was immediately struck by Dan-el’s passion for books and learning. With Jeff’s help, Dan-el was accepted on scholarship to Collegiate, the oldest private school in the country. There, Dan-el thrived. Throughout his youth, Dan-el navigated these two worlds: the rough streets of East Harlem, where he lived with his brother and his mother and tried to make friends, and the ultra-elite halls of a Manhattan private school, where he could immerse himself in a world of books and where he soon rose to the top of his class. From Collegiate, Dan-el went to Princeton, where he thrived, and where he made the momentous decision to come out as an undocumented student in a Wall Street Journal profile a few months before he gave the salutatorian’s traditional address in Latin at his commencement. Undocumented is a classic story of the triumph of the human spirit. It also is the perfect cri de coeur for the debate on comprehensive immigration reform. Praise for Undocumented “Dan-el Padilla Peralta’s story is as compulsively readable as a novel, an all-American tall tale that just happens to be true. From homeless shelter to Princeton, Oxford, and Stanford, through the grace not only of his own hard work but his mother’s discipline and care, he documents the America we should still aspire to be.” —Dr. Anne-Marie Slaughter, President of the New America Foundation

Lewis And Clark On The Great Plains

Author:
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803276185
Size: 33.80 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A beautifully rendered reference guide to the Great Plains portion of the famous expedition through the American West highlights the explorer's remarkable encounters with previously undocumented flora and fauna as they moved through the Plains region. Original. (Biology & Natural History)