Number Theory In Mathematics Education

Author: Rina Zazkis
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136501436
Size: 74.87 MB
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This book offers multiple interconnected perspectives on the largely untapped potential of elementary number theory for mathematics education: its formal and cognitive nature, its relation to arithmetic and algebra, its accessibility, its utility and intrinsic merits, to name just a few. Its purpose is to promote explication and critical dialogue about these issues within the international mathematics education community. The studies comprise a variety of pedagogical and research orientations by an international group of researchers that, collectively, make a compelling case for the relevance and importance of number theory in mathematics education in both pre K-16 settings and mathematics teacher education. Topics variously engaged include: *understanding particular concepts related to numerical structure and number theory; *elaborating on the historical and psychological relevance of number theory in concept development; *attaining a smooth transition and extension from pattern recognition to formative principles; *appreciating the aesthetics of number structure; *exploring its suitability in terms of making connections leading to aha! insights and reaching toward the learner's affective domain; *reexamining previously constructed knowledge from a novel angle; *investigating connections between technique and theory; *utilizing computers and calculators as pedagogical tools; and *generally illuminating the role number theory concepts could play in developing mathematical knowledge and reasoning in students and teachers. Overall, the chapters of this book highlight number theory-related topics as a stepping-stone from arithmetic toward generalization and algebraic formalism, and as a means for providing intuitively grounded meanings of numbers, variables, functions, and proofs. Number Theory in Mathematics Education: Perspectives and Prospects is of interest to researchers, teacher educators, and students in the field of mathematics education, and is well suited as a text for upper-level mathematics education courses.

The Mathematics That Every Secondary School Math Teacher Needs To Know

Author: Alan Sultan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135157820
Size: 66.15 MB
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What knowledge of mathematics do secondary school math teachers need to facilitate understanding, competency, and interest in mathematics for all of their students? This unique text and resource bridges the gap between the mathematics learned in college and the mathematics taught in secondary schools. Written in an informal, clear, and interactive learner-centered style, it is designed to help pre-service and in-service teachers gain the deep mathematical insight they need to engage their students in learning mathematics in a multifaceted way that is interesting, developmental, connected, deep, understandable, and often, surprising and entertaining. Features include Launch questions at the beginning of each section, Student Learning Opportunities, Questions from the Classroom, and highlighted themes throughout to aid readers in becoming teachers who have great "MATH-N-SIGHT": M Multiple Approaches/Representations A Applications to Real Life T Technology H History N Nature of Mathematics: Reasoning and Proof S Solving Problems I Interlinking Concepts: Connections G Grade Levels H Honing of Mathematical Skills T Typical Errors This text is aligned with the recently released Common Core State Standards, and is ideally suited for a capstone mathematics course in a secondary mathematics certification program. It is also appropriate for any methods or mathematics course for pre- or in-service secondary mathematics teachers, and is a valuable resource for classroom teachers.

Early Childhood Mathematics Education Research

Author: Julie Sarama
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135592497
Size: 35.10 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This important new book synthesizes relevant research on the learning of mathematics from birth into the primary grades from the full range of these complementary perspectives. At the core of early math experts Julie Sarama and Douglas Clements's theoretical and empirical frameworks are learning trajectories—detailed descriptions of children’s thinking as they learn to achieve specific goals in a mathematical domain, alongside a related set of instructional tasks designed to engender those mental processes and move children through a developmental progression of levels of thinking. Rooted in basic issues of thinking, learning, and teaching, this groundbreaking body of research illuminates foundational topics on the learning of mathematics with practical and theoretical implications for all ages. Those implications are especially important in addressing equity concerns, as understanding the level of thinking of the class and the individuals within it, is key in serving the needs of all children.

Learning Through Teaching Mathematics

Author: Roza Leikin
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789048139903
Size: 67.53 MB
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The idea of teachers Learning through Teaching (LTT) – when presented to a naïve bystander – appears as an oxymoron. Are we not supposed to learn before we teach? After all, under the usual circumstances, learning is the task for those who are being taught, not of those who teach. However, this book is about the learning of teachers, not the learning of students. It is an ancient wisdom that the best way to “truly learn” something is to teach it to others. Nevertheless, once a teacher has taught a particular topic or concept and, consequently, “truly learned” it, what is left for this teacher to learn? As evident in this book, the experience of teaching presents teachers with an exciting opp- tunity for learning throughout their entire career. This means acquiring a “better” understanding of what is being taught, and, moreover, learning a variety of new things. What these new things may be and how they are learned is addressed in the collection of chapters in this volume. LTT is acknowledged by multiple researchers and mathematics educators. In the rst chapter, Leikin and Zazkis review literature that recognizes this phenomenon and stress that only a small number of studies attend systematically to LTT p- cesses. The authors in this volume purposefully analyze the teaching of mathematics as a source for teachers’ own learning.

Culturally Responsive Mathematics Education

Author: Brian Greer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135593345
Size: 15.39 MB
Format: PDF
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At a time of rapid demographic change and amidst the many educational challenges facing the US, this critical new collection presents mathematics education from a culturally responsive perspective. It tackles the most crucial issues of teaching mathematics to an ethnically diverse school population, including the political dimension of mathematics education within the context of governmental efforts to improve achievement in school mathematics. Culturally Responsive Mathematics Education moves beyond a point of view that is internal to mathematics education as a discipline, and instead offers a broad perspective of mathematics as a significant, liberating intellectual force in our society. The editors of this volume bring together contributions from many of the leading teachers, teacher educators, researchers, scholars, and activists who have been working to reorient mathematics education in ways that reflect mathematics education as accomplished, first and foremost, through human interactions.

Algebra In The Early Grades

Author: James J. Kaput
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351577085
Size: 63.41 MB
Format: PDF
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This volume is the first to offer a comprehensive, research-based, multi-faceted look at issues in early algebra. In recent years, the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics has recommended that algebra become a strand flowing throughout the K-12 curriculum, and the 2003 RAND Mathematics Study Panel has recommended that algebra be “the initial topical choice for focused and coordinated research and development [in K-12 mathematics].” This book provides a rationale for a stronger and more sustained approach to algebra in school, as well as concrete examples of how algebraic reasoning may be developed in the early grades. It is organized around three themes: The Nature of Early Algebra Students’ Capacity for Algebraic Thinking Issues of Implementation: Taking Early Algebra to the Classrooms. The contributors to this landmark volume have been at the forefront of an effort to integrate algebra into the existing early grades mathematics curriculum. They include scholars who have been developing the conceptual foundations for such changes as well as researchers and developers who have led empirical investigations in school settings. Algebra in the Early Grades aims to bridge the worlds of research, practice, design, and theory for educators, researchers, students, policy makers, and curriculum developers in mathematics education.

Understanding Emotions In Mathematical Thinking And Learning

Author: Ulises Xolocotzin
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 0128024895
Size: 60.63 MB
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Emotions play a critical role in mathematical cognition and learning. Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning offers a multidisciplinary approach to the role of emotions in numerical cognition, mathematics education, learning sciences, and affective sciences. It addresses ways in which emotions relate to cognitive processes involved in learning and doing mathematics, including processing of numerical and physical magnitudes (e.g. time and space), performance in arithmetic and algebra, problem solving and reasoning attitudes, learning technologies, and mathematics achievement. Additionally, it covers social and affective issues such as identity and attitudes toward mathematics. Covers methodologies in studying emotion in mathematical knowledge Reflects the diverse and innovative nature of the methodological approaches and theoretical frameworks proposed by current investigations of emotions and mathematical cognition Includes perspectives from cognitive experimental psychology, neuroscience, and from sociocultural, semiotic, and discursive approaches Explores the role of anxiety in mathematical learning Synthesizes unifies the work of multiple sub-disciplines in one place

Mathematics Teacher Noticing

Author: Miriam Sherin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136838260
Size: 72.99 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Mathematics Teacher Noticing is the first book to examine research on the particular type of noticing done by teachers---how teachers pay attention to and make sense of what happens in the complexity of instructional situations. In the midst of all that is happening in a classroom, where do mathematics teachers look, what do they see, and what sense do they make of it? This groundbreaking collection begins with an overview of the construct of noticing and the various historical, theoretical, and methodological perspectives on teacher noticing. It then focuses on studies of mathematics teacher noticing in the context of teaching and learning and concludes by suggesting links to other constructs integral to teaching. By collecting the work of leaders in the field in one volume, the editors present the current state of research and provide ideas for how future work could further the field.

Multiple Perspectives On Mathematics Teaching And Learning

Author: Jo Boaler
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9781567505344
Size: 54.48 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Authors analyze mathematics education from a range of perspectives. They address such practical problems as: maximizing the impact of teacher education programmes; increasing learning opportunities for students working in groups; and the impact of male domination in mixed classrooms.