North By 2020

Author: Amy Lauren Lovecraft
Publisher: University of Alaska Press
ISBN: 1602231435
Size: 41.32 MB
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Originating from a series of workshops held at the Alaska Forum of the Fourth International Polar Year, this interdisciplinary volume addresses a host of current concerns regarding the ecology and rapid transformation of the arctic. Concentrating on the most important linked social-ecological systems, including fresh water, marine resources, and oil and gas development, this volume explores opportunities for sustainable development from a variety of perspectives, among them social sciences, natural and applied sciences, and the arts. Individual chapters highlight expressions of climate change in dance, music, and film, as well as from an indigenous knowledge–based perspective.

Anthropology And Climate Change

Author: Susan A. Crate
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315530317
Size: 38.14 MB
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The first edition of Anthropology and Climate Change (2009) pioneered the study of climate change through the lens of anthropology, covering the relation between human cultures and the environment from prehistoric times to the present. This second, heavily revised edition brings the material on this rapidly changing field completely up to date, with major scholars from around the world mapping out trajectories of research and issuing specific calls for action. The new edition introduces new “foundational” chapters—laying out what anthropologists know about climate change today, new theoretical and practical perspectives, insights gleaned from sociology, and international efforts to study and curb climate change—making the volume a perfect introductory textbook; presents a series of case studies—both new case studies and old ones updated and viewed with fresh eyes—with the specific purpose of assessing climate trends; provides a close look at how climate change is affecting livelihoods, especially in the context of economic globalization and the migration of youth from rural to urban areas; expands coverage to England, the Amazon, the Marshall Islands, Tanzania, and Ethiopia; re-examines the conclusions and recommendations of the first volume, refining our knowledge of what we do and do not know about climate change and what we can do to adapt.

Oceans And Marine Resources In A Changing Climate

Author: Roger Griffis
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610914805
Size: 80.86 MB
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Prepared for the 2013 National Climate Assessment and a landmark study in terms of its breadth and depth of coverage, Oceans and Marine Resources in a Changing Climate is the result of a collaboration among numerous local, state, federal, and nongovernmental agencies to develop a comprehensive, state of the art look at the effects of climate change on the oceans and marine ecosystems under U.S. jurisdiction. This book provides an assessment of scientific knowledge of the current and projected impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on the physical, chemical, and biological components and human uses of marine ecosystems under U.S. jurisdiction. It also provides assessment of the international implications for the U.S. due to climate impacts on ocean ecosystems and of efforts to prepare for and adapt to climate and acidification impacts on ocean ecosystem, including · Climate-Driven Physical and Chemical Changes in Marine Ecosystems · Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Organisms · Impacts of Climate Change on Human Uses of the Ocean · International Implications of Climate Change · Ocean Management Challenges, Adaptation Approaches, and Opportunities in a Changing Climate · Sustaining the Assessment of Climate Impacts on Oceans and Marine Resources Rich in science and case studies, it examines the latest climate change impacts, scenarios, vulnerabilities, and adaptive capacity and offers decision makers and stakeholders a substantial basis from which to make informed choices that will affect the well-being of the region’s inhabitants in the decades to come.

Arctic Science International Law And Climate Change

Author: Susanne Wasum-Rainer
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3642242030
Size: 22.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Developments in the Arctic region are increasingly part of international discussion. The book contains a comprehensive and interdisciplinary analysis of the current problems around marine scientific research in the Arctic region. It combines scientific, legal and policy aspects. The main questions addressed are: ongoing and future Arctic marine research, marine research in the Arctic Ocean in practice, the legal framework, enlarged continental shelves and the freedom of marine science and particularities and challenges of the Arctic region. The contributors are leading experts in the field of politics, law and science.

Finding The Arctic

Author: Matthew Sturm
Publisher: University of Alaska Press
ISBN: 1602231648
Size: 78.97 MB
Format: PDF
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The history of the Arctic is rich, filled with fascinating and heroic stories of exploration, multicultural interactions, and humans facing nature at its most extreme. In Finding the Arctic, the accomplished arctic researcher Matthew Sturm collects some of the most memorable and moving of these stories and weaves them around his own story of a 2,500-mile snowmobile expedition across arctic Alaska and Canada. During that trip, Sturm and six companions followed a circuitous route that brought them to many of the most historic spots in the North. They stood in the footsteps of their predecessors, experienced the landscape and the weather, and gained an intimate perspective on notable historical events, all chronicled here by Sturm. Written with humor and pathos, Finding the Arctic is a classic tale of adventure travel. And throughout the book,Sturm, with his thirty-eight years of experience in the North, emerges as an excellent guide for any who wish to understand the Arctic of today and yesterday.

North By Degree

Author: Susan A. Kaplan
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781606189238
Size: 14.59 MB
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North by Degree: New Perspectives on Arctic Exploration is a stimulating volume of papers on the history of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Arctic exploration. The contributors have contextualized expeditions, examining the social, cultural, technological, and environmental settings in which endeavors were conceived and carried out, and how they were described and understood by the public. A conference honoring Robert E. Peary's historic 1908-09 North Pole Expedition and recognizing the third International Polar Year (2007-09) brought together researches from a variety of disciplines whose work touches on different facets of Arctic exploration. Susan A. Kaplan (The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum at Bowdoin College) and Robert McCracken Peck (Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia) invited the Philadelphia Area Center for the History of Science (PACHS) and the American Philosophical Society (APS) to partner with them. "North by Degree: An International Conference on Arctic Exploration" was a result of the collaboration and took place in Philadelphia in May 2008. The papers in this volume are a subset of those presented at the conference and are authored by scholars from many disciplines, including English, art history, anthropology, archaeology, history, ethnohistory, and Native American studies. The papers cast light on aspects of exploration not examined in most biographies of explorers, official expedition narratives, or overviews of the history of Arctic exploration. Susan A. Kaplan is Professor of Anthropology and Director of The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center at Bowdoin College. Robert McCracken Peck is Curator of Art and Artifacts at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University in Philadelphia.

Field Techniques For Sea Ice Research

Author: Hajo Eicken
Publisher: University of Alaska Press
ISBN: 1602231079
Size: 76.51 MB
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As much as one-tenth of the world’s oceans are covered with sea ice, or frozen ocean water, at some point during the annual cycle. Sea ice thus plays an important, often defining, role in the natural environment and the global climate system. This book is a global look at the changes in sea ice and the tools and techniques used to measure and record those changes. The first comprehensive research done on sea-ice field techniques, this volume will be indispensable for the study of northern sea ice and a must-have for scientists in the field of climate change research.

Resilience And The Cultural Landscape

Author: Tobias Plieninger
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139789511
Size: 14.63 MB
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All over the world, efforts are being made to preserve landscapes facing fundamental change as a consequence of widespread agricultural intensification, land abandonment and urbanisation. The 'cultural landscape' and 'resilience' approaches have, until now, largely been viewed as distinct methods for understanding the effects of these dynamics and the ways in which they might be adapted or managed. This book brings together these two perspectives, providing new insights into the social-ecological resilience of cultural landscapes by coming to terms with, and challenging, the concepts of 'driving forces', 'thresholds', 'adaptive cycles' and 'adaptive management'. By linking these research communities, this book develops a new perspective on landscape changes. Based on firm conceptual contributions and rich case studies from Europe, the Americas and Australia, it will appeal to anyone interested in analysing and managing change in human-shaped environments in the context of sustainability.

Petroleum Resources With Emphasis On Offshore Fields

Author: Ove T. Gudmestad
Publisher: WIT Press
ISBN: 1845644786
Size: 76.59 MB
Format: PDF
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"This book on the Petroleum Resources addresses the challenges of transforming hydrocarbons that exist in underground, to valuable products that can be sold and delivered. It is intended for readers who have a professional or student interest in the petroleum industry, and a basic level of prior knowledge in the technical and commercial aspects of the industry. The goal of the book is to increase the reader's general understanding of key work processes in the "upstream" part of the petroleum industry; that is, the part of the industry that locates underground resources and converts them to valuable products."

Entangled

Author: Marilyn Sigman
Publisher: University of Alaska Press
ISBN: 1602233489
Size: 78.72 MB
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Chronicling her quest for wildness and home in Alaska, naturalist Marilyn Sigman writes lyrically about the history of natural abundance and human notions of wealth—from seals to shellfish to sea otters to herring, halibut, and salmon—in Alaska’s iconic Kachemak Bay. Kachemak Bay is a place where people and the living resources they depend on have ebbed and flowed for thousands of years. The forces of the earth are dynamic here: they can change in an instant, shaking the ground beneath your feet or overturning kayaks in a rushing wave. Glaciers have advanced and receded over centuries. The climate, like the ocean, has shifted from warmer to colder and back again in a matter of decades. The ocean food web has been shuffled from bottom to top again and again. In Entangled, Sigman contemplates the patterns of people staying and leaving, of settlement and displacement, nesting her own journey to Kachemak Bay within diasporas of her Jewish ancestors and of ancient peoples from Asia to the southern coast of Alaska. Along the way she weaves in scientific facts about the region as well as the stories told by Alaska’s indigenous peoples. It is a rhapsodic introduction to this stunning region and a siren call to protect the land’s natural resources in the face of a warming, changing world.