Nexus

Author: Jonathan Reed Winkler
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674033906
Size: 41.30 MB
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In an illuminating study that blends diplomatic, military, technology, and business history, Winkler shows how U.S. officials during World War I discovered the enormous value of global communications. In this absorbing history, Winkler sheds light on the early stages of the global infrastructure that helped launch the United States as the predominant power of the century.

Cyber Blockades

Author: Alison Lawlor Russell
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 1626161127
Size: 42.21 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This is the first book to examine cyber blockades, which are large-scale attacks on infrastructure or systems that prevent a state from accessing cyberspace, thus preventing the transmission (ingress/egress) of data. The attack can take place through digital, physical, and/or electromagnetic means, and it can be conducted by another state or a sub-state group. The purpose of this book is to understand how cyber blockades can shut down or otherwise render cyberspace useless for an entire country, and Russell also seeks to understand the implications of cyber blockades for international relations. A cyber blockade can be either a legitimate or illegitimate tool depending on the circumstances. What is certain is that the state on the receiving end faces a serious threat to its political, military, economic, and social stability. The book includes two in-depth case studies of cyber blockades, Estonia in 2007 and Georgia in 2008, both of which suffered cyber attacks from Russia. Russell compares cyber blockades with those in other domains (sea, land, air, and space) and offers recommendations for policymakers and for further academic study.

African American Officers In Liberia

Author: Brian G. Shellum
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 1612349552
Size: 71.87 MB
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"The story of seventeen African American officers who trained, reorganized, and commanded the Liberian Frontier Force to defend Liberia between 1910 and 1942"--

In Spies We Trust

Author: Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191651710
Size: 51.15 MB
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In Spies We Trust reveals the full story of the Anglo-American intelligence relationship - ranging from the deceits of World War I to the mendacities of 9/11 - for the first time. Why did we ever start trusting spies? It all started a hundred years ago. First we put our faith in them to help win wars, then we turned against the bloodshed and expense, and asked our spies instead to deliver peace and security. By the end of World War II, Britain and America were cooperating effectively to that end. At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, the 'special intelligence relationship' contributed to national and international security in what was an Anglo-American century. But from the 1960s this 'special relationship' went into decline. Britain weakened, American attitudes changed, and the fall of the Soviet Union dissolved the fear that bound London and Washington together. A series of intelligence scandals along the way further eroded public confidence. Yet even in these years, the US offered its old intelligence partner a vital gift: congressional attempts to oversee the CIA in the 1970s encouraged subsequent moves towards more open government in Britain and beyond. So which way do we look now? And what are the alternatives to the British-American intelligence relationship that held sway in the West for so much of the twentieth century? Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones shows that there are a number - the most promising of which, astonishingly, remain largely unknown to the Anglophone world.