Neutrality And Neutralism In The Global Cold War

Author: Sandra Bott
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317502698
Size: 72.22 MB
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This book sheds new light on the foreign policies, roles, and positions of neutral states and the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) in the global Cold War. The volume places the neutral states and the NAM in the context of the Cold War and demonstrates the links between the East, the West, and the so-called Third World. In doing so, this collection provides readers an alternative way of exploring the evolution and impact of the Cold War on North-South connections that challenges traditional notions of the post-1945 history of international relations. The various contributions are framed against the backdrop of the evolution of the Cold War international system and the decolonization process in the Southern hemisphere. By juxtaposing the policies of European neutrals and countries of the NAM, this book offers new perspectives on the evolution of the Cold War. With the links between these two groups of countries receiving very little attention in Cold War scholarship, the volume thus offers a window into a hitherto neglected perspective on the Cold War. Via a series of case studies, the chapters here present new viewpoints on the evolution of the global Cold War through the exploration of the ensuing internal and (mainly) external policy choices of these nations. This book will be of much interest to students of Cold War Studies, international history, foreign policy, security studies and IR in general.

Neutrality And Neutralism In The Global Cold War

Author: Sandra Bott
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317502701
Size: 65.69 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2369
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This book sheds new light on the foreign policies, roles, and positions of neutral states and the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) in the global Cold War. The volume places the neutral states and the NAM in the context of the Cold War and demonstrates the links between the East, the West, and the so-called Third World. In doing so, this collection provides readers an alternative way of exploring the evolution and impact of the Cold War on North-South connections that challenges traditional notions of the post-1945 history of international relations. The various contributions are framed against the backdrop of the evolution of the Cold War international system and the decolonization process in the Southern hemisphere. By juxtaposing the policies of European neutrals and countries of the NAM, this book offers new perspectives on the evolution of the Cold War. With the links between these two groups of countries receiving very little attention in Cold War scholarship, the volume thus offers a window into a hitherto neglected perspective on the Cold War. Via a series of case studies, the chapters here present new viewpoints on the evolution of the global Cold War through the exploration of the ensuing internal and (mainly) external policy choices of these nations. This book will be of much interest to students of Cold War Studies, international history, foreign policy, security studies and IR in general.

Neutrality And Neutralism In The Global Cold War

Author: Sandra Bott
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781138886216
Size: 77.15 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 7088
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This book sheds new light on the role of neutral states and the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) in the global Cold War. The volume places the neutrals and the NAM in the context of the Cold War and demonstrate the links between the East, the West and the so-called 'Third World'. It thus provides readers with an alternative way of exploring the evolution and impact of the Cold War on North-South connections that challenges traditional notions of the post-1945 history of international relations. The various contributions are framed against the backdrop of two broad historical developments: the evolution of the Cold War international system (roughly from the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949 to the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1990) and the decolonization process in the Southern hemisphere. All contributions proceed from the simple premise that these two historical processes were inexorably linked and affected the policy choices of virtually all countries. In particular, the interconnections between the Cold War and decolonization produced what is widely referred to as the 'Global Cold War'. Within the context of these two broad developments, several European states adopted (or continued to adhere to in the case of Sweden and Switzerland) a foreign policy of neutrality, while most newly independent countries in Asia and Africa endeavored to avoid direct alignment with either the Soviet Union or the United States. Many of these countries participated in the 1955 Afro-Asian Conference at Bandung and later collaborated to form the Non-Aligned Movement in 1961. Via a series of case studies, the chapters here explore the ensuing internal and (mainly) external policy choices of these nations in the Global Cold War. By juxtaposing the policies of European neutrals and countries of the Non-Aligned Movement, the book offers new perspectives on the evolution of the Cold War. This book will be of much interest to students of Cold War Studies, international history, foreign policy, security studies and IR in general.

New Perspectives On The End Of The Cold War

Author: Bernhard Blumenau
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351744909
Size: 50.91 MB
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This collection of essays makes a significant contribution to the historiography of the end of the Cold War. Research on the causes and consequences of the end of the Cold War is constantly growing. Initially, it was dominated by fairly simplistic, and often politically motivated, debates revolving around the role played by major "winners" and "losers". This volume addresses a number of diverse issues and seeks to challenge several "common wisdoms" about the end of the Cold War. Together, the contributions provide insights on the role of personalities as well as the impact of transnational movements and forces on the unexpected political transformations of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Geographically, the chapters largely focus on the United States, Europe, with special emphasis on Germany, and the Soviet Union. The individual chapters are drawn together by the overarching theme relating to a particular "common wisdom": were the transformations that occurred truly "unexpected"? This collection of essays will make an important contribution to the growing literature on the developments that produced the collapse of the Iron Curtain, the demise of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. This volume will be of much interest to students of Cold War Studies, International History, European Politics and International Relations in general.

New Perspectives On The End Of The Cold War

Author: Bernhard Blumenau
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351744909
Size: 14.42 MB
Format: PDF
View: 4296
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This collection of essays makes a significant contribution to the historiography of the end of the Cold War. Research on the causes and consequences of the end of the Cold War is constantly growing. Initially, it was dominated by fairly simplistic, and often politically motivated, debates revolving around the role played by major "winners" and "losers". This volume addresses a number of diverse issues and seeks to challenge several "common wisdoms" about the end of the Cold War. Together, the contributions provide insights on the role of personalities as well as the impact of transnational movements and forces on the unexpected political transformations of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Geographically, the chapters largely focus on the United States, Europe, with special emphasis on Germany, and the Soviet Union. The individual chapters are drawn together by the overarching theme relating to a particular "common wisdom": were the transformations that occurred truly "unexpected"? This collection of essays will make an important contribution to the growing literature on the developments that produced the collapse of the Iron Curtain, the demise of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. This volume will be of much interest to students of Cold War Studies, International History, European Politics and International Relations in general.

Us Strategic Arms Policy In The Cold War

Author: David Tal
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351802658
Size: 16.96 MB
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This book examines the negotiations between the USA and the USSR on the limitation of strategic arms during the Cold War, from 1969 to 1979. The negotiations on the limitation of strategic arms, which were concluded in two agreements SALT I and SALT II (with only the first ratified), marked a major change in the history of arms control negotiations. For the first time, in the relatively short history of nuclear weapons and negotiations over nuclear disarmament, the two major nuclear powers had agreed to put limits on the size of their nuclear strategic arms. However, the negotiations between the US and USSR were the easy part of the process. The more difficult part was the negotiations among the Americans. Through the study of a decade of negotiations on the limitation of strategic arms in the Cold War, this book examines the forces that either allowed US presidents and senior officials to pave a path toward a US arms limitation policy, or prevented them from doing so. Most importantly, the book discusses the meaning of these negotiations and agreements on the limitation of strategic arms, and seeks to identify the intention of the negotiators: Were they aiming at making the world a safer place? What was the purpose of the negotiations and agreements within US strategic thinking, both militarily and diplomatically? Were they aimed at improving relations with the Soviet Union, or only at enhancing the strategic balance as one component of the strategic nuclear deterrence between the two powers? This book will be of much interest to students of Cold War history, arms control, US foreign policy and international relations in general.

Battleground Berlin

Author: David E. Murphy
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300078718
Size: 48.68 MB
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Two veteran intelligence agents, one from the CIA and the other from the KGB, join together in an unprecedented collaboration to trace the activities of the two intelligence agencies at the start of the Cold War in postwar Berlin. UP.

International History Of The Twentieth Century

Author: Antony Best
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 0415207401
Size: 45.71 MB
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This major global history of the twentieth century is written by four prominent international historians for first-year undergraduate level and upward. Using their thematic and regional expertise, the authors cover events in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas from the last century and beyond. Among the areas this book covers are: the decline of European hegemony over the international order; the diffusion of power to the two superpowers; the rise of newly independent states in Asia and Africa; and, the course and consequences of the major global conflicts of the twentieth century. This second edition is thoroughly updated, and includes extended coverage of European integration, the rise of supra-governmental organizations, and the 'global War on Terror'.

Madness In Cold War America

Author: Alexander Dunst
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 131736080X
Size: 13.41 MB
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This book tells the story of how madness came to play a prominent part in America’s political and cultural debates. It argues that metaphors of madness rise to unprecedented popularity amidst the domestic struggles of the early Cold War and become a pre-eminent way of understanding the relationship between politics and culture in the United States. In linking the individual psyche to society, psychopathology contributes to issues central to post-World War II society: a dramatic extension of state power, the fate of the individual in bureaucratic society, the political function of emotions, and the limits to admissible dissent. Such vocabulary may accuse opponents of being crazy. Yet at stake is a fundamental error of judgment, for which madness provides welcome metaphors across US diplomacy and psychiatry, social movements and criticism, literature and film. In the process, major parties and whole historical eras, literary movements and social groups are declared insane. Reacting against violence at home and war abroad, countercultural authors oppose a sane madness to irrational reason—romanticizing the wisdom of the schizophrenic and paranoia’s superior insight. As the Sixties give way to a plurality of lifestyles an alternative vision arrives: of a madness now become so widespread and ordinary that it may, finally, escape pathology.

Containing Coexistence

Author: Jussi M. Hanhimäki
Publisher: Kent State University Press
ISBN: 9780873385589
Size: 70.77 MB
Format: PDF
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A study of Finland's role in Soviet-American relations during the onset of the Cold War. It examines Finland's attempts to remain neutral after World War II and not join the people's democracies in 1945, and covers the Finnish Solution, whereby Finland was allowed to coexist with the Soviets.