More Than Freedom

Author: Stephen Kantrowitz
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101575190
Size: 64.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3481
Download
A major new narrative account of the long struggle of Northern activists-both black and white, famous and obscure-to establish African Americans as free citizens, from abolitionism through the Civil War, Reconstruction, and its demise Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation is generally understood as the moment African Americans became free, and Reconstruction as the ultimately unsuccessful effort to extend that victory by establishing equal citizenship. In More Than Freedom, award-winning historian Stephen Kantrowitz boldly redefines our understanding of this entire era by showing that the fight to abolish slavery was always part of a much broader campaign to establish full citizenship for African Americans and find a place to belong in a white republic. More Than Freedom chronicles this epic struggle through the lived experiences of black and white activists in and around Boston, including both famous reformers such as Frederick Douglass and Charles Sumner and lesser-known but equally important figures like the journalist William Cooper Nell and the ex-slaves Lewis and Harriet Hayden. While these freedom fighters have traditionally been called abolitionists, their goals and achievements went far beyond emancipation. They mobilized long before they had white allies to rely on and remained militant long after the Civil War ended. These black freedmen called themselves "colored citizens" and fought to establish themselves in American public life, both by building their own networks and institutions and by fiercely, often violently, challenging proslavery and inegalitarian laws and prejudice. But as Kantrowitz explains, they also knew that until the white majority recognized them as equal participants in common projects they would remain a suspect class. Equal citizenship meant something far beyond freedom: not only full legal and political rights, but also acceptance, inclusion and respect across the color line. Even though these reformers ultimately failed to remake the nation in the way they hoped, their struggle catalyzed the arrival of Civil War and left the social and political landscape of the Union forever altered. Without their efforts, war and Reconstruction could hardly have begun. Bringing a bold new perspective to one of our nation's defining moments, More Than Freedom helps to explain the extent and the limits of the so-called freedom achieved in 1865 and the legacy that endures today.

More Than Freedom

Author: Stephen Kantrowitz
Publisher: Penguin Paperbacks
ISBN: 9780143123446
Size: 12.89 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6694
Download
A narrative chronicle of the efforts of Northern activists to establish free citizenship for African Americans before and after the Civil War offers an award-winning historian's perspectives on the era to explain how their campaigns redefined citizenship and extended well beyond the parameters of emancipation. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

More Than Freedom

Author: Stephen David Kantrowitz
Publisher: Penguin Press HC
ISBN: 9781594203428
Size: 17.59 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 663
Download
Chronicles the efforts of Northern activists to establish free citizenship for African Americans before and after the Civil War, explaining how their campaigns redefined citizenship and extended well beyond the parameters of emancipation.

Ben Tillman And The Reconstruction Of White Supremacy

Author: Stephen Kantrowitz
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469625555
Size: 61.57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2127
Download
Through the life of Benjamin Ryan Tillman (1847-1918), South Carolina's self-styled agrarian rebel, this book traces the history of white male supremacy and its discontents from the era of plantation slavery to the age of Jim Crow. As an anti-Reconstruction guerrilla, Democratic activist, South Carolina governor, and U.S. senator, Tillman offered a vision of reform that was proudly white supremacist. In the name of white male militance, productivity, and solidarity, he justified lynching and disfranchised most of his state's black voters. His arguments and accomplishments rested on the premise that only productive and virtuous white men should govern and that federal power could never be trusted. Over the course of his career, Tillman faced down opponents ranging from agrarian radicals to aristocratic conservatives, from woman suffragists to black Republicans. His vision and his voice shaped the understandings of millions and helped create the violent, repressive world of the Jim Crow South. Friend and foe alike--and generations of historians--interpreted Tillman's physical and rhetorical violence in defense of white supremacy as a matter of racial and gender instinct. This book instead reveals that Tillman's white supremacy was a political program and social argument whose legacies continue to shape American life.

Word By Word

Author: Christopher Hager
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674067487
Size: 58.15 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3166
Download
Consigned to illiteracy, American slaves left little record of their thoughts and feelings—or so we have believed. But a few learned to use pen and paper to make sense of their experiences, despite prohibitions. These authors’ perspectives rewrite the history of emancipation and force us to rethink the relationship between literacy and freedom.

The End Of Days

Author: Matthew Harper
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469629372
Size: 35.92 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 3979
Download
For 4 million slaves, emancipation was a liberation and resurrection story of biblical proportion, both the clearest example of God's intervention in human history and a sign of the end of days. In this book, Matthew Harper demonstrates how black southerners' theology, in particular their understanding of the end times, influenced nearly every major economic and political decision they made in the aftermath of emancipation. From considering what demands to make in early Reconstruction to deciding whether or not to migrate west, African American Protestants consistently inserted themselves into biblical narratives as a way of seeing the importance of their own struggle in God's greater plan for humanity. Phrases like "jubilee," "Zion," "valley of dry bones," and the "New Jerusalem" in black-authored political documents invoked different stories from the Bible to argue for different political strategies. This study offers new ways of understanding the intersections between black political and religious thought of this era. Until now, scholarship on black religion has not highlighted how pervasive or contested these beliefs were. This narrative, however, tracks how these ideas governed particular political moments as African Americans sought to define and defend their freedom in the forty years following emancipation.

All Men Free And Brethren

Author: Peter P. Hinks
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780801450303
Size: 64.52 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5750
Download
The first in-depth account of an African American institution that spans the history of the American Republic.

If They Don T Bring Their Women Here

Author: George Anthony Peffer
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252067778
Size: 22.43 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7748
Download
"Seven years before the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 comprehensively disqualified all members of China's laboring class from immigration status, the Page Law sought to stem the tide of Chinese prostitutes entering the United States. Yet during these seven years it was not just prostitutes but all Chinese females who encountered at best hostility and at worst expulsion when they reached the ""Golden Door."" In this first detailed account of Chinese American women's lives in the preexclusion era, George Anthony Peffer investigates how administrative agencies and federal courts enforced immigration laws. Peffer documents the habeas corpus trials in which the wives and daughters of Chinese laborers were required to prove their status as legal immigrants or be returned to China. He also surveys the virulently anti- Chinese coverage these trials and the issue of Chinese immigration received in California newspapers, confirming that Chinatown's prostitution industry so dominated the popular imagination as to render other classes of female immigrants all but invisible. In the words of one immigration judge, the United States remained favorable to Chinese immigration in the preexclusion period ""if they don't bring their women here."" This important study amplifies the voices of immigrant women who did not fit into the preconceived categories American officials created and establishes a place for them within the historiographic framework of Chinese American studies."

Black Bostonians

Author: James Oliver Horton
Publisher: Holmes & Meier Pub
ISBN:
Size: 58.81 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6895
Download

Beyond Redemption

Author: Carole Emberton
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022602427X
Size: 55.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6313
Download
In the months after the end of the Civil War, there was one word on everyone’s lips: redemption. From the fiery language of Radical Republicans calling for a reconstruction of the former Confederacy to the petitions of those individuals who had worked the land as slaves to the white supremacists who would bring an end to Reconstruction in the late 1870s, this crucial concept informed the ways in which many people—both black and white, northerner and southerner—imagined the transformation of the American South. Beyond Redemption explores how the violence of a protracted civil war shaped the meaning of freedom and citizenship in the new South. Here, Carole Emberton traces the competing meanings that redemption held for Americans as they tried to come to terms with the war and the changing social landscape. While some imagined redemption from the brutality of slavery and war, others—like the infamous Ku Klux Klan—sought political and racial redemption for their losses through violence. Beyond Redemption merges studies of race and American manhood with an analysis of post-Civil War American politics to offer unconventional and challenging insight into the violence of Reconstruction.