Models Of Life

Author: Kim Sneppen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316061655
Size: 22.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 414
Download
Reflecting the major advances that have been made in the field over the past decade, this book provides an overview of current models of biological systems. The focus is on simple quantitative models, highlighting their role in enhancing our understanding of the strategies of gene regulation and dynamics of information transfer along signalling pathways, as well as in unravelling the interplay between function and evolution. The chapters are self-contained, each describing key methods for studying the quantitative aspects of life through the use of physical models. They focus, in particular, on connecting the dynamics of proteins and DNA with strategic decisions on the larger scale of a living cell, using E. coli and phage lambda as key examples. Encompassing fields such as quantitative molecular biology, systems biology and biophysics, this book will be a valuable tool for students from both biological and physical science backgrounds.

Epigenetics And Systems Biology

Author: Leonie Ringrose
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 0128030763
Size: 26.57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 527
Download
Epigenetics and Systems Biology highlights the need for collaboration between experiments and theoretical modeling that is required for successful application of systems biology in epigenetics studies. This book breaks down the obstacles which exist between systems biology and epigenetics researchers due to information barriers and segmented research, giving real-life examples of successful combinations of systems biology and epigenetics experiments. Each section covers one type of modeling and one set of epigenetic questions on which said models have been successfully applied. In addition, the book highlights how modeling and systems biology relate to studies of RNA, DNA, and genome instability, mechanisms of DNA damage signaling and repair, and the effect of the environment on genome stability. Presents original research in a wider perspective to reveal potential for synergies between the two fields of study Provides the latest experiments in primary literature for the modeling audience Includes chapters written by experts in systems biology and epigenetics who have vast experience studying clinical applications

Quantitative Viral Ecology

Author: Joshua S. Weitz
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400873967
Size: 34.49 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6669
Download
When we think about viruses we tend to consider ones that afflict humans—such as those that cause influenza, HIV, and Ebola. Yet, vastly more viruses infect single-celled microbes. Diverse and abundant, microbes and the viruses that infect them are found in oceans, lakes, plants, soil, and animal-associated microbiomes. Taking a vital look at the "microscopic" mode of disease dynamics, Quantitative Viral Ecology establishes a theoretical foundation from which to model and predict the ecological and evolutionary dynamics that result from the interaction between viruses and their microbial hosts. Joshua Weitz addresses three major questions: What are viruses of microbes and what do they do to their hosts? How do interactions of a single virus-host pair affect the number and traits of hosts and virus populations? How do virus-host dynamics emerge in natural environments when interactions take place between many viruses and many hosts? Emphasizing how theory and models can provide answers, Weitz offers a cohesive framework for tackling new challenges in the study of viruses and microbes and how they are connected to ecological processes—from the laboratory to the Earth system. Quantitative Viral Ecology is an innovative exploration of the influence of viruses in our complex natural world.

Systems Biology Simulation Of Dynamic Network States

Author: Bernhard Ø. Palsson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139495429
Size: 30.67 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6233
Download
Biophysical models have been used in biology for decades, but they have been limited in scope and size. In this book, Bernhard Ø. Palsson shows how network reconstructions that are based on genomic and bibliomic data, and take the form of established stoichiometric matrices, can be converted into dynamic models using metabolomic and fluxomic data. The Mass Action Stoichiometric Simulation (MASS) procedure can be used for any cellular process for which data is available and allows a scalable step-by-step approach to the practical construction of network models. Specifically, it can treat integrated processes that need explicit accounting of small molecules and protein, which allows simulation at the molecular level. The material has been class-tested by the author at both the undergraduate and graduate level. All computations in the text are available online in MATLAB and MATHEMATICA® workbooks, allowing hands-on practice with the material.

Dynamic Systems Biology Modeling And Simulation

Author: Joseph DiStefano III
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 0124104932
Size: 38.76 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6012
Download
Dynamic Systems Biology Modeling and Simuation consolidates and unifies classical and contemporary multiscale methodologies for mathematical modeling and computer simulation of dynamic biological systems – from molecular/cellular, organ-system, on up to population levels. The book pedagogy is developed as a well-annotated, systematic tutorial – with clearly spelled-out and unified nomenclature – derived from the author’s own modeling efforts, publications and teaching over half a century. Ambiguities in some concepts and tools are clarified and others are rendered more accessible and practical. The latter include novel qualitative theory and methodologies for recognizing dynamical signatures in data using structural (multicompartmental and network) models and graph theory; and analyzing structural and measurement (data) models for quantification feasibility. The level is basic-to-intermediate, with much emphasis on biomodeling from real biodata, for use in real applications. Introductory coverage of core mathematical concepts such as linear and nonlinear differential and difference equations, Laplace transforms, linear algebra, probability, statistics and stochastics topics; PLUS ....... The pertinent biology, biochemistry, biophysics or pharmacology for modeling are provided, to support understanding the amalgam of “math modeling” with life sciences. Strong emphasis on quantifying as well as building and analyzing biomodels: includes methodology and computational tools for parameter identifiability and sensitivity analysis; parameter estimation from real data; model distinguishability and simplification; and practical bioexperiment design and optimization. Companion website provides solutions and program code for examples and exercises using Matlab, Simulink, VisSim, SimBiology, SAAMII, AMIGO, Copasi and SBML-coded models. A full set of PowerPoint slides are available from the author for teaching from his textbook. He uses them to teach a 10 week quarter upper division course at UCLA, which meets twice a week, so there are 20 lectures. They can easily be augmented or stretched for a 15 week semester course. Importantly, the slides are editable, so they can be readily adapted to a lecturer’s personal style and course content needs. The lectures are based on excerpts from 12 of the first 13 chapters of DSBMS. They are designed to highlight the key course material, as a study guide and structure for students following the full text content. The complete PowerPoint slide package (~25 MB) can be obtained by instructors (or prospective instructors) by emailing the author directly, at: [email protected]

Modeling Life

Author: Alan Garfinkel
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319597310
Size: 62.68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 5791
Download
This book develops the mathematical tools essential for students in the life sciences to describe interacting systems and predict their behavior. From predator-prey populations in an ecosystem, to hormone regulation within the body, the natural world abounds in dynamical systems that affect us profoundly. Complex feedback relations and counter-intuitive responses are common in nature; this book develops the quantitative skills needed to explore these interactions. Differential equations are the natural mathematical tool for quantifying change, and are the driving force throughout this book. The use of Euler’s method makes nonlinear examples tractable and accessible to a broad spectrum of early-stage undergraduates, thus providing a practical alternative to the procedural approach of a traditional Calculus curriculum. Tools are developed within numerous, relevant examples, with an emphasis on the construction, evaluation, and interpretation of mathematical models throughout. Encountering these concepts in context, students learn not only quantitative techniques, but how to bridge between biological and mathematical ways of thinking. Examples range broadly, exploring the dynamics of neurons and the immune system, through to population dynamics and the Google PageRank algorithm. Each scenario relies only on an interest in the natural world; no biological expertise is assumed of student or instructor. Building on a single prerequisite of Precalculus, the book suits a two-quarter sequence for first or second year undergraduates, and meets the mathematical requirements of medical school entry. The later material provides opportunities for more advanced students in both mathematics and life sciences to revisit theoretical knowledge in a rich, real-world framework. In all cases, the focus is clear: how does the math help us understand the science?

Modeling Dynamics Biological Systems

Author: Bruce Hannon
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780387948508
Size: 74.54 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 290
Download
Using STELLA and MADONNA software, Modeling Dynamic Biological Systems applies methods of computer modeling to real-world phenomena in a wide range of topics from laboratory biology and ecology. The book includes sections on physical and biochemical processes, genetics, single- and multiple-population dynamics, and catastrophe and self-organization. STELLA and MADONNA run-time software as well as computer files of sample models accompany the book on a CD-ROM. STELLA software is compatible with both Macintosh - and Windows-based computers.

Understanding The Dynamics Of Biological Systems

Author: Werner Dubitzky
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781441979643
Size: 44.37 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6451
Download
This book is intended as a communication platform to bridge the cultural, conceptual, and technological gap among the key systems biology disciplines of biology, mathematics, and information technology. To support this goal, contributors were asked to adopts an approach that appeals to audiences from different backgrounds.

Systems Biology

Author: Andreas Kremling
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1466567899
Size: 62.14 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1658
Download
Drawing on the latest research in the field, Systems Biology: Mathematical Modeling and Model Analysis presents many methods for modeling and analyzing biological systems, in particular cellular systems. It shows how to use predictive mathematical models to acquire and analyze knowledge about cellular systems. It also explores how the models are systematically applied in biotechnology. The first part of the book introduces biological basics, such as metabolism, signaling, gene expression, and control as well as mathematical modeling fundamentals, including deterministic models and thermodynamics. The text also discusses linear regression methods, explains the differences between linear and nonlinear regression, and illustrates how to determine input variables to improve estimation accuracy during experimental design. The second part covers intracellular processes, including enzymatic reactions, polymerization processes, and signal transduction. The author highlights the process–function–behavior sequence in cells and shows how modeling and analysis of signal transduction units play a mediating role between process and function. The third part presents theoretical methods that address the dynamics of subsystems and the behavior near a steady state. It covers techniques for determining different time scales, sensitivity analysis, structural kinetic modeling, and theoretical control engineering aspects, including a method for robust control. It also explores frequent patterns (motifs) in biochemical networks, such as the feed-forward loop in the transcriptional network of E. coli. Moving on to models that describe a large number of individual reactions, the last part looks at how these cellular models are used in biotechnology. The book also explains how graphs can illustrate the link between two components in large networks with several interactions.

Stochastic Dynamics For Systems Biology

Author: Christian Mazza
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1466514949
Size: 55.40 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1961
Download
Stochastic Dynamics for Systems Biology is one of the first books to provide a systematic study of the many stochastic models used in systems biology. The book shows how the mathematical models are used as technical tools for simulating biological processes and how the models lead to conceptual insights on the functioning of the cellular processing system. Most of the text should be accessible to scientists with basic knowledge in calculus and probability theory. The authors illustrate the relevant Markov chain theory using realistic models from systems biology, including signaling and metabolic pathways, phosphorylation processes, genetic switches, and transcription. A central part of the book presents an original and up-to-date treatment of cooperativity. The book defines classical indexes, such as the Hill coefficient, using notions from statistical mechanics. It explains why binding curves often have S-shapes and why cooperative behaviors can lead to ultrasensitive genetic switches. These notions are then used to model transcription rates. Examples cover the phage lambda genetic switch and eukaryotic gene expression. The book then presents a short course on dynamical systems and describes stochastic aspects of linear noise approximation. This mathematical framework enables the simplification of complex stochastic dynamics using Gaussian processes and nonlinear ODEs. Simple examples illustrate the technique in noise propagation in gene networks and the effects of network structures on multistability and gene expression noise levels. The last chapter provides up-to-date results on stochastic and deterministic mass action kinetics with applications to enzymatic biochemical reactions and metabolic pathways.