Migra

Author: Kelly Lytle Hernandez
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520257693
Size: 32.84 MB
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Reveals the untold history of the United States Border Patrol from its beginnings in 1924 as a small peripheral outfit to its emergence as a large professional police force. This book focuses on the daily challenges of policing the borderlands and bringsto light unexpected partners and forgotten dynamics.--[source unknown].

Line In The Sand

Author: Rachel St. John
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400838639
Size: 60.65 MB
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Line in the Sand details the dramatic transformation of the western U.S.-Mexico border from its creation at the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848 to the emergence of the modern boundary line in the first decades of the twentieth century. In this sweeping narrative, Rachel St. John explores how this boundary changed from a mere line on a map to a clearly marked and heavily regulated divide between the United States and Mexico. Focusing on the desert border to the west of the Rio Grande, this book explains the origins of the modern border and places the line at the center of a transnational history of expanding capitalism and state power in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Moving across local, regional, and national scales, St. John shows how government officials, Native American raiders, ranchers, railroad builders, miners, investors, immigrants, and smugglers contributed to the rise of state power on the border and developed strategies to navigate the increasingly regulated landscape. Over the border's history, the U.S. and Mexican states gradually developed an expanding array of official laws, ad hoc arrangements, government agents, and physical barriers that did not close the line, but made it a flexible barrier that restricted the movement of some people, goods, and animals without impeding others. By the 1930s, their efforts had created the foundations of the modern border control apparatus. Drawing on extensive research in U.S. and Mexican archives, Line in the Sand weaves together a transnational history of how an undistinguished strip of land became the significant and symbolic space of state power and national definition that we know today.

Desert Duty

Author: Bill Broyles
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292783388
Size: 33.82 MB
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While politicians and pundits endlessly debate immigration policy, U.S. Border Patrol agents put their lives on the line to enforce immigration law. In a day's work, agents may catch a load of narcotics, apprehend groups of people entering the country illegally, and intercept a potential terrorist. Their days often include rescuing aliens from death by thirst or murder by border bandits, preventing neighborhood assaults and burglaries, and administering first aid to accident victims, and may involve delivering an untimely baby or helping stranded motorists. As Bill Broyles and Mark Haynes sum it up, "Border Patrol is a hero job," one that too often goes unrecognized by the public. Desert Duty puts a human face on the Border Patrol. It features interviews with nineteen active-duty and retired agents who have worked at the Wellton, Arizona, station that watches over what is arguably the most perilous crossing along the border—a sparsely populated region of the Sonoran Desert with little water and summer temperatures that routinely top 110°F. The agents candidly discuss the rewards and frustrations of holding the line against illegal immigrants, smugglers, and other criminals—while often having to help the very people they are trying to thwart when they get into trouble in the desert. As one agent explains, "The thrill is tracking 'em up before they die. It's a rough ol' way to go—run outta water in this desert."

Continental Crossroads

Author: Samuel Truett
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822333890
Size: 31.80 MB
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The lands along the U.S.-Mexico border have long supported a complex web of relationships transcending the U.S. and Mexican nations, processes at once part of and separate from national histories. Yet these borderlands histories are characterized most of all by their absence from mainstream history. In revealing them, Continental Crossroads lays the foundations for a new borderlands history that lies at the crossroads of Chicano/a, Latin American, and U.S. history. Drawing on research based on the archives and historiographies of both the U.S. and Mexico, the contributors chronicle the complex trans-national processes which unfolded between the early nineteenth-century and the 1940s, the formative era of borderlands historiography. The work of a new generation of historians, these essays examine a wide range of topics, including complex inter- and intra-ethnic relationships along the Texas and California borderlands in the early nineteenth century. Contributors look at the multiple literary worlds and imagined communities that emerged in the region--including different versions of the ill-fated 1841 Santa Fe expedition as told by Anglo-Americans, Mexicans, and Indians, and the travel narratives of a Mexican border journalist and revolutionary. Several essays explore Mexican and American relations to others in the region, including African Americans, Chinese, and Europeans. Other essays look at the tensions surrounding the last armed rebellion of Mexican Americans in Texas in 1915 and compare conceptions of masculinity among the Texas Rangers and the U.S. Border Patrol. Contributors: Grace Pea Delgado; Karl Jacoby; Benjamin Johnson; Louise Pubols; Ral.Ramos; Andrs Resndez; Brbara O. Reyes; Alexandra Minna Stern; Samuel Truett; Elliott Young

Border Dilemmas

Author: Anthony P. Mora
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822347970
Size: 57.64 MB
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A historical analysis of the conflicting ideas about race and national belonging held by Mexicans and Euro-Americans in southern New Mexico during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth.

City Of Inmates

Author: Kelly Lytle Hernández
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469631199
Size: 71.40 MB
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Los Angeles incarcerates more people than any other city in the United States, which imprisons more people than any other nation on Earth. This book explains how the City of Angels became the capital city of the world's leading incarcerator. Marshaling more than two centuries of evidence, historian Kelly Lytle Hernandez unmasks how histories of native elimination, immigrant exclusion, and black disappearance drove the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles. In this telling, which spans from the Spanish colonial era to the outbreak of the 1965 Watts Rebellion, Hernandez documents the persistent historical bond between the racial fantasies of conquest, namely its settler colonial form, and the eliminatory capacities of incarceration. But City of Inmates is also a chronicle of resilience and rebellion, documenting how targeted peoples and communities have always fought back. They busted out of jail, forced Supreme Court rulings, advanced revolution across bars and borders, and, as in the summer of 1965, set fire to the belly of the city. With these acts those who fought the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles altered the course of history in the city, the borderlands, and beyond. This book recounts how the dynamics of conquest met deep reservoirs of rebellion as Los Angeles became the City of Inmates, the nation's carceral core. It is a story that is far from over.

Changing National Identities At The Frontier

Author: Andrés Reséndez
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521543194
Size: 54.21 MB
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This book explores how the diverse and fiercely independent peoples of Texas and New Mexico came to think of themselves as members of one particular national community or another in the years leading up to the Mexican-American War. Hispanics, Native Americans, and Anglo Americans made agonizing and crucial identity decisions against the backdrop of two structural transformations taking place in the region during the first half of the 19th century and often pulling in opposite directions.

Standing On Common Ground

Author: Geraldo L. Cadava
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674726189
Size: 14.25 MB
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Under constant, increasingly militarized surveillance, the Arizona-Sonora border is portrayed in the media as a site of sharp political and ethnic divisions. But this view obscures the region's deeper history. Bringing to light the shared cultural and commercial ties through which businessmen and politicians forged a transnational Sunbelt, Standing on Common Ground recovers the vibrant connections between Tucson, Arizona, and the neighboring Mexican state of Sonora. Geraldo L. Cadava corrects misunderstandings of the borderland's past and calls attention to the many types of exchange, beyond labor migrations, that demonstrate how the United States and Mexico continue to shape one another. In the 1940s, a flourishing cross-border traffic developed among entrepreneurs, tourists, and students, as politicians on both sides worked to cultivate a common ground of free enterprise.However, the modernizing forces of manufacturing, ranching, and agriculture marginalized the very workers who propped up the regional economy, and would eventually lead to the social and economic instability that has troubled the Arizona-Sonora corridor in recent times. Standing on Common Ground clarifies why we cannot understand today's fierce debates over illegal immigration and border enforcement without identifying the roots of these problems in the Sunbelt's complex pan-ethnic and transnational history.

Fit To Be Citizens

Author: Natalia Molina
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520246485
Size: 64.83 MB
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Shows how science and public health shaped the meaning of race in the early twentieth century. Examining the experiences of Mexican, Japanese, and Chinese immigrants in Los Angeles, this book illustrates the ways health officials used complexly constructed concerns about public health to demean, diminish, discipline, and define racial groups.

The Ins On The Line

Author: S. Deborah Kang
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199757437
Size: 79.25 MB
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"For much of the twentieth century, Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) officials recognized that the US-Mexico border region was a special case. Here, the INS confronted a set of political, social, and environmental obstacles that prevented it from replicating its achievements at the immigration stations of Angel Island and Ellis Island. In response to these challenges, local INS officials resorted to the law--amending, nullifying, and even rewriting the nation's immigration laws for the borderlands, as well as enforcing them. In The INS on the Line, S. Deborah Kang traces the ways in which the INS on the US-Mexico border made the nation's immigration laws over the course of the twentieth century. While the INS is primarily thought to be a law enforcement agency, Kang demonstrates that the agency also defined itself as a lawmaking body. Through a nuanced examination of the agency's admission, deportation, and enforcement practices in the Southwest, she reveals how local immigration officials constructed a complex approach to border control, one that closed the line in the name of nativism and national security, opened it for the benefit of transnational economic and social concerns, and redefined it as a vast legal jurisdiction for the policing of undocumented immigrants. Despite its contingent and local origins, this composite approach to border control, Kang concludes, continues to inform the daily operations of the nation's immigration agencies, American immigration law and policy, and conceptions of this border today"--